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October 05, 1984 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-10-05

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4

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 5, 1984
S "esi

According to Marvin Parnes,
assistant director of resident hall living
and a member of the subcommittee

Siibwcube tf
Tke-
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DaIeg
764-0558

which drafted the survey, RAs are in-
structed not to force anyone to com-
plete the survey and are given a list of
counseling services where they can
refer students with problems.
"RAs are not therapists," said Par-
nes. "We let RAs know that if they feel
uncomfortable, they can get assistance
from another RA, RD (resident direc-
tor) or other staff member.
The survey is the result of several
years of discussion among University
officials in affirmative action, housing
and counseling offices.
RUTH ADDIS, Stockwell building
director and a member of the subcom-
mittee, said that the real beginning oc-
curred when the University president
issued a statement condemning sexual

harassment.
As time went on, however, concern
about harrassment spread from strictly
faculty-student relationships to
student-student relationships.
A poll at a large, urban university in
the south during the fall of 1981 showed
that 15 percent of men and 21 percent of
women reported they had been abused
by a "courtship" partner. 19 percent of
men and 38 percent of women reported
that they had been abused.
LAST SPRING, the Task Force on
Sexual Harrassment created a sub-
committee on student relations to write
a first draft of the questionnaire.
Since that draft, the survey has gone
through a lot of "toning down," after
orientation leaders, resident advisors
and counselors who saw early drafts of

the survey, according to Parnes.
"It was personally offensive, we rip-
ped it apart," said Pat DeKeyser, a
summer orientation leader who
reviewed the survey.
"We knew we wanted student input
for what would be an appropriate level
of questioning," Parnes said. "We
eliminated questions that were too in-
trusive . . . We want to provide forx
education."
In the central housing office,
associate housing director John Heidke
conceded that the two sensitive surveys
should probably not have been conduc-
ted at the same time.
"There are ways that we can better
coordinate the way we survey students.
. . It would be better to pace these
things."

____j

MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY NEEDS YOU!
Positions are now available on the following Regental and University Committees:
STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES
RESEARCH POLICIES - One grad student needed
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
Stop by the MSA office for a full listing of open committee positions.
Applications are available now.
DEADLINE for submitting applications is WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 10, 1984 - 5:00 P.M.
For more information contact Laurie Clement, 3039 Michigan Union, 763-3241

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INBRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Chinatown murder suspect held
SEATTLE - Tony Ng, the "third man" sought since February 1983 in the
Chinatown massacre in which 13 people were shot to death, has been
arrested by Canadian authorities in Calgary, Alberta, the .FBI reported
yesterday.
Seattle police confirmed Ng's arrest.
Ng, who disappeared from Seattle within hours of the shootings at the Wah
Mee Club in Chinatown, had been on the FBI's Ten Most wanted list since
June.
He was arrested yesterday at his apartment in Calgary's Chinatown,
Royal Candian Mounted Police Staff Sgt. Ted Ellis of Calgary said in a news
release.
Ng was arrested without incident by RCMP, Seattle police and FBI of-
ficers said FBI special agent Joseph Smith in Seattle. Ng was
being held on, a Canadian immigration violation.
Ng, 27, is the son of a Seattle-area Chinese restaurant owner. He is charged
with 13 counts of aggravated first-degree murder in the shooting deaths of 13
Chinese gunned down in the Wah Mee on Feb. 19,1983.
Congress fails to pass budget
WASHINGTON - Despite last-minute attempts by Congress to keep
federal funds flowing, the White House told hundreds of thousands of federal
workers to go home at midday yesterday after lawmakers failed to approve
a $500 billion catchall spending bill needed to keep most of the government
solvent.
While the government was partially shut down, President Reagan and
congressional leaders traded partisan charges of who was to blame for the
mess, which also left in doubt whether Congress could meet its target of ad-,
journing for the year by the end of the week.
The House voted yesterday morning to approvean emergency spending
extension to finance out-of-cash government agencies through today, and the
Senate followed suit early in the evening.
Edwin Dale, spokesman for the White House Office of Management and
the Budget, said the president was expected to'sign the temporary money
measure. All furloughed workers, he said, should report for work at their
regular time today.
Car explodes at Israeli embassy
NICOSIA, Cyprus - A bomb-laderr rental car exploded yesterday in the
unguarded lot of a building housing the Israeli Embassy in Cyprus, and a
pro-Syrian PLO guerrilla group later claimed responsibility for the blast.
Officials reported no casualties and said the explosion caused little"-
damage.
Police said one Arab was detained for questioning and another, identified
only as an Algerian who rented the Honda Civic in Nicosia on Saturday, was..
being sought. Police refused to give the Arabs' names.
A communique issued in Damascus, Syria, by Col Sased Moussa, head of
the Fatah faction opposed to PLO chairman Yasser Arafat, said, "One of our
units operating abroad blew up the Israeli Embassy in Nicosia."
Moussa vowed to continue striking "against Israeli targets whenever they.-
may be."
The Palestine Liberation Organization office in Nicosia had said earlier.
that the bombing was arranged by Israeli agents to harm relations between
authorities in Nicosia and the PLO.
Radioactive cargo found
OSTEND, Belgium - A diver yesterday stumbled upon the last container
of uranium hexafluoride trapped in the wreck of a French freighter, ending a
six-week search for the radioactive cargo.
Divers had been plumbing the depths for the 15-ton cylinder since Satur-
day, when all but the last of 30 such barrels had been retrieved from the
freighter Mont Louis. The vessel sank Aug. 25 after colliding with a North
Sea passenger ferry.
The final container was retrieved yesterday after it was found by a DutAh
diver. He had first unsuccessfully searched the forward section of the ship's
hull, the spot where the yellow cylinder was believed to be, loose from its
chains and hidden by a mass of other cargo.
When he could not find it, the unidentified diver swam six to nine feet up
inside the hull, where he bumped into an unexpected object. It proved to be
the container he sought - undamaged and neatly attached to its chain exac-
tly where it had been placed when the ship was loaded.
The discovery was described by Paul Goris, a senior official of the com-
pany that handled the retrieval operation.
"I was not myself on the spot at the time," Goris said. "But I can imagine
the excitement. We are all relieved. We were getting nervous."
Lebanese terrorists tentatively
identified by U.S. intelligence
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence believes it has identified the terrorists
behind the fatal Sept. 20 bombing of the American embassy annex in east
Beirut, but lacks precise information about their~location and suspected ties
to Iran, administration and congressional officials said yesterday.
A senior Reagan administration official, who insisted on anonymity, also
said the possibility of military retaliation against those responsible for the
attack has been discussed at the White House, but has met resistance from a

number of quarters, including the Pentagon's Joint Chiefs of Staff.
The official said U.S. intelligence is close to a firm identification of those
behind the suicide bombing attack, although it still is "not 100 percent sure."
The group is described as one of a number that use the name Jihad Islami, or
Islamic Holy War.

A

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{
Vol. XCV - No. 26
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967X) is published Tuesday through Sunday
during the Fall and Winter terms apd Tuesday through Saturday during the
Spring and Summer terms by students at the University of Michigan. Sub-
scription rates: September through April - $16.50 in Ann Arbor; $29.00
outside the city; May through August - $4.50 in Ann Arbor, $6.00 outside the
city. Second-class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. Postmaster: Send
address changes to The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndi-
cate and'College Press Service, and United Students Press Service.

1867 ALFRED NOBEL LIGHTS
AND NEVER GETS A NO THER

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his disco very
And you W geta
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of discovenng
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THE FIRST STICK OF D YNAMITE
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Editor in chief ........................ BILL SPINDLE
Managing Editors ................. CHERYL BAACKE
NEIL CHASE
Associate News Editors ............ LAURIE DELATER
GEORGEA KOVANIS
THOMAS MILLER
Personnel Editor ...... ........SUE BARTO
Opinion Page Editors .......... ...... JAMES BOYD
JACKIE YOUNG
NEWS STAFF: Morcy Fleischer, Maria Gold. Thomas
Hroch, Rachel Gottlieb, Sean Jackson, Carrie Levine,
Eric Mattson, Tracey Miller, Kery Murakami, Allison
Zousmer.
Magazine Editor ...................JOSEPH KRAUS
Associate Magazine Editor .......... BEN YOMTOOB
Arts Editors .................... FANNIE WEINSTEIN
PETE WILLIAMS
Ass-;..., Arts E itor ..:. .......BRON B LLI

Sports Editor ...... ...............MIKE MCGRAW
Associate Sports Editors ............. JEFF BERGIDA
KATIE BLACKWELL
PAUL HELGREN
DOUGLAS B. LEVY
STEVE WISE
SPORTS STAFF: Dave Aretho, Mark Borowski. Joe
Ewing. Chris Gerbasi. Jim Gindin. Skip Goodman.
Steve Herz, Rick Kaplan. Tom Keoney, Tim Mokinen
Adorn Martin, Scott McKinlay, Barb McQuade, Brad
Morgan. Jerry Muth, Phil Nussel. Mike Redstote,
Scott Salowich, Randy Schwartz, Susan Warner.
Business Manager .................STEVEN BLOOM
Advertising Manager .......... MICHAEL MANASTER
Display Manager ..................... LIZ CARSON'
Nationals Manager. ......................JOE ORTIZ
Sales Mannae ........... DBIE DIOGU4ADI

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