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September 12, 1984 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-09-12

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ARTS

The Michigan Daily

Wednesday, September 12, 1984

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'age 6

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Local bands take anniversary

cruise

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By Pete Williams
O NCE again, it's time to go cruisin'
with Ann Arbor's local music
scene.
For those of you who were not yet of
Ann Arbor consciousness two years
ago, this music cruise is a return trip.
It's Cruisin' Ann Arbor II, the sequel
album to the Ann Arbor Music Project's
1982 release.
Although the production has been
tightened up on Cruisin' II (It's being
mixed in a studio this time instead of
someone's living room), the idea
behind the sequel is the same as that of
Cruisin'.
That idea is to showcase local bands
and elicit interest in the Ann Arbor
music scene. "We're trying to get
national attention focused inward,"
said Tom Witaker, drummer with Map
of the World, one of the bands included
in the new album. "We want to make it
so bands don't have to go to another city
to get attention-so they can make it
here."
Witaker is part of the Ann Arbor
Music Project, a local group of
promoters, musicians, and the like that
is producing Cruisin' II. AAMP was the
producer of the original Cruisin' two

years ago, and the group felt that this
year would be a good one to resurrect
the idea. "It's something we'd like to do
every couple of years," Whitaker said.
"It was also a. self-conscious thing,"
Whitaker added. "We didn't feel we had
enough jazz on the first album and
some of the younger bands have a real
following."
As far as the production, mixing will
be done at Al Nalli Studios, which is in
the process now of being equipped for
Cruisin II. Instead of the 8-track recor-
dings AAMP made for the original
Cruisin', they will use 16 track
machines-a change the producers
believe will greatly increase the quality
of the master recordings.
"I think the bands we have are
professional enough to put in a good
recording session," said P.J. Ryder,
who is also involved in AAMP. "I'm
confident they can do it."
This time around, jazz is taken care
of. Tonight's recording session, which
will be done live at U-Club, will feature
an all jazz program with Lunar Glee
Club, Ron Brooks Trio (with special
guest, The Bill Lucas Quartet), and
Kathy Moore and Stephanie Ozer.
Like the jazz session, all recording

sessions for the album will be held at
9:30, tonight through Saturday night at
the U-Club.
Thursday night's theme strays away 4
from jazz and toward more traditional
rock and roll with The Buzztones, Steve
Nardella's Rock and Roll Trio, and the
ever-popular Watusies.

On Friday, it's time for pop rock.
Aluminum Beach, Map of the World,
and The Slang-to be exact. And, the
last night will be-for lack of a better
term-alternative music night. Satur-
day night's bands are The State, Sud-
den Death, and The Evaders.
Ryder said he is pleased with the
diverse music offered by the bands.
"We have one jazz night, which is
something we didn't have on the last
album," he said. "And we also get the
other side, with a little more heavy
metal-type music."

4

AAMP is starting by putting 2000
albums in the record stores and Ryder
looks for a receptive market in the Ann
Arbor area.
"I think that more than 2000 people
will want to snap up an album," he said.
"A lot of people will just want to get one
on their way out of Ann Arbor to try and
remember the bands they saw."

The Buzztones will be one of the local bands featured on Cruisin' Ann Arbor II. The band will hold a live recording
session at 9:30 on Thursday in the U-Club.

I I

BE A VOLUNTEER AT UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN HOSPITALS
WE HAVE SOMETHING TO OFFER YOU !
YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO OFFER OTHERS!
COME EXPLbRE: Attend an informational session to learn
about exciting volunteer opportunities in:
ADULT/CHILD PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALS
AMBULATORY CARE SERVICES
MAIN/KELLOGG
MOTOR MEALS OF ANN ARBOR
MOTT CHILDREN'S/WOMEN'S/HOLDEN PERINATAL HOSPITALS

rOF IUUU htEEf

4

WHEN:
WHERE:

September 10, 1984 -7:00 PM
September 13, 1984 - 7:00 pm
September 18, 1984-- 4:00 pm
Main Hospital, 6th Floor Amphitheatre
(Sept. 10 & 13)
Main Hospital, Rm S9410 (Sept. 18)
For more information, call 764-6874

EVERYONE likes to party, right?
end everyone likes a good par-
ty, right? Now we all know there are
good parties and there are good par-
ties. If you hosted a good party,
wouldn't you want everyone to
know? Well, now's your chance.
The Daily Arts page is proud to an-
nounce the birth of what hopefully
will become a weekly feature-Par-
ty of the Week. All you have to do is

submit a photograph (preferably
black and white) of your Friday or
Saturday night party and a com-
postion of 150 words or less
describing why you think your party
was the Party of the Week. All en-
tries must be dropped off in the
Daily Arts Office by 3 p.m. Wed-
nesday. The winning party will be
published in Friday's Daily

s

6

Run for your life
Lujuana Warren and Nancy Matejak star in "The Runner Stumbles," the
first production of the Detroit Center for the Performing Arts 1984-85 season.
The drama, written by Michigan playright Milan Stitt, opens September 28
and will be performed for three consecutive weekends. For ticket infor-
mation call 925-7138.

4

SUCCESS
At ROLM, we believe there is no single way
to be successful. Rather, we believe success stems from
the creativity and ambition of the individual.
That's why we're committed to creating an environment
in which motivated people can succeed. The risk
in this approach is high, but the rewards are greater.
ROLM. We create an atmosphere for success.
The rest is up to you.

expands to Ann Arbor...
v c

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJORS:
We'll be on Campus October 16 & 17

At that time, we'll ask you to share the re-
sponsibility for discovering where you best fit
in ROLM. Consider working on one of our
project teams in software areas such as voice
and data communications, distributed data
base management, integrated voice-text ap-
plications, data, voice and network architec-
ture, or Ada'.
Explore a team hardware design position in
areas such as digital telephones, voice and
data communications, local area networks
and packet switching, or analog, digital and
VLSI design.
Or, you can talk with us about combining

digital-controlled business communications
systems, and the most advanced ruggedized
computer systems in the world.
Sign up with your Placement Office for an on-
campus interview, or forward your resume
and letter of interest to Vicky Anderson, Engi-
neering Recruitment, M/S 350, 4900 Old
Ironsides Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054.
Watch for posters announcing our campus
presentations.
We are proud to be an equal opportunity/
affirmative action employer.

BACK TO SCHOOL SALF!
savings up to 50% off list

complete selection of:
art & drafting supplies &.equipment
picture frames & custom framing

rAz.w;1Ann Arbor

J

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