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November 21, 1984 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-21

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Ninety-five Years
of
tEditorial Freedom

C I
be

LIE i ian

1 Iai1

Gobble
Mostly sunny with a high in the
30s.

Vol. XCV, No. 66 Copyright 1984, The Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan -Wednesday, November 21, 1984 Fifteen Cents Eight Pages

New draft
weakens
code fiht,
Page says
By LAURIE DELATER
Student leaders may have trouble
rallying opposition to the proposed
student code for non-academic conduct
because changes in the code's latest
draft may be perceived as a sharp shift
in the administration's position, the
president of the Michigan Student
Assembly said yesterday.
University officials say the ad-
ministation's draft released on Friday
reflects criticism from students and the
University's Civil Liberties Board. They
say, for example, that the new draft an-
swers demands for a trial by a jury of
student peers and the right to an attor-
ney.
BUT THE draft's changes are riddled
with new problems which might not be
so easy to make students aware of, said
MSA president Scott Page.
For instance, under the new draft,
only students who break the rules
punishable by suspension for more than
one term or expulsion are guaranteed a
bearing before a panel of their peers.
Moreover, the new judicial system
gives the president of the University the
right to select students to that panel.
And the bulk of the cases will still be
decided by one hearing officer who is an
See NEW, Page 3

Michigan looks

to

Holiday

By MIKE MCGRAW
It looks like it's really going to hap-
pen. The Florida Gators have been
declared ineligible to play in the Sugar
Bowl, clearing the path for Michigan to
participate in the Holiday Bowl in San
Diego against number-one ranked and
undefeated Brigham Young.
Florida won the Southeastern Con-
ference championship this season and
under normal circumstances would
have gotten an automatic bid to the
Sugar Bowl on New Year's Day. But
earlier this season, the Gators were
placed on NCAA probation that
prohibited them from seeing post-
season action for three years.
THE NCAA penalty is under appeal,
but yesterday the Southeastern Con-
ference decided to ban the Gators from
the 1985 Sugar Bowl. Because of this,
Auburn - the previous top choice for
the Holiday Bowl - steps into the
driver's seat to claim the trip to New
Orleans. A win over Alabama on
December 1 will put the Tigers in the
Superdome for the second straight
year.
But regardless of the outcome of the
Alabama game, Auburn is out of the
Holiday picture. A loss to the Crimson
Tide would make LSU the SEC cham-
pions and Auburn would go to the Liber-
ty Bowl.

"With Auburn out, that moves
Michigan into the number-one
position," said Holiday Bowl executive
director John Reid. Asked if this means
he will be giving the Wolverines an in-
vitation, Reid answered, "We would
hope to."
THE OFFICIAL bids to this winter's
bowl games cannot be extended until
this Saturday at 6:00 p.m., but things

Bowl
appear pretty well set for a trip to San
Diego for Michigan on Dec. 21.
"We would accept a bid if they gave it
to us," said athletic director Don
Canham last night. "We have a pretty
good idea that they're going to invite
us.,'
This has to be great news for Bo
See WOLVERINES, Page 3

Bowl bid won't bring
California migration

By DOV COHEN
While the Wolverines are ea cted to
accept their invitation to the -liday
Bowl in San Diego on December the
last day of finals, most profe. rs
probably won't have to worry abot a
mass migration to California teavm
their classrooms empty.
For $350 - the approximate cost of a
roundtrip plane ticket to San Diego -
"the student market would rather sit
home and spend their money on beer,"
said Fred Sanchez of Great Places
travel agency.
GREAT PLACES flew about 400

students to the Rose Bowl in 1981, but is
expecting less than 20 for this year's
bowl, Sanchez said.
"If it were the Rose Bowl it might be
a different story," said LSA junior John
Holler, president of the Trigon frater-
nity. "I'm pretty sure nobody from our
house is going. The Holiday Bowl is a
,retty blah bowl."
The Acacia house which ususally
ds about 50 percent of it's members
tG 9 Rose Bowl, will send "only one or
tw.. en this year," said Bern Hughes,
a music school senior.
"THE GUYS got more into the Rose
See HOLIDAY, Page 2

Shoes for evacueesAssociated Press
A homeless child is fitted for shoes at a Mexico City sports center yesterday
where survivors of Monday's gas explosion are housed. The blast left 544
dead and thousands were left homeless in one of the nation's worst disasters.
See in Brief, Page 2.

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'U' alcohol
report seeks
education of
staff, students

By ARONA PEARLSTEIN
Alcohol use and abuse recently has come back
into the nation's eye as efforts by special in-
terest groups have attempted to educate
others about the dangers of alcohol.
The University is no exception. Because of
vandalism damage to residence halls as well as
concern for members of the University com-
munity, a special task force has studied use of
alcohol on campus and made recommen-
dations concerning the problem.
THE 34-PAGE report, a result of eight mon-
ths of study, emphasizes the importance of
responsible drinking, and the recommen-
dations are aimed at creating more awareness

about alcohol use and abuse.
The report proposes five strategies to
promote responsible drinking:
" education on alcohol use and abuse;
" creation of an environment in the residence
halls and throughout the University com-
munity that promotes responsible drinking;
" treatment and support for alcoholism and
alcohol-related problems;
" research on student attitudes and
behaviors related to alcohol; and
" making alcohol education and responsible
drinking a way of life at the University.
Education of both staff and students plays an,
important role in the goals of the report. In-

cluded in these educational strategies are
placing information centers in the dorm
libraries, holding awareness programs for new
students, and establishing guidelines for staff
behavior regarding alcohol.
"Educating people is a good start in handling
any type of social or health problem," said
Keith Bruhnsen, assistant coordinator of the
Faculty and Staff Assistance Program.
"Alcohol-related diseases are the second
leading cuase of health problems in the United
States today.... Courses should be offered."
Although many students begin drinking
before they, come to the University, the report
says a campus setting "may be the final oppor-

tunity to intervene in a pattern of behavior that
may have devastating results for the student
and for others as well."
EDUCATION efforts also include training of
residence hall staff to help them deal more ef-
fectively with alcohol problems. Many of the
resident advisors are not much older than the
residents, but Bruhnsen said that is not
necessarily a disadvantage.
"The peer counselor model has been effective
at other universities," he said. "Students with
a problem tend to seek out someone of the same
age and lifestyle."
Bruhnsen added that training RAs who see
students often can aid in identifying early signs
See TEETOTALLING, Page 3

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Economic growth slows to
1.9%; recession feared

WASHINGTON - U.S. economic growth from July
through September slumped to its lowest pace since the last
recession, the government said yesterday, largely because
consumers are curbing spending, but buying more abroad.
The Commerce Department said the gross national
product - the country's total output of goods and services -
grew at a sluggish 1.9 percent during the third quarter.
THIS REPRESENTED a marked drop from growth in the
first half of the year, when the economy zoomed along at
rates of 10.1 percent in the first quarter and 7.1 percent in the
second quarter.
In another sign of economic weakness, the government
also said housing construction fell by 9.8 percent in October,
putting starts at an annual rate of 1.52 million units, the
lowest since December 1982.
The Reagan administration called the slowdown in growth
temporary and predicted an upturn by the first of next year,
but many private economists warned of rising unem-
ployment and a growing threat of a recession.
DEPUTY WHITE House press secretary Marlin Fitzwater
said the slowdown was made more pronounced by the
American and Candian auto strikes but that most economists
are expecting "a return to moderate growth next year."
But Allen Sinai, chief economist, at Sherson Lehman-
TODAY-
TGI Thanksgiving
though most students will take to the highway
some time today for their once per term visit
home, those that stay won't be exiled to a
weekend of solitude. For starters the University

American Express, said, "This is another indication that the
economy is weaker than expected. It is very clear that we
have a growth recession and maybe something worse."
Sinai placed the odds of an outright recession now at one in
four. He said that the drop in interest rates that occurred af-
ter Labor Day should act to rejuvenate the economy but not
until February or March.
"ONCE THE momentum of growth slows, it is very hard to
reverse it quickly," he said. "There should be some upticks
in the unemployment rate in the next couple of months."
Sinai said growth in the current quarter could dip as low as
1.5 percent with other analysts forecasting growth at 2 per-
cent or below.
The commerce report blamed the third quarter GNP
slowdown primarily on a drop in consumer spending and the
country's worsening trade deficit.
While personal consumption spending was advancing at an
annual rate of 7.9 percent in the second quarter, that increase
had slowed to 0.6 percent in the third quarter.
But foreign imports increased at annual rate of 55.5 per-
cent in the third quarter, compared with an 8 percent pace in
the second quarter. U.S. sales were also up, but at a much
slower rate of 8.8 percent compared to a decline of 0.5 percent
in the second quarter. The high dollar has been blamed for
what will be the country's worst trading year in history.

Associated Press

No intelligent life here
Illinois Gov. James Thompson along with other state officials inspect a toxic waste dump on Chicago's South Side
yesterday as a part of a $20 million cleanup program.

Hey Neighbor
I T WAS a beautiful day in the neighborhood yesterday as the
Smithsonian Institution accepted a bright .red cardigan
sweater from Mister Rogers, the kindest, coziest and least
excitable host on daytime television. The zippered sweater,
familiar to preschool viewers of the daily "Mister Rogers'
Neighborhood" program, will join Archie Bunker's wing
chair, a Kermit the Frog puppet and other memorable ob-
jects on display at the National Museum of American
History later this year. "We get railroad trains and
Stradivariuses and tap shoes. But this one is a friendly ar-

neighborly day in the neighborhood... Won't you be my
neighbor?" He replaces his jacket with a sweater, sheds his
shoes in favor of sneakers, and gets down to business - a
tour of an applesauce factor, a look at some animals, a trip
to the neighborhood of Make-Believe. The sweater, Rogers
said Tuesday, is a symbol that "I'm going to stay awhile.
Let's just settle in and have at least a half-hour visit
together." "You're welcome to a pair of sneakers," he told
a swarm of amused Smithsonian officials who wore
sweaters in his honor. Rogers, an ordained Presbyterian
minister, said his program is aimed at "children, wounded
people, people who may feel they don't have much to give. I

tournament, sponsored by Parker Brothers, makers of
Monopoly, attracted thousands of entrants. Forbes earned
$4,692, equal toone year's rent on all the properties on the
Monopoly board. Runnerups each walked away with prizes
equal to one year's rent in Monopoly's high-rent district.
Forbes, who described himself as a life-long board game
player, said he had a winning strategy to pass on to millions
of Monopoly players around the world. "Every game is
completely different," he said. "You have to go with the
dice for the first 15 to 30 minutes and then develop your
strategy." Monopoly will turn 50 years old next year. The
game has been translated into 18 languages and Parker

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