100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 19, 1984 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 19, 1984
Shapiro urges Reagan to sign

TA tax bill

IN BRIEF

By ERIC MATTSON
Special to the Daily
DEARBORN - University President Harold
Shapiro yesterday told the University Regents that
he telegrammed President Reagan urging him to
support a law restoring tax-exempt status to teaching
assistants' tuition waivers.
The law, which has already passed the House and
Senate and awaits Reagan's signature, would renew
the tax-exempt status teaching assistants enjoyed on
their tuition waivers before last January, when
Congress failed to approve an Internal Revenue
Service regulation allowing the exemption.
THE UNIVERSITY has since withheld about $75 a
month in taxes from the one-third discount teaching
assistants received on their tuition.
In other action at the Dearborn session of yester-
day's regents meeting, Student Legal Services attor-
Regents clash

ney Jonathan Rose again condemned the student
code of non-academic conduct, which would regulate
students' behavior outside the classroom.
"The code and (judicial) system, I think, are very
dangerous," Rose said. "We don't have to choose
between order and freedom in our community."
ROSE, WHO said he is planning on leaving Student
Legal Services soon, suggested two ways the ad-
ministration could deal with problem students
without using a code.
First, he said, the administration could talk infor-
mally with the student, and recommend that he seek
counseling or pay restitution for damages he caused.
If a compromise cannot be reached or if the alleged
offense is very serious, Rose said, the University
should take the case to court.
The regents also decided to ask for $14.7 million in-
state aid for capital improvements next year. Projec-
ts in the request include the new engineering building

on North Campus, renovations for the Chemistry
Building, and renovation of the Natural Science
building.
Robert Warner, Archivist of the United States, was
appointed dean of the University's School of Library
Science. Warner, a former professor of history and
library science at the University, will assume the
positon next April.
The regents also appointed Prof. Dee Edington to
head the newly created Division of Physical
Education which will replace the Department of
Physical Education in the School of Education. The
new division will report directly to the vice president
for academic affairs instead of being part of any par-
ticular college.
The regents held the afternoon portion of their
meeting in Dearborn to mark the 25th anniversary of
the University's campus there.

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Canadan strike may affect U.S.
TORONTO - General Motors of Canada workers picketed the company's
13 plants yesterday on the second day of a strike that could force layoffs in
the parent firm's U.S. operations.
Negotiators for both sides were meeting at a Toronto hotel mulling local
plant issues but there were no plans for so called master bargaining talks in a
new national contract for 36,000 workers, who belong to the Canadian branch
of the United Auto Workers union.
The strike, the first to hit Canada's largest carmaker in 14 years, began at
noon EDT Wednesday after the expiration of a deadline set by the union for
reaching a tentative agreement. The previous two-year contract expired
Sept. 14.
GM officials in Detroit said the strike would begin affecting American
plants dependent on parts produced by Canadian facilities by the end of this
week or the beginning of next.
They said at least nine American GM factories would have to be closed,
but were unable to say how many jobs would be affected.

0

with faculty over free zone

(Continued from Page1)

said Cohen,

, who teaches philosophy in

AND WHILE Bassett and Axelrod
said arms reductions will help prevent
a nuclear war, Prof. Carl Cohen told the
regents that the only way to reduce the
threat of war is to increase the stock-
piling.
"I don't know who is correct, and it is
the essence of this act to foreclose the
question under the assumption that the
answer ... is known with certainty,"

the Residential College.
Cohen charged that the proposal is a
"pernicious"~ attempt to use criminal
and civil law to suppress some types of in-
tellectual inquiry. The ban will cause
some professors to steer clear of con-
troversial research and drive others
from the campus and the city, he said.
"THE CHILL imposed by the
possibility of criminal or civil action is

MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY NEEDS YOU!
Positions are now available on the following Regental and University Committees:
HONORS CONVOCATION - Three students needed
RESEARCH POLICIES - One grad student needed
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION - One grad student needed
MILITARY OFFICER EDUCATION PROGRAM - One student needed
INSURANCE - Four students needed
STOP BY THE MSA OFFICE FOR A FULL LISTING OF OPEN COMMITTEE POSITIONS.
APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE NOW.
DEADLINE for submitting applications is TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, '84
5:00 P.M.
INTERVIEWS WILL BE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1984
For more information contact Laurie Clement, 3039 Michigan Union, 763-3241

widely understood," Cohen said. "It
has always been a central weapon in
the armament of those who would sup-
press inquiry."
Regent Deane Baker (R-Ann Arbor)
agreed with Cohen. "I come down on
the side that freedom must be
unrestrained," he said.
Medical School Prof. James Neel told
the regents that he opposes the free.
zone proposal even though he has
worked extensively for the nuclear
freeze.
"THE BANNING of any kind of ac-
tivity by local government.. is a slip-
pery slope open to all kinds of abuse"
he said.
The scope of the ban is far broader
than most people realize, said Regent
Thomas Roach (D-Saline). "I would
have to urge everyone. . . to read the
fine print," he told the group.
The ballot question is full of "weasel
words," Roach said, such as the clause
which would exclude basic research as
long as its "primary purpose" is not the
development or use of nuclear weapons
or delivery systems.
"IN TODAY'S environment, I don't
know that any one of us, or any of you
can draw a clear line between basic and
applied research," Roach told the
professors.
The ban, for example, could prevent

You are warmly invited to attend a public lecture on Christian Science healing... .
Tou Canst Be Cut Off From God
Sunday, October 21, 1984 4:00 p.m.

Ann C. Stewart, C.S.B., member of the Christian Science
Board of Lectureship, will speak on this subject.
Admission to this lecture is free. Free

at First Church of Christ, Scientist, Ann Arbor
1833 Washtenaw Avenue
parking and child care orovided.

i,.., ., .b ...... ............... ., ..........

aeronautical engineering students from
doing any work on military aircraft and
naval architecture students from desi-
ning military ships and submarines,
Roach said.
Moreover, the ban could stall high
technology research in Ann Arbor and
its surrounding areas, ultimately
threatening the recovery of the state's
economy, he said.
DURING pointed questioning,
Regent Paul Brown (D-Petoskey)
asked Axelrod why Ann Arbor voters
should have the right to decide the ac-
tivities of a state-owned school.
Axelrod said the nuclear freeze
movement is easiest to launch on the
local level. But Brown interrupted him,
saying "University plolicy comes from
the regents, not from the citizens of Ann
Arbor who vote in an election."
Regent Sarah Power (D-Ann Arbor)
added that she doubted banning nuclear
weapons research in the city would
have any impact on the nationwide
freeze movement.
And Power said the University may
ultimately be compromising its newly -
won right to pursue ideas outside the
social norm by taking stands on
political and moral issues.
She referred to an editorial written
last summer by University President
Harold Shapiro for Science magazine
that concluded a university "remains a
creative part of society only as long as
it remains an intellectually open com-
munity and not the ally of a particular
point of view."
Haig accuses
Soviets of
influencing
debates
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (UPI) -
Former Secretary of State Alexander
Haig said yesterday the interview
Soviet President Konstantin Chernenko
granted the Washington Post was timed
to influence Sunday's presidential
debate.
"Clearly the timing of his little
dissertation, coming a few weeks
before a national election and a few
days before the foreign policy debate,
could lead one to be a little suspicious,"
Haig said.
Chernenko's unusual face-to-face in-
terview with the newspaper's Moscow
correspondent resulted in an article in
which Chernenko indicated progress on
any one of four Soviet nuclear arms
proposals could lead to positive talks
between the two superpowers.
Haig was in Grand Rapids to serve as
a consultant to the Amway Corp. and
address the World Affairs Council. He
said it is foolish for people to believe the
cooling of relations between the two
countries is related to President
Reagan's sometimes harsh statements
about the Soviets.
TR-SHIRT
'PRINTNQ
Ann Arbor's fastest!
From 10-800 T-shirts screenprint-
ed within 24 hours of order.
Multi-color printing our specialty.
You supply art or use our expert
design staff.
Hundreds of surplus T-shirts only
$2. each. Located Oehnd the Bnd Pg Cafe
208 Fi E rstSt Phone T94-1357
-"

I-' woi.
14NN AR il3oW

Salvadoran rebels renew attacks
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador - Leftist guerrilla threats kept traffic off
El Salvador's major highways yesterday - three days after the first peace
talks between rebels and the government - and bombings left some towns
without electricity.
No explanation was given by the rebels for their renewed attacks, which
led to scattered skirmishes with the army. There were no reports of
casualties.
The nation's two major highways, the Pan American and the Coastal, and
accessory roads were virtually deserted after the guerrillas' clandestine
Radio Venceremos repeated an earlier warning that rebel troops would be
intercepting drivers.
"No vehicle, public or private, should circulate starting in the early hours
of Thursday, the 18th of October," until further notice, the rebels said in an
early morning broadcast.
The guerrillas have issued such-warnings against traffic periodically in
the past. Some previous warnings have said that any vehicle could be sub-
ject to attack, although there was no such specific threat yesterday.
Personal income and sending up
WASHINGTON - The nation's personal income climed a healthy 0.9 per-
cent in September and, in a significant turnaround, consumers started spen
ding again in a big way after a lifeless summer, the Commerce Department
said yesterday.
The large 14 percent increase in personal spending - the biggest jump.
since April - followed a slight decline in August, no change at all in July and
a weak 0.3 percent increase in June.
The figures suggested consumers are armed with ample income and
enough enthusiasm to spark an economic rebound during the Christmas
season, despite the current economic slowdown.
But factory incomes suffered in September, the report showed, just as in-
dustrial employment, production and use of capacity also fell off in three
other government reports for the month.
Early 'snowstorms last Utah
The earliest and heaviest snowstorm on record yesterday buried Salt Lake
City with 22 inches of snow that knocked out power to as many as 15,000
people, closed schools, made a mess of highways and caused a 50-car pileup
that injured 17 people.
The stormy weather has claimed at least two lives, one in a traffic ac-
cident in Colorado during the week's first storm and one in an avalanche
Wednesday. In addition, two mountain climbers found dead in California
may have died from exposure.
The newest storm approaching from the Pacific threatened to dump as
much as a foot of snow on northern California, and winter storm watches
were posted for last night and today for California's Sierra Nevada and
Nevada's Lake Tahoe basin.
The snow around Utah's Salt Lake City was the heaviest on record there
for October, and the 16.5 inches at the airport as of 10 a.m. Thursday was the
second heaviest 24-hour snowfall ever, said National Weather Service
meterologist William Adler.
All the schools in Salt Lake City were closed - as well as many others
countywide.
Molester faces new charges
OREGON, Ill. - A bicycle racing coach twice convicted of child molesting,
was held yesterday on $500,000 bond on charges of sexually assaulting as
many as 20 young boys in what investigators say could be one of the biggest
child molestation cases against one person.
Richard Grigsby, 41, met his victims through his association with a BMX
bicycle team, gaining confidence of boys' parents and traveling with the
boys to races in neighboring states, Batavia Police Chief F. Shellie Reed
said.
"He was traveling with groups of kids under the pretense his son was on
the team also," Reed said, noting that Grigsby had no son of his own.
"Whether it was fear or shame (by the boys) no one had ever come to us
before. We didn't find any real evidence of open threats, like he was going to
beat the kids, but there was a subtle type of brainwashing."
Grigsby was convicted in 1977 of molesting a boy in Woodstock and served
nearly four years in the Menard Correctional Facility, Reed said. He also
was convicted in 1975 of taking indecent liberties with a child in Jefferson,
Wis., and was placed on probation for two years.
Vol. XCV -No. 38
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967X) is published Tuesday through Sunday
during the Fall and Winter terms and Tuesday through Saturday during the
Spring and Summer terms by students at the University of Michigan. Sub-
scription rates: September through April - $16.50 in Ann Arbor; $29.00
outside the city; May through August - $4.50 in Ann Arbor, $6.00 outside the
city. Second-class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. Postmaster: Send
address changes to The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndi-
cate and'College Press Service, and United Students Press Service.

.r

..

.r

I-

hi

A THIN LINE
SEPARATES
LOVE,
FROM HATE,
SUCCESS
FROM FAILURE,
LIFE FROM
DEATH.
A LINE AS
DIFFICULT
TO WALK
AS A
RAZORS EDGE.
a yT
R \ Z R S E D G E
J I-
THE STORY OF ONE MAN'S SEARCH
FOR HIMSELF.
COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS
A MARCUCCI-COHEN-BENN PRODUCTON A JOHN BYRUM FILM

I~

01

Editor in chief ........................ BILL SPINDLE
Managing Editors ..................CHERYL BAACKE
NEIL CHASE
Associate News Editors ............ LAURIE DELATER
GEORGEA KOVANIS
THOMAS MILLER
Personnel Editor... .................SUE BARTO
Opinion Page Editors ................. JAMES BOYD
JACKIE YOUNG
NEWS STAFF: Laura Bischoff, Dov Cohen, Stephanie
DeGroote, Lily Eng, Marcy Fleischer,- Bob Gordon,
Rachel Gottlieb, Thomas Hroch, Gregory Hutton, Sean
Jackson, Carrie Levine, Jerry Markon, Eric Mattson,
Curtis Maxwell, Tracey Miller, Kery Murokomi, Lisa
Powers, Elizabeth Reiskin, Charles Sewell, Don
Swanson, Allison Zousmer.

Sports Editor .

MIKE MCGRAW

01

Associate Sports Editors . . .J..... EFF BERGIDA
KATIE BLACKWELL
PAUL HELGREN
DOUGLAS B. LEVY
STEVE WISE
SPORTS STAFF: Dave Aretha. Mark Borowski. Joe
Ewing. Chris Gerbasi. Jim Gindin. Skip Goodman.
Steve Herz, Rick Kaplan. Tom Keoney. Tim Makinen,
Adam Martin, Scott McKinlay, Barb McQuade. Brad
Morgan, Jerry Muth, Phil Nussel, Mike Redstone.
Scott Solowich, Randy Schwartz. Susan Warner.

Business Manager.........
Advertising Monoger ...... .
Display Monoger..........

.....STEVEN BLOOM
.: MICHAEL MANASTER
..........,..LIZ CARSON

i

Ll

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan