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October 19, 1984 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-10-19
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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COVER
Bonanza? Pages 3-4
While perhaps not as visible as LS& A or the
engineering school, the University's business school
is an important part of the environment. Nationally
it consistently ranks as one of the top two and it is
growing rapidly to accommodate its large pool of
qualified candidates. But all is not bliss in Business
mainly because of fierce competition and heavy
course loads. The cover photo is of Business School
Dean Gilbert Whittaker by Daily photo editor Doug
McMahon.
ENTERTAINMENTS
Happenings Pages s- 8
A complete guide to the Ann Arbor entertainment
community featuring quick reviews of both current
and second run films as well as an extensive list of the
various divertisements around the city. Also, Eats
and Drinks is a handy guide to dining for both the
visitor and long-time resident of the city.

MOVIES

RESTAURANTS

Avast, blaggards Page 9
Don't be fooled by its title, The Black Pirate was
the first feature length color movie. Starring Douglas
Fairbanks, Sr. at his swashbuckling best, the
Michigan Theater's showing also features live or-
chestral accompaniment by the Ann Arbor Chamber
Orchestra and Dennis James. This screening
promises to be one of the cinema highlights of the
term according to Daily reviewer Byron L. Bull.,

Skyscraper, platescraper Page 11l
Windows, above the Ann Arbor Inn, is literally the
height of dining in Ann Arbor. Perched on the highest
floor, the restaurant has an edge on its competition
by being able to offer the best view of the city. And,
accoring to Daily reviewer Randall Stone, its food is
top-notch.as well.

BOOKS

RELEASES
What's New Page 10
The record industry keeps churning out new things
and sometimes it gets tough to keep on top of all of it
all. Recent albums features quick reviews of releases
from the past couple of weeks. This week sees new
album coverage expanding to include heavy metal.

Jam preserved Page 12
Author Paolo Hewitt has written the'story of
England's biggest band during the late '70s, the Jam.
Led by songwriter Paul Weller, the band represented
a biting edge to rock that nevertheless remained in
traditional bounds. The book, while presenting the
essential information, never really challenges
Weller, which according to Daily reviewer Steve
Kaminski is its main fault.

- - -- -

Weekend
Friday. October 19. 1984,
Volume tit. Issue 6
Magazine Editor..,................. Joseph Kraus
Associate Magazine Editors.......Paula Dohring
John Logie
Arts Editors....... . .............Fannie Weinstein
Pete Williams
Weekend Marketing Coordinator . . . Lisa Schatz

Associate Arts Editors ................ Jeff Frooman
Andy Weine
Movies............... ......Byron L. Bull
Books................................ Mark Kulkis
Records...........................Dennis Harvey
Sales Manager................Debbie Dioguardi
Assistant Sales Manager.............. Laurie Truske
Sales Representatives:
Ellen Abrahams, Mark Bookman, Steve
Casciani, Peter Giangreco, Seth Grossman,
Mary Ann Hogan, Mark Stobbs

Weekend is edited and managed by students on the
staff of the Michigan Daily at 420 Maynard, Ann Ar-
bor, Michigan Daily 48109.
Weekend, (313) 763-0379 and 763-0371; Michigan
Daily, 764-0552; Circulation, 764-0558; Display Adver-
tising, 764-0554.

Copyright

1984, The Michigan

Daily.

WE'LL MAKE YOUR WATCH
RUN LIKE NEW
- 0
AND LOOK LIKE'
NEW
A watch that runs like new should look the part.
And nothing does the job better than a stylish
watchband from Speidel. Speidel - originators of
famous Twist-O-Flex" watchband construction. Just
the thing to give new life to an old watch.
Authorized Dealer

Top of
the town
Windows
Huron and 4th Ave.
Hours: Monday - Thursday 1 1 a.m. -
2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. - 10 p.m.;
Friday I1 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. and
5 p.m. - 11 p.m.; Saturday 5 p.m.
-11 p.m.
By Randall Stone
MMOM AND dad are coming for a
visit. They tell you to make
reservations at a nice restaurant where
they can take you and your friend out
for dinner. You think first of Ann Ar-
bor's well-established, traditional
restaurants, but for a less conventional
evening, you may want to try WIN-
DOWS.
Perched atop the Ann Arbor Inn
is Windows, a relatively new ad-
dition to Ann Arbor's collection of
restaurants. Normally things don't run
too smoothly in newly-opened
restaurants. Surprisingly, this was
not the case at WINDOWS, which has
been open less than a year.
This accomplishment is due largely
to the high quality, well-trained staff.
For example, the waiter's knowledge of
the items on the menu was commen-
dable. The service may not have been
typical because the restaurant was not
very busy, but the waiter was very at-
tentive without being intrusive.
Adjoining the restaurant is a cocktail
lounge where there is live music most
nights. The music itself was not objec-
tionable, but it was a bit too loud, even
in the dining room. The restaurant is
tastefully decorated in earth tones and
it is accented with etched glass and
polished brass. Appropriately spaced
tables help the pleasant decor, which is
highlighted by an excellent view of the
city.
A glance at the extensive menu
makes it clear that Windows
specialty is continental fare. Seafood,
fowl and veal dishes dominate the
selection. A wide array of sauces and
some unique ingredients help to
assure pleasantly unconventional food.
As you can probably guess, fine con-
tinental food implies fine continental
prices. Main dishes run from $10 to
$14.50; most entrees cost about $13.
The wine list also is impressive with
selections ranging in price from $8 to $90
per bottle.
Several appetizers grace the menu.
The bay shrimp cocktail was good, but
not great. The shrimp were sweet and
flavorful, but they were so tiny that
they drowned in the cocktail sauce. The
main course was preceded by a bread
basket and a tossed salad. Homemade
honey butter and herb butter was
provided, but it was wasted on
mediocre french bread. Unique.
dressings such as brandy french and
creamy garlic helped to create a
refreshing salad.
The entrees turned out to be the
meal's biggest success. Truly tender
pork tenderloin was the foundation of
the Pork Medallions, Chantrelles. A

The view: Sightsee while you eat
cream sauce containing bacon, onion,
and highly-touted chantrelles
mushrooms accompanied the meat per-
fectly. The Roast Long Island Duckling,
Madagascar was delicious, although it
was not as tender as it could have been.
Covered with a pleasant sauce made.
with cassis, it was accented with green
pepper corns and kiwi fruit. Even the
broccoli served with the meal was

prepared for the continental palate. It
was very crisp and was accompanied
by a walnut sauce.
A choice of numerous desserts was
available, but the rich sauces and am-
ple portions made them easy to avoid. A
cup of good, strong coffee was all that
was required to complete a wonderful
meal.

WAYFARER
The original! Our number
one selling style. Choose
black, red, white or tor-
toise-like frame.
List $4000
CATS
Newest look on the slopes.
Black, brown, or white with
gray lenses. Add $15 for
Ambermatic. $35
List $45. $3

I

WIND
special c
pus and
it a grea
and a go
Realize,
tinental c
meat-an
for some
take a pe

OLYMPIAN
Black frame with gold bar
trim. The hottest style on
the east coast.
Save bigi
List $55.
GLACIER
Leather side flaps protect
agans glareNylon frame.
Black brown or blue with
es.Add$ 1$3
fo mermatic. )Q

* Three Great Reasons To See
* "REVOLUTIOI
GHOSTS
Opening Tonight at Me
GREAT MUSIC-Lively and beautiful
GREAT MESSAGE-Change has hap
can happen again
GREAT PRICES-$5 Fri. and Sat. at 8
OCTOBER 19, 20
* This weekend only in Mendels
at the Michigan Lea
A FULL SCALE MUSICAL P
ALMOST THE COST OF A
Presented by Canterbury Hou

Amrbermadi
... Change with the Weather!
over]c ast sunny, brown on
days warm sunny
days

For a minute there, things were looking pretty desperate.
Fortunately for the Count, our kitchen's kept busy baking the Count's
Ultimo pizza from morning 'til night. Rolling out the dough for our
thick, crispy crust. Cooking up the Count's rich, spicy sauce.
Grating mounds of fresh muenster cheese. And slicing the ham, pepperoni,
sausage, mushrooms, peppers, olives, and onions we pile on top.
Luckily, the fresh Ultimo arrived in the nick of time, and everybody was happy.
The Count even gave up his share in favor of the Vegetarian pizza. just to
show there were no hard feelings.
Little did the Count know he'd gotten the last slice...

CLASSIC AVIATOR
All time favorite! Gold or
black frame with gray
lenses. Add $15 for Amber-
matic.
L $47 . 3 7
List $47
SHOOTER
Gold or black frame with
gray lenses. Add $15
for Ambermatic (gold
frame only).
List $57. $45

OUTDOORSMAN
Wraps around ears. Gold or
black frame with gray
lenses. Add $15
for Ambermatic.
List $50.
OUTDOORSMAN it
Larger lenses than Out-
doorsman. No ear wraps.
Gold or black Add $15 for
Ambermatic.
List $55. $44

I

AY .L)
FOR
ME~
213 MAIN STREET " ANN ARBOR, MICHIG

d

To Order: Mail check or Visa/Mastercard account information, in-
ciuding $2 per pair shipping and insurance. Guaranteed satisfaction.
MI residents add 4% sales tax. Send 506 for catalog.
Halkosphere Enterprises
P.O. Box 1461 "Royal Oak, MI 48068

2 , Weke ~~ '

4wegkepd/F64
--------------

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