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October 26, 1984 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-10-26

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See Weekend Magazine

Ninety-five Years - ~
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~Partly cloudy with scattered
Editria Fredomshowers and a high near 65.
Vol. XCV, No. 44 Copyright 1984, The Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan - Friday, October 26, 1984 Fifteen Cents Twelve Pages

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nation's

Daily Photo by CAROL L. FRANCAVILLA
Diagonal duel
Supports of President Reagan encounter opposition yesterday on the steps of the graduate library as they celebrate the
first anniversary of the invasion of Grenada. Among the supporters' cheers was "Four more years" which elicited the
response "Two more weeks" from the opposition. See story page 2.

WASHINGTON (AP) - Chemical
contamination of underground water
supplies has closed more than 1,000
water wells, affects every state in the
nation, and, over the long run,
threatens the water supplies of half the
nation's population, a study said
yesterday.
The report by the congressional Of-
fice of Technology Assessment said the
problem, a hidden and gradual
pollution that seldom makes headlines,,
is bad and getting worse because state
and federal laws and programs do not
adequately protect underground water
supplies.
Sen. David Durenberger (R-Minn.)
who released the report, said he
believes groundwater contamination
"will be the principal environmental
concern for the rest of this decade."
"GROUNDWATER pollution is not
yet a fashionable issue," he said.
"The nation doesn't know much about
it. Its effects are less obvious than those
of acid rain. It is not reflected in wilting
trees or dead fish.
But Durenberger added, 'It is a mat-
ter of human health. We are dealing
with a resource that supplies drinking
water one one-half of this nation's
population."
THE REPORT adds to a growing file
of studies indicating that groundwater
pollution is fast becoming one of the
strike
until university officials threatened
them with suspension.
Also Wednesday, the universtiy
rejected a proposal by Local 34 leaders
of the Federation of University Em-
ployees that said clerical and technical
workers would return to work if the
university established a three-
professor binding arbitration panel.
FINNERTY called the union's
proposal "an attemplt to move the
process away from direct bargaining
across the negotiating table."
Union spokeswoman Lucille Dickess
said the union was "disappointed and
outraged," but not surprised by the
Yale position.
No new negotiating sessions are
scheduled.
The workers, who walked out Sept.
25, earn an average Qf $13,424 a year.
The strikers want a 26 percent across -
the-board increase over three years
and Yale is offering 17.1 percent. Two
negotiating sessions have been held
since the walkout.

most important pollution theats facing
the United States.
Early this month, the House Gover-
nment Operations Committee released
a study concluding that groundwater is
among the most vulnerable to con-
tamination of all natural resources and
that "significant portions of it are being
damaged and its usefulness destroyed"
by man-made pollution.
Rep. Mike Synar (D-Okla.), chair-
man of the Government Operations en-
vironment subcommittee, said then
that the solution to a coming water
crisis "may be more elusive and expen-
sive than the energy crisis."
AND THE Environmental Protection
Agency, in a draft report scheduled for
release early next year, says the states
are failing in their responsibility to en-
sure that toxic waste dumps are
monitored for groundwater con-
tamination.
The draft report, obtained yesterday,
says EPA's desire to delegate
monitoring responsibilities to the states
"has resulted in authorizing many
states that were ill-prepared to im-
plement the program."
But the new, 244-page report by OTA,
a non-partisan analytical arm of
Congress, provides perhaps the most
comprehensive summary of the

problem and of the challenge of dealing
with it.
THE RESOURCES affected are the
huge underground water reservoirs,
called aquifers, that underlie much of
the country and which now provide
more than 90 billion gallons of water a
day to surface users.
More than half the nation depends on
groundwater for its drinking wter, in-
cluding more than 80 percent of rural
families.
But the aquifers are increasingly
becoming contaminated, Durenberger
said in releasing the report, with some
cases of contamination now reported in
every state in the nation.
One 1983 study identified 2,820 wells
nationwide that have been closed or af-
fected by contamination, he said. The
Congressional Research Service, in an
earlier report, said more than 4,000
private, public and industrial wells
have been closed or damaged because
of contamination.
Despite those figures, OTA said it
believed only a small portion of the
nation's total underground water sup-
plies are contaminated - perhaps 1 to 2
percent. But it added that detailed
estimates of the extent of pollution "are
not now, and probably never will be,
available."

Students sue

Yale over

From AP and UPl
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) - Studen-
ts at Yale University filed suit yester-
day against the Ivy League school,
seeking at least $10 million for damages
they say they suffered as a result of a
month-long strike by 1,600 white collar
workers.
The class action suit, filed by 102
students, claims the strike disrupted
services and "destroyed the at-
mosphere of collegiality and intellec-
tual inquiry which induced students to
attend Yale."
It seeks compensatory damages of
$1.4 million per week plus unspecified
punitive damages for the duration of
the strike, a total of $10 million to date.
The aim of the suit is to convince Yale
to move from its refusal to meet the
union's demands or submit the dispute
to binding arbitration spokesman Tom
Keenan said Wednesday:
"We hope the threat of $10 million in
damages will prod (Yale) toward a
more flexible bargaining position,"
Keenan said. "We figure that if'

Demand $10 million for
lost services and hardship

they're concerned about money, this
will get them to listen."
"Personally, I strongly support the
union's fight for fair wages, but that's
not what this lawsuit is about," said
second-year law student Ian Ayres.
"It's about the fact that if Yale isn't
going to provide the services that we
paid for, undergraduates, graduates
and professional students deserve to
get their money back."
AYRES SAID the suit arose when
several undergraduates approached
law school students and suggested the
interruption of services was illegal.
Named as defendants are Yale

University President Bartlett Giamat-
ti, Vice President Michael Finnerty,
and Treasurer John Buckman.
University spokesman Steve
Kezerian was not in his office this mor-
ning and did not return telephone calls
seeking comment on Yale's reaction to
the lawsuit.
THE SUIT culminates a series of
student complaints over strike-related
conditions.
Yale students have refused all week
to leave university libraries at closing
time to protest limited library hours
caused by the strike. On Wednesday
night, students used flashlights to study

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Prince
Crisler
show still
possible

From staff reports
The University's Major Events Office
is now negotiating with rock star Prince
and a Crisler Auditorium performance
is still "within the realm of possibility,"
said MEO director Kevin Gilmartin.
"Prince is not a stranger to Ann Ar-
bor. In the past, he sold out Hill
Auditorium and Crisler Arena,"
Gilmartin said yesterday. "We've been
talking to the tour managers since
early summer, and the tour manager
expressed an interest in coming back."
SOURCES at MEO said on Wed-

nesday that Prince was considering a
performance at Crisler either before or
immediately following his seven Joe
Louis Arena shows beginning Nov. 4.
According to Howard Bloom Agency,
the New York firm that handles Prin-
ce's publicity, however, Prince is now
booked for concerts throughout the
midwest for all dates in November.
Although Gilmartin said he had no
specific information, he speculated that
an engagement could be scheduled for
December, late January, or March.

"I will probably know by the end of
the month if my timetable is correct,"
he said.
This tour comes not on the heels of
Prince's most successful album to date,
Purple Rain. It has been labeled the
Purple Rain Revue, in hopes of main-
taining the largely white crossover
audience that flocked to the film. Princ-
e's latest protege, Shiela E., will open.
This will be the public's first oppor-
tunity to see if Shiela E. can back up her
video and recorded success with strong
performance.

S um kins Daily Photo by CAROL L. FRANCAVILLA
Phi Gamma De ta raternity member Brian Gahan, an LSA sophomore,
peddles pumpkins to passersby outside the Union yesterday morning. The
fraternity, along with Chi Omega sorority, is helping to raise funds for the
National Institute for Burn Medicine.

.... ...... ..... ............... .. ....... .......... ......... ................................................................................................:::::::;.....:.w ::.::.................; :G: i:.::..........; i}:::::::::: i: : "i i'fi:: :J:'i:.i}iS::"::: is i'.?i]:: :: i:"iii: n::J:ti :% J:vti:"'".'jj'i'4:iv: iY.v:: t.
..............v............................... ... ........ ...:.... ....... ...........: ... ....... .. ... ..:.................._........................................................... .................................... .....

TODAY-
Making women squirm

a large volume of mail about WORMS but not one negative
response, even though most of the letters are from women.
Most of the women "like to be treated as ladies," Mrs. Fen-
ton said. She added that her husband is not against women.
"He doesn't care if they climb telephone poles" at work
during the day, she said, "(but) at 5 p.m. he thinks they
should be women." Response to WORMS has been so over-
whelming that the Fentons are running out of WORMS sup-
plies and considering holding a national convention.
Students at the University of Texas-El Paso want to start a
local chapter there, and Bob Fenton has been interviewed

presidential picks in their times, but in today's media age,
they'd have flopped, a history professor says. If you took
Washington "and put him on television, he would have
made Walter Mondale, on his worst and stiffest day, look, if
you'll pardon the expression, like the 'Great Com-
municator,' " said Thomas Kelly, professor of American
History at Siena College in Albany, N.Y. Lincoln, who "was
considered by some to be even uglier before he grew the.
beard," also would have a hard time, Kelly said recently.
"His high-pitched, piercing voice probably would have
sounded auite badly on television and radio." he said. "And

Boxed in
T HE TIGERS and chimpanzees were passed over for a
38-year-old homo sapien reading the newspaper at the
Miami's Metrozoo, where a novel Urban Man exhibit in-
trigued throngs of visitors last weekend. "This has been,
beyond a shadow of a doubt, the most popular exhibit
we've ever had at the zoo," said Metrozoo Marketing
Director Rick Hensler. "We've had people standing there
for hours and hours." The crowds jostled to see Albert
Vidal, a Spanish mime paid $10,000 for the weekend stint,

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