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November 21, 1984 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-21

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4

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 21, 1984
Study says schools
don't build characi
WASHINGTON (AP) - A group of or timidity, about the topic
educatorsand scholars, alarmedeat character is especially inconl
soaring rates of teenage homicides, this time."
suicides and out-of-wedlock births, It cited government s
yesterday attacked what it called the showing that out-of-wedlock
"timidity" of schools in instilling good white females ages 15-19
character traits in the young. creased 800 percent since 1940
The 27 academics, school officials rate of death by homicidef
and policy-makers, including several males, 15-24, climbed 315 perc
prominent conservatives, warned in a suicides rose 238 percent betv
"Thanksgiving Statement" that and 1981. It did not give fib
"schools in general are not doing other races, but said the stat
enough to counter the symptoms of blacks also were "very distres
serious decline in youth character." "These measures of youth
THEY SAID the recent spate of have increased far more qui
school reform reports "have bypassed the similar adult measures,"t
the critical issue of youth character," said.
and they offered an array of THE REPORT also decries
suggestions for rectifying that called the growing "dep
omission, from putting more emphasis talization" of American scho
on school ceremonies to allowing non- "to the sixth grade and low(
teachers with leadership qualities to students wandering from clas
become principals. instead of spending all day
Many recommendations in the 36- teacher.
page report, "Developing Character: The report endorsed tui
Transmitting Knowledge," echo earlier credits or other subsidies fo
calls for higher academic standards, schools, saying competiton1
creation of job ladders for "master" healthy for public schoo
teachers and more challenging tex- sparked dissents from four sib
tbooks. cluding three public school
But the group also cautioned that Private schools can expect go'
"good character is not generated solely intervention to accompa
by more homework, rigorous significant aid, the report caut
traditional grading and better pupil The editor, Edward W
discipline." University of Illinois e
"YOUNG PEOPLE today are more professor, defined character
likely to commit suicide, or kill one servable good conduct: hone
another, and males are more likely to sistence, good humor, courtes
make unmarried females pregnant," ability to participate in co
the report said. "The general silence, work."

i

ter
of youth
gruous at
statistics
births to
have in-
0, and the
for white
cent while
ween 1955
gures for
tistics for
sing."
disorder
ckly than
the report
A what it
pa rtmen-
ools down
er," with
s to class
with one
ition tax
r private
would be
ls. That
gners, in-
officials.
vernment
ny any
ioned.
ynne, a
ducation
as "ob-
tsty, per-
y and the
operative

Associated Press

Cabbage patch pick-up

Cara Renee Campbell, 14 months, finds herself among friends her own size
as she sits in the midst of a display of dolls at a crafts show over the weekend
in Miami.

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SahWidomn
receives
Kennedy
award

WASHINGTON (UPI) - A woman from El Salvador
received the first Robert F. Kennedy human rights award
yesterday while chairs sat empty on a Georgetown Univer-
sity podium for members of her group denied U.S. visas for
"terrorist activities."
The emotional ceremony mixed memories of the former
senator, murdered during the 1968 presidential campaign,
and of Salvadoran victims of political violence with subdued
anger at the State Department's denial of visas to the four
other human rights advocates.
KENNEDY'S WIFE, Ethel, and his brother, Sen. Edward

Kennedy (D-Mass.), presented the $30,000 award to Alicia de
Barcia, 42, on behalf of the Committee of Mothers and
Relatives of Political Prisoners, Disappeared and
Assasinated Persons of El Salvador.
"We pay tribute in his name," Sen. Kennedy said of his
brother, a vocal advocate of civil rights, and "to those who
have sent forth the ripple of hope."
The mothers committee, formed in 1977, stages demon-
strations to pressure Salvadoran authorities to free political
prisoners, investigate disappearances and holds talks with
leftist guerrillas.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Kirkpatrick to resign in Dec.
UNITED NATIONS - U.N. Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick yester-
day announced she plans to resign after the end of the 39th General Assem-
bly session in December and return to private life.
Kirkpatrick, 58, told reporters she has not yet submitted her resignation to
the White House but intended to talk soon with President Reagan to "work
something out."
It was reported during the election campaign, though never confirmed by
Kirkpatrick, that she wanted the posts of either secretary of state or national
security adviser in the next Reagan administration.
There was no immediate reaction from the White House.
Though a life-long Democrat, she gave up a position as professor of com-
parative politics at Georgetown University when she was selected by
Reagan in 1981 to be the permanent U.S. representative to the United
Nations.
Kirkpatrick said she has told Reagan many times of her desire to leave the
United Nations and return to teaching.
Mexico City death toll hits 544
MEXICO CITY - Army troops yesterday poked through the charred ruins
of a working class Mexico City suburb in a grisly search for more victims of
gas explosions and fire that Red Cross officials said claimed the lives of at
least 544 people.
Authorities said another 1,500 people were injured in the holocaust that
erupted early Monday when a gas truck exploded near a gas distributon cen-
ter in one of several impoverished neighborhoods clustered on Mexico City's
northern edge.
Ten thousand were left homeless in the worst industrial disaster in
Mexican history.
More than 24 hours after the predawn explosions, small fires still blazed in
the barren neighborhood and the smell of gas and burned blesh hung thick in
the air.
Red Cross spokesman Jose Calderon said the bodies of 544 people killed in
the fire had been recovered. He said that because of the severe burns
covering most of the dead, only 317 bodies had been identified.
British telephone giant sells stock
LONDON - In another dramatic denationalization move by Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher's conservative government, British Telecom
offered more than half its shares to the public yesterday in the biggest stock
offering in history.
"It is easily the largest share issue that has ever taken place anywhere,"
said Martin Jacomb of Kleinwort Benson, the merchant banking firm ad-
vising the Thatcher government on the sale of stock by the world's fourth-
largest telephone company.
The offering, criticized by the socialist Labor Party, is the Conservative
government's most ambitious effort so far in its continuing program of
divesting the government of nationalized monopolies. Next year the gover-
nment plans to make a similar stock offering to "privatize" British Airways,
the national airline.
NY subway passengers rally
NEW YORK-About 1,500 passengers-most of whom had just been
forced to leave a disabled train-rebelled when asked to evacuate a second
train, chanting "We won't move!" and disrupting service for 90 minutes
during yesterday morning's rush hour.
The passengers rebuffed efforts by 15 transit officers to coax them off the
train, a policeman said. In the end, transit officials relented and found a dif-
ferent train full of passengers to evacuate.
The riders' refusal to leave the train at a station in Brooklyn backed up
"thousands and thousands of passengers" at eight stations, said Donna
Evans, a Transit Authority spokeswoman.
The incident began at 8:45 a.m., when a train developed motor problems
while pulling into the Church Avenue station, Ms. Evans said. About 1,000
people were discharged peacefully, and many boarded the following train.
But three stations north, at the President Street station, the empty,
disabled train broke down completely as it was being taken out of service,
blocking the entrance.
Transit Authority officials decided to discharge the 1,500 passengers on the
second train so they could use it to push the disabled one off the main track,
Evans said.
State upholds killer's conviction
LANSING - The Michigan Court of Appeals yesterday affirmed
William Hardesty's Washtenaw County conviction on five murder counts,
saying authorities did not violate his rights by medicating him during the
trial.
Hardesty was arrested for a series of murders that occurred in October
1978. He was accused of killing his mother and father, as well as Daniel Ed-
ward Wood, Troy Lee Curry and Timothy Layne Schofield.
He originally was found incompetent to stand trial. But his condition later
stabilized and in February 1981, the trial finally began.
Hardesty claimed insanity, but the jury found him guilty but mentally ill
on four counts of first-degree murder, one count of second-degree murder
and two counts of assault with intent to murder.

During the trial, Hardesty's attorney objected to the use of psychotropic
drugs on his client, arguing the jury was getting a distorted picture of the
defendant's mental condition at the time of the slayings.
Vol. XCV -No.466
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Tuesday through Sunday
during the Fall and Winter terms and Tuesday through Saturday during the
Spring and Summer terms by students at the University of Michigan. Sub-
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cate and College Press Service, and United Students Press Service.

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SYMBOL ..,young men 16-35
"OF THE MAN WHO
RECEIVES IN GIVING"
FRANCISCANS
DIRECTOR OF VOCATIONS, FRANCISCANS, TOR
2006 EDGEWATER PARKWAY
SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 20903
Please send me the free booklet at no obligation.

Sharon clings to secrecy

NEW YORK (UPI) - Under sharp
questioning by a Time lawyer, former
Israeli Defense Minister Ariel Sharon
yesterday refused to divulge the con-
tents of a secret report on the 1982
massacre of Palestinians in Beirut.
"If something is secret, I cannot refer
to it because then I would be disobeying
the laws of my country," Sharon said
calmly on his first day of cross-
examination.
BUT THE stocky, white-haired
general added he could disclose that the

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secret report did not contain any of the
allegations made by Time magazine in
its disputed February 1983 cover story
"The Verdict is Guilty."
Sharon, 56, is suing Time for $50
million, contending the article is a "lie"
and "blood libel" against him and the
Jewish people.
Time claims its article is based on the
secret report - known as Appendix B
- that was part of conclusions reached
by an Israeli commission that in-
vestigated the slaughter during the
Isreali invasion of Lebanon.
NO TIME lawyers have ever seen the
classified report.
Israel appointed a commission to in-
vestigate the massacre. The com-
mission's findings were published in
February 1982, except for a secret ap-
pendix. Appendix B was seen only by
Israeli Cabinet Ministers - including
Sharon - who were sworn to secrecy.
Sharon became somber when Barr
prodded him to disclose whether a
meeting in January, 1982, was included
in the Israeli commission's secret
report. .
"I cannot go into any part of the
.report," Sharon repeated.
Sharon was forced to resign as defen-
se minister when the report was
released. He now is Minister of Trade
and Commerce.
Holiday Bowl

LIBERAL ARTS MAJORS ..
'fo're
Needed
All Over the
World,
Ask Peace Corps volunteers why their ingenuity and flexibility
are as vital as their degrees. They'll tell you they are helping
the world's poorest peoples attain self sufficiency in the areas of

not a fan

S

dream trip
(Continued from Page 1)
Bowl ... finances are also a problem,"
Hughes said.
None of the students questioned men-
tioned finals as a reason for not atten-
ding the post-season football game.
"Finals are no problem," said Bill
Young of the Theta Xi house. "We're
going out. We don't have the cash for
Honolulu, but we can go to San Diego."
He estimated that half of the frater-
nity's 20 members would go. "We have
a chapter out at San Diego, so we can
stay there. It's cheaper," Young said.

Editor in Chief...................BILL SPINDLE
Managing Editors .............. CHERYL BAACKE
NEIL CHASE
Associate News Editors.........LAURGE DELATER
GEORGEA KOVANIS
THOMAS MILLER
Personnel Editor...................SUE BARTO
Opinion Page Editors............... JAMES BOYD
JACKIE YOUNG
NEWS STAFF: Laura Bischoff, Dov Cohen, Stephanie
DeGroote, Nancy Dolinko, Lily Eng, Rachel Gottlieb,
Thomas Hrach, Gregory Hutton, Bruce Jackson, Sean
Jackson, Vibeke Laroi, Carrie Levine, Jerry Markon,
Eric Mattson, Molly Melby, Tracey Miller, Kery Mur-
akami, Arona Pearlstein, Lisa Powers, Charles Sewell,
Stacey Shonk, Dan Swanson, Allison Zousmer.
Magazine Editor...............JOSEPH KRAUS
Associate Magazine Editors .....PAULA DOHRING
JOHN LOGIE
Arts Editors.................FANNIE WEINSTEIN
PETE WILLIAMS
Associate Arts Editors.............BYRON L. BULL
JEFF FROOMAN
DENNIS HARVEY
ANDY WEINE

Sports Editor...................MIKE McGRAW
Associate Sports Editors ........... JEFF BERGIDA
KATIE BLACKWELL
PAUL HELGREN
DOUGLAS B. LEVY
STEVE WISE
SPORTS STAFF: Dave Aretha, Andy Arvidson, Mark
Borowsky, Emily Bridgham, Debbie deFrances, Joe
Devyak, Joe Ewing, Chris Gerbasi, Jim Gindin, Skip
Goodman, Jon Hartman, Steve Herz, Rick Kaplan,
Tom Keaney, Mark Kovinsky, Tim Makinen, Adam
Martin, Scott McKnlay, Barb McQuade,AScott Miller
Brad Morgan, Jerry Muth, Phil Nussel, Adam Ochlis,
Mike Redstone, Scott Salowich, Randy Schwartz, Susan
Warner.
Business Manager ............... STEVEN BLOOM
Advertising Manager...............LIZ CARSON
Display Manager............... KELLIE WORLEY
Nationals Manager..................JOE ORTIZ
Sales Manager.............DEBBIE DIOGUARDI
Finance Manager................ LINDA KAFTAN
Marketing Manager..............KELLY SODEN
Classified Manager............ JANICE BOLOGNA
Ass't. Display Manager.........JEFFREY DOBEK
Ass't. Sales Manager...........LAURIE TRUSKE
Ass't. Finance Manager............ JANE CAPLAN
Ass't. Classified Manager........TERRENCE YEE
SALES REPRESENTATIVES: Ellen Abrahams, Sheryl
Beisman, Mark Bookman, Steve Casiani, Peter Gian-
greco, Seth Grossman, Mary Ann Hogan, Mark Stobbs, -

food production, energy conservation, education,
development and health services. And they'll tell
rewards of hands on career experience overseas.

economic
you about the
They'll tell you

The

it's the toughest job you'll ever love.

I

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