100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1984 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

MSA cod
poster
povokes

e

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 10, 1984 - Page 9
Pests gnaw TV wires

angermi
,dorm RAs
N By LISA POWERS
An angry reaction to a Michigan
Student Assembly poster opposing the
proposed code for non-academic con-
duct forced the assembly last night to
end its use of the poster and have new
ones printed up.
"How would you like a new room-
mate in November?" the posters asked,
referring to the code and its possible
Consequences. Near the middle of the
poster was a phrase which offended
.several resident advisors, including
MSA member Laurie Clements, an RA
at Couzens dormitory.
"DON'T EXPECT your RA to defend
you - his or her boss is the University
administration," the poster daid.
Clements said both RAs and students
saw the poster as implying that RAs
would support the code and not their
residents.
Eric Schnaufer, chairman of the code
committee, said "the intention and
purpose of the poster was to get dorm
residents thinking about how the code
affects their living situation."
"Our poster suggests that RAs will
not be in a formal position to help their
residents when they are brought up un-
der the code," he said. "In fact, RAs
might unfortunately end up enforcing
the code."
Reacting to the RAs anger, Schnaufer
aid the committee "hopes that the
poster does not undermine the RAs'
relationship with their residents.

NEW YORK (AP) - Cable
television, which has faced competition
from the networks for years, is also un-
der attack from the air by squirrels,
chipmunks and other furry creatures
who are chewing through its wires and
profits.
Squirrels, scurrying along cable
wires like trapeze artists, gnaw on the
cords and blur TV reception.
"THEY LIKE to sharpen their teeth
on the cable," said John Kurpinski, an
engineer for Cable Services, Inc. of
Williamsport, Pa.
"Once they penetrate the aluminum
and the mositure gets in, it can have a
devastating effect. The signal quality
deteriorates, and we have to replace it
and splice it."
Kurpinski says squirrels "probably
aren't crazy about the taste, but they
inadvertently swallow enough cable to
end up with a touch of lead poisoning.
You can always identify squirrels who
chew cable: they lose their tail fur."
THE COUNCIL for Cable Infor-

mation has no estimates on financial
damage, but "the problem is con-
siderable, particularly in rural areas
where such predators flourish," said
Kathryn Creech, council president.
"It costs us about $10,000 a year in
manpower hours to repair," said Frank
Adams, maintenance manager for
Viacom Cablevision in suburban
Cleveland. "We have sections of cable
come in where you can see the
squirrels' teeth marks."
Adams says that repair crews, forced
up the poles by the rodents' noshes,
have found ways for revenge.
"Squirrels are nearsighted and they
don't see us until they get real close,"
he said. "So we'd grab the cable stran-
ds and shake it. Those suckers are real
acrobatic, and our guys delight in
seeing them do 360-degree loops around
the wires.
Cable is not the only industry up a
tree about the latest in video violence.
Animals have been tapping into
telephone wires for years.

Daily Photo by DOUG McMAHON
How 'bout those Tigers!
Paul Musante stands at the corner of South University and State Streets selling Detroit Tiger souvenirs yesterday.
Musante described business as "booming" and will return to Tiger Stadium tomorrow. He did not have a prediction for
the outcome of the series, however.
Homecoming mixes old and newl
(Continued from Page 1)1

I

we plan to win the crown back," said member Ken Shields.
But according to Triangle fraternity member Dave.
Holden, his house's entry will be a strong contender. "We're
going to win this year," he said. "This will be the float to end
all floats."
The parade is "open to more than just floats so more people
can participate," Karp said. Those who do not want to build a
float suitable for the Rose Bowl parade can just decorate a
car or walk along the route, she said. .
After the parade- winds its way into the Diag, a pep rally
will begin at 6:45 p.m. In addition to the Michimaniac com-

petition, the rally will feature the Michigan Marching Band,
the Men's Glee Club, and football coach Bo Schembechler.
Another tradition is the Evans Scholars' Car Bash, in
which teams compete to see which can most thoroughly
demolish a car on the Diag. The scholars hope to raise $600
through this event through entry fees and pledges which in-
crease as the damge to the cars increases.
The weekend will end with a UAC-sponsored dance in the
Union Ballroom featuring the band SLK. There will be a cash
bar at the dance, open only to students, staff, and alumni
because of the Union's restricted liquor license.

15ccep t ingDifferences.:
'EveryoneCBen efits"
October 11,1984,.12:00 to 5:00
on the CDGDIY9
Witlt. ..w' rerte s e§ctivitie,5,
Film eFe tiva,
cBarrier ee Theat re, artd
CDiS play artd rrtiformatiort
for more iijormatior call: 763-3000
portsored by': DZi b ed t U del t er vice,
a urIt of Commurtity- er vices/Office ofj8tudertter'vices

Dems say hec
(CPS) - Walter Mondale's suppor- THE REF
ters, seemingly as heartened as they involved wi
are upset by their candidate's recent included sh
reception on college. campuses, are dale speech
Kharging Republicans organized Asked if
tudent disruptions of recent Mondale in the heck
speeches at Southern Cal, the Univer- week said,
sity of Texas at Arlington and the wouldn't do
University of Illinois. be done."
"The evidence is strong to suggest Leadersh
(the heckling and disruption of Mondale Blackwell d
appearances on campuses) is an such tactics
organized political effort," says Bill embarrassi
Morton, president of the National "THE (P
College Democrats in Washington, D.C. were not
"A majority of signs (on different Abramoff,
bcampuses) are very similar," he says. Republican
"Some of the same words are said if you
meisspelled." get involved
A PRIVATE Republican group, the "The peo
leadership Institute, headed by a for- "were a co
rier aide to Ronald Reagan, held a and those w
campaign seminar for young people in bunch of p
Washington in August, and trained dale."
students to disrupt Mondale campaign Abramoff
appearances, contends David Schauer, are not goin
24, who attended the seminar. puses witho
'Schauer, who now works for a THE C
Wpemocratic congressional candidate in protests, he
owa, says students were instructed toward the
hbw to position themselves within dressed as
eowds to draw attention away from some campu
Mondale, how to write placards to tie address at
Mondale to the Jimmy Carter admin- sity last wee
stration, and how to disavow any con- ti-Boredom
nection to the Reagan campaign in the pajamas, a
rocess. coffee to pas
.Schauer has a tape recording of a "That's
seminar session at which an uniden- Brickman
tified female seminar leader - who "(Abramofi
Pondale student coordinator Gary were behind
Brickman says is Reagan-Bush Cam- The actu
'pign Youth Director Liz Pickens - been small.
urges the students to "jusy say 'I'm a Southern Ca
concerned citizen.' Don't say 'I'm with about 100 p
Students for Reagan."' like "Mosc
a unique
opportunity
for

kling G
PUBLICANS deny they are
ith the heckling, which has
outed interruptions of Mon-
es.
his campaign was involved
ling, President Reagan last
"Good lord, no. I wish people
it. It's rude, and it shouldn't
ip Institute head Morton
denies his seminars taught
s, calling them "stupid and
ing."
PEOPLE) from our office
involved," adds Jack
head of the College
s. "We sent out a memo that
go to Mondale events, don't
d."
ple who did it," he says,
ombination of rowdy types
ho just joined in. It's just a
eople who don't like Mon-
adds that "many students
ng to let Mondale go to cam-
ut some kind of protest."
OLLEGE Republicans'
t says, have tended more
silly, with a group of CRs
s "Fritzbusters" touring
uses and, outside Mondale's
George Washington Univer-
ek, having the "Student An-
n Coalition" dress in
ind handing out No-Doz and
ssersby.
what he says," replies
of Mondale's campaign.
's) not going to say 'ya, we
lit and we encourage it."'
al number of incidents has
The worst episode was at
al in mid-September, where
rotestors ,brandished signs
ovites for Mondale" and

OP-backed
yelled so persistantly that the can-
didate had to depart from his prepared
speech.
PRESS REPORTS immediately after
the disruption quoted an unidentified
student saying the heckling had been
orchestrated by the Reagan/Bush
campaign, down to telling demon-
strator where they should stand.
"A lot of things came out after the in-
cident, and they weren't what I said,"
says John Stuart, president of the TKE
house at USC. "So I'm not saying
anything at this time."
The polls indicated the disruption
evoked some voter sympathy for Mon-
dale, and Mondale quickly went on to
speak at George Washington last week.

All Star® Canvas Hi-Cut
All Stare Canvas Hi-Cut.
Whether you call them
"Chucks" or "Cons,"
they're famous the
4 . world over.
Std '
()OAn. ' "

WE GOT 'EMI
PURPLE, ORANGE,
BLACK, GREEN, RED

ACtion SportsWear
419E. LIBERTY
(2 Blocks off of S. State)

FACTORY
CLOSEOUTS
Swimwear,
Footwear;
Bodywea r

I

I
I

0

It's fourth and goal and you've got the ball. Make your move to the first team.
The National Security Agency offers you an all-pro career opportunity in the
following fields:

ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING There
are opportunities in a variety of
research and development projects
ranging from individual equipments to
very complex interactive systems
involving large numbers of micro-
processors, minicomputers and
computer graphics. Professional growth
is enhanced through interaction with
highly experienced NSA professionals
and through contacts in the industrial
and academic worlds. Facilities for
engineering analysis and design
automation are among the best
available.
COMPUTER SCIENCE At NSA you'll
discover one of the largest computer
installations in the world with almost
every major vendor of computer
equipment represented. NSA careers
provide mixtures of such disciplines as

systems analysis and design, scientific
applications programming, data base
management systems, operating systems,
computer networking/security, and
graphics.
MATHEMATICS You'll work on
diverse agency problems applying a
variety of mathematical disciplines.
Specific assignments might include
solving communications-related
problems, performing long-range
mathematical research or evaluating
new techniques for communications
security.
LINGUISTS NSA offers a wide range of
challenging assignments for Slavic,
Near Eastern and Asian language
majors involving translation, transcription
and analysis/reporting. Newly-hired
linguists can count on receiving
advanced training in their primary

language(s) and can plan on many
years of continued professional
growth.
THE REWARDS AT NSA NSA offers
a salary and benefit program that's
truly competitive with private industry.
There are assignments for those who
wish to travel and abundant good living
in the Baltimore-Washington area for
those who wish to stay close to home.
Countless cultural, historical,
recreational and educational opportu-
nities are just minutesaway from NSA's
convenient suburban location.
To find out more about NSA career
opportunities, schedule an interview
through your college placement office.
For additional information on the
National Security Agency, write to
National Security Agency, Attn: M322,
Fort George G. Meade, Maryland 20755.

Math/Science
(Majors/Minors/Aptitudes)

momppp, 1I

w m ' -

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan