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September 29, 1984 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-09-29

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Saturday, September 29, 1984
Af han attack
takes 32lie
i Pakis to
tRt".L 11VoS

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports

I

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) -
Pakistan claimed yesterday that
Afghan warplanes attacked a Pakistani
border town used by Afghan rebels,
killing 32 people and injuring 48.
An official Pakistani statement said a.
single Afghan warplane bombed the
bazaar town of Teri Mangal, a major
crossing point for Afghanistan's anti-
communist rebels, at dusk Thursday.
AN OFFICIAL reached late yester-
day at Parachinar said the plane drop-
ped two bombs and stayed in the area
for "four or five minutes." It made one
more pass over the area before flying
back into Afghan territory, said Wakil
Shah, the Pakistani government's ad-
ministrative representative for the
tribal area.
He said, however, that it was too dark
to make out the type of plane or see its
markings.
He estimated that 200 shops were
destroyed or badly damaged in the at-
tack, and the Pakistani government
said a number of homes and a health
center were also wrecked.
PAKISTANI authorities originally
put the death toll at 30, changed it to 80
and then revised it again to 32. A
government spokesman said there was
confusion because of "bad com-
munications" and the fact that many of
the injured, mostly Afghans, were in
"very serious" condition.

It was the 11th raid since Aug. 13 on
Teri Mangal, tucked just inside the
border in the Kurram tribal lands of the
North-West Frontier Province. The
previous violations claimed 54 lives,
according to official Pakistani figures.
The attacks are widely believed to be
part of the Afghan armed forces' at-
tempts to pressure Pakistan to keep.
rebels from using the town as a base
during the months-old siege of the Ali
Khel Afghan military outpost 15 miles
away in eastern Afghanistan's Paktia
province.
According to unofficial reports,
Thursday's violation was the fourth in
two days. The reports said that on
Wednesday Afghan planes twice en-
tered Pakistani air space just south of
the frontier town of Chitral, about 170
miles northwest of Islamabad,
Pakistan's capital.
The Pakistani Foreign Office in
Islamabad said it was issuing a strong
protest warning the Kabul government
headed by Babrak Karmal that
Pakistan will not tolerate "unprovoked
and wanton aggression against in-
nocent inhabitants."
The protest note, to the Afghan Em-
bassy's charge d'affairs, also warned
that the latest incident "cannot but in-
vite consequences for which the entire
responsibility will rest with them."

Anti-NATO protesters arrested
WILDFLECKEN, West Germany - Anti-NATO protesters broke into a
U.S. Army training area yesterday in a protest against military maneuvers,
and West German police arrested 188 of them. The state interior minister
accused the Army of failing to guard its installations adequately.
The U.S. Army said yesterday that vandals also had broken into an Army
air defense post in Finkenberg, near the East German border, and sprayed
paint on three Hawk missiles but that the weapons were not damaged.
Hesse state police spokesman Ernst Jung said authorities expected 20,000
to 30,000 people in Fulda today for a demonstration that would capl more than
a week of protest.
On Thursday, Lt. Gen. Robert Wetzel, commander of the 5th Corp, urged
West Germany to crack down on "anarchists and criminals" who have
damaged military vehicles, cut fences, sprayed paint, and thrown rocks at
soldiers. He said the culprits must be "prosecuted fully under German law."
Wetzel's statement drew an angry response Friday from Hesse State In-
terior Minister Horst Winterstein. He accused the U.S. Army of "insufficient
security measures at its own installations" in West Germany
Economic indicators rise .5%

{

Winerprvie ~ socAsited Press
Winter preview^''---
John Moss knocks heavy, wet snow out of a tree yesterday in front of his shop
in downtown Denver. Denver was blanketed in eight inches of snow yester-
day as much of the nation experienced record cold temperatures.

Qhurcb W rnbt beruitEE Residents evacuate

CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the
Christian Reformed Church
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
668-7421
10:00 a.m. Morning Worship Sermon:
"Pay Attention - to Yourself."
11:15 a.m. Refreshments and Con-
versation.
6:00 p.m. Evening Worship and Ser-
mon: '"Fulfillment."
Guest Speaker: Rev. Leonard Hof-
fman, Stated Clerk of the Christian
Reformed Church.
:M T0 ''Viewpointg in the Christian
Reformed Church - Trends in the
Christian Reformed Church.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL and STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
663-5560
Services at 9:15 and 10:30.
Wednesday Bible Study, 7:30.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
FOUNDATION
502 East Huron, 663-9376
(Between State and Division)
Sunday Worship 9:55 a.m.
October 30: "Strength and
Weakness."
Campus Classes: 11:25 a.m.
Midweek Study and Dinner for
Students: Thurs., 5:15 p.m.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., 662-4466
(Between S. University and Hill)
Sunday Worship Services: 9:30 and
11:00.
Wednesday Night Fellowship, 8:15.
Communion at 9:30.
* * *
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
662-4536
Church School and Sunday Service
9:30 and 11:00.
September 30: "Performance, Not
Promises."
Ministers: Rev. Wayne T. Large
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Rev. Tom Wachterhauser
Education Director:
Rose McLean
Broadcast Sundays 9:30 a.m. - WRNS, 1290 AM
TelevisedMondays 8: 00p.m. - Cable Channel 9.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
at Lord of Light
(LCA-ALC-AELC)
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
668-7622
Pastor: Galen Hora
Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday evening supper, 6:00p.m.
Wednesday evening Worship, 9:30 p.m.
Choir: Wednesday, 8:00 p.m.

flaming house

The Ann Arbor Fire Department
fought another early morning blaze
yesterday at a home located at 632
Church St.
The fire began at 3 a.m. in the back
kitchen on the ground floor in one of the
five apartments of the house.
ACCORDING to fire officials who
were on the scene minutes after it
began, an incandescent light in the kit-
chen was the source of the blaze, ap-
parently from some faulty wiring.
Dave Ciampa, a second year

graduate student who lives in the apar-
tment, said he "noticed that the power
went out a little before 3 o'clock, and
then I started to smell smoke."
Apartments directly above the fire on
the second and third floors had to be
evacuated, along with residents on the
other side of the house.
The fire was extinguished in about
30 minutes, with damage extending to
the ceiling of the kitchen into the floor
of the apartment above.
- Tracey Miller

WASHINGTON - The government's main economic forecasting gauge
posted a modest 0.5 percent rise in August after two consecutive declines,
prompting the Reagan administration and private economists to say yester-
day that the economy is not in danger of toppling into a recession.
Release of the index of leading economic indicators had been awaited with
some apprehension after decreases in June and July. A decline of three mon-
ths in a row is often taken as a signal that a recession is approaching.
Some analysts said the August advance was fairly anemic, but all agreed
that the economy is apparently shaking off its summer doldrums and headed
for further growth.
But in another area, the news was less promising. The Commerce Depar-
tment reported that the nation suffered a $9.9 billion foreign trade deficit in
August. While this showing was an improvement from the record $14.1
billion set in July, it left the imbalance for the year at $83.7 billion.
Analysts predicted the deficit for all of 1984 would hit $130 billion - almost
double last year's record $69.4 billion deficit.
The slight trade improvement in August stemmed from a 10.4-percent
decline in petroleum shipments as both the volume and the price edged
downward.
Diet, drug relieve migraines
LONDON - Allergy to food - mainly milk, wheat and eggs - is a major
cause of migraine, and the debilitating headaches can be prevented in most
cases with diet and a drug, a British expert said yesterday.
"I have no doubt at all that most migraine sufferers wil benefit by pur-
suing this treatment" of a controlled diet and a food allergy drug, said Dr
Jean Monro, consultant allergist at London's Nightingale Hospital.
The doctor and two colleagues established a link between food allergy and
migraine among a group of patients at the National Hospital for Nervous
Disease in London. Their findings were published yesterday by The Lancet
an authoritative British medical journal.
Some previous studies have shown food allergy is one of the contributing
causes of migraine, intense headaches usually confined to one side of the
head and often accompanied by nausea and visual problems. Other trigger
of migraine include chemicals, stress, flickering lights, strong perfume
tobacco fumes and staring at zig-zag lines. The underlying cause of migraire
is not known. , .
Monro said her research confirmed earlier findings and identified "for the
first time a particular drug that is specifically effective in protecting against
food-allergy migraine."
Senate fight stalls money bill.
WASHINGTON - Ignoring mounting pressure for action on an emergency
money bill to keep the government operating, the Senate was mired yester-
day in _fights over civil rights legislation and other unrelated items.
A filibuster by Senate conservatives prevented a move yesterday to attach
the civil rights proposal to an emergency money bill that Congress must
pass to keep numerous government agencies from shutting down when the
1985 fiscal year begins Monday.
The controversy threatened to disrupt some government operations early
next week and delay Congress' scheduled adjournment for the year.
Nonetheless, there was no sign that senators on either side of the civil rights
fight would relent and Majority Leader Howard Baker (R-Tenn.) announced
that the Senate would meet today in hopes of breaking the logjam.
Baker said that the dispute, along with the intention of some Senators to
add other items to the stop gap bill, threatens to delay Congress' scheduled
adjournment for the year.
"I no longer target Oct. 5 as the adjournment date," Baker said. Thursday
night, the Senate voted 51-48, passing the so-called Civil Rights Act of 1984,
already passed by the House which could be considered as an amendment to
the money bill.
U.S. embassy in Peru attacked
LIMA, Peru - Three terrorists believed to be members of the Shining
Path guerrilla group yesterday sprayed automatic weapons fire into the U.S.
Embassy, damaging offices on all four floors but causing no casualties.
Firing from a Park across the street shortly after midnight. Three
Peruvian Civil Guard police stationed at the embassy threw themselves to
the ground and returned fire, police said.
Police said they arrested a suspect in connection with the incident but he
was not one of the three gunmen.
The U.S. press officer said the U.S. Marines guarding the embassy
remained inside without firing their weapons as gunmen "just sprayed their
fire" up and down the building, shattering windows on all four floors.
Vol. XCV - No. 21
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967X) is published Tuesday through Sunday
during the Fall and Winter terms and Tuesday through Saturday during the
Spring and Summer terms by students at the University of Michigan. Sub-
scription rates: September through April - $16.50 in Ann Arbor; $29.00
outside the city; May through August - $4.50 in Ann Arbor, $6.00 outside the
city. Second-class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. Postmaster: Send
address changes to The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndi-
cate andCollege Press Service, and United Students Press Service.

I

Ousted justice runs

for former
LANSING (UPI) - Dorothy Com-
stock Riley is not just a candidate in
this year's Michigan Supreme Court
race. She - or more precisely the
"Riley case" - probably is the biggest
single issue as well.
Those involved say controversy over
Riley's ouster from the high court in
February 1983 has drawn more atten-
tion to this race than judicial contests
normally get.
There is a virtual consensus that the
Riley case and the publicity it
generated have damaged the image of
Michigan's highest court.
But the candidates have sharp
disagreement over whether public
suspicion about partisanship in the high
court is justified.
Three high court seats are up for
grabs this year. The Democrats curren-
tly have four court seats, Republicans
two, and one justice was elected as an
independent.
Justice Thomas Kavanagh was

bench seat
nominated by the Democratic Party for
another eight-year term and is opposed
by Riley.
Justice James Brickley was
nominated by the Republicans to com-
plete the four years that remain on the
term of former Justice Mary Coleman
who he was appointed to replace.
Brickley is opposed by Wayne County
Circuit Judge James Hathaway,
nominated by the Democrats.
Justice Patricia Boyle was
nominated by the Democrats to com-
plete the six years remaining on the
term of the late Justice Blair Moody.
Her opponent is former U.S. Sen.
Robert Griffin.
Riley, who served on the Michigan
Court of Appeals and Wayne County
Circuit Court, ran unsuccessfully for
the high court in 1982.
Former Gov. William Milliken ap-
pointed her to the court following the
death of Moody, a successful
Democratic candidate for re-election.

PM

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(Requre by 39 U.S.C. $66)
1. TITLE OF PUBLICATION A. PUBLICATION NO. 2. DATE OF FILING
The Michigan Daily 0 7 4 5 6 7 Sept. 27, 198
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ANNUALLY PRICE
Tuesday through Sunday, school year 235 29.00

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PUALIHER (Name and Complate Malng Addne a)
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Reagan, Gromyko
meet for policy talks

4

(Continued from Page 1)
"It was not angry," he said. "It was
calm, deliberate and business-like
throughout."
IN ADDITION to nuclear weapons,
Shultz said the leaders talked about
such regional issues as the war between
Iran and Iraq, as well as Lebanon and
the problems of the Palestinians.
Reagan, who has been criticized
repeatedly by Mondale for not having
met with top Soviets earlier in his
presidency, began the meeting by
telling reporters, "I think that anyone
must react with hope" to the fact that
the meeting was occurring.
Nearly four hours later, Shultz escor-
ted the foreign minister to the White
House diplomatic entrance to bid

ALL OF THE attention to public
relations -quite a bit more access than
usual for the press - appeared to annoy
the foreign minister, who had arrived
at the White House with a big grin.
During their talks, Reagan and
Gromyko were accompanied by their
top aides - among them Shultz, Vice
President George Bush and Soviet Am-
bassador Anatoly Dobrynin.
U.S. officials had said in advance
they would concentrate on urging the
Soviets to resume nuclear arms reduc-
tion talks, as well as simply clearing the
air after the. long period of hostility
between the superpowers. They had
cautioned that they did not expect any
breakthroughs.
Gromyko, foreign minister for 27
years, has met with nearly every

Editor in chief ........................ BILL SPINDLE
Managing EditorsC.................CHERYL8AACKE
NEIL CHASE
Associate News Editors ............ LAURIE DELATER
GEORGEA KOVANIS
THOMAS MILLER
Personnel Editor.......................SUE BARTO
Opinion Page Editors.................JAMES BOYD
JACKIE YOUNG
NEWS STAFF: Marcy Fleischer, Mario Gold, Thomas
Hroch, Rachel Gottlieb, Sean Jackson, Carrie Levine,
Eric Mattson, Tracey Miller. Kery Murokomi, Allison
Zousmer.
Magazine Editor....................JOSEPH KRAUS
Associate Magazine Editor .......... BEN YOMTOOB
Arts Editors .................... FANNIE WEINSTEIN
PETE WILLIAMS
Associate Arts Editors ..................BYRON BULL
ANDY WEINE
JEFF FROOMAN

Sports Editor ...... MIKE MCGRAV.
Associate Sports Editors..............JEFF BERGID.i
KATIE BLACKWELI!
PAUL HELGREtj
DOUGLAS B. LEV'
STEVE WISC
SPORTS STAFF: Dove Aretha, Mark Borowski, Joe.
Ewing. Chris Gerbasi, Jim Gindin, Skip Goodman..
Steve-Herz. Rick Kaplan. Tom Keneyk Tim Mokinen,,
Adam Martin. ScotthMcKinlay. Barb McQuade, Brad.
Morgan. Jerry Muth. Phil Nussel. Mike Redstone.'
Scott Solowich, Randy Schwartz, Susan Warner.
Business Manager.................STEVEN BLOOM
Advertising Manager..........MICHAEL MANASTER:
Display Manager......................LIZ CARSON'
Nationals Manager ..................... JOE ORTIZ.
Sales Manager.................DEBBIE DIOGUARDI.
Finance Manager...................LINDA KAFTAN
Marketing Manager.................. KELLY SODEN,

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