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September 12, 1984 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, September 12, 194 - Page 5
Health Service to offer
free measle vaccinations

By ALLISON ZOUSMER
A casual stroll through the Diag this
Friday could give students more than
just a breath of fresh air, thanks to
University Health Service officials,
who will be administering free measles
shots to University students.
The immunizations, which are being
offered as part of Festifall '84, are
reminiscent of last winter's campus-
wide measle innoculation program
which started after two Markley
residents contracted the highly con-
tagious disease.
BUT THE upcoming innoculations are
merely "a perfect example of preven-
tive medicine," said Health Service
Director, Caesar Briefer. Although
many University students were im-
munized during childhood, they could
still be susceptible to measles because
shots given prior to 1968 are not as
effective as more recent vaccines, Briefer
said.
A health survey completed by 60 per-
cent of this year's entering freshper-
sons illustrates Briefer's concern. 31
percent of the students had received the
vaccine prior to 1968. Another 13-14 per-
cent were never immunized or were un-
sure whether they had been vaccinated.
Briefer estimated that "as much as 20
percent of the campus is susceptible to
measles."
After serious measles outbreaks at
Purdue and Indiana University in 1983,
Health Services was ready to begin

immunizing students when the two
cases were discovered at Markley,
Briefer said. In all, over 1,600 students
were vaccinated, while another 1,300
were screened by the program.
Though the campus outbreak was
confined to the two cases, an out-of-

state participant in a wrestling meet
last winter at Ann Arbor Huron High
School spread the disease to contestants
in the area which contributed to the
State of Michigan having the second
highest number of measles cases repor-
ted this year.

Planes, kisses on

display in
(Continued from page 1)
taking place will include a kissing booth
run by the Rugby Club and a booth staf-
fed with members of the Delta Chi
fraternity.
The Flying Club is planning to have
an airplane in the Diag. But don't ex-
pect the club's members to fly the plane
in. The plane is going to be taxied from
the Ann Arbor Airport down State St. to
the center of campus at four in the
morning Thursday with a police escort.
FOR THOSE who prefer to do their
flying without the aid of engines, the
Soaring Club will have a glider on
display next to the Natural Resources
Building.
The organizers of Festifall are
looking for a large turnout.
"I hope many students get there,"
Ball said. "It's a great way to find out
about the clubs on campus. I would like
students to know that there are other

Festifall
things to do besides homework."
'Homner Thiel, an LSA junior and
Chairman of the Student's Organization
Board, .thinks Festifall will attract
students who have felt overwhelmed
with the myriad of pamphlets
describing clubs that are pushed on
students.
"It's more personal, and is better
than reading about (the club) in a
booklet," Thiel said.
THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS
CALL 764-0557

Associated Press
New pair of boots
Joe Billot, center, is shown loading the 600 pound alligator he caught in Louisiana Sunday into his truck. Sunday was the
second day of alligator season, which continues until October 7.

Reagan to
ask for
release of
Vietnamese
prisoners
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Reagan
administration will ask Vietnam to
release over the next two years,
thousands of current and former Viet-
namese political prisoners for reset-
tlement in the United States, Secretary
of State George Shultz said yesterday.
The program, as outlined by Shultz
before a Senate Judiciary subcommit-
tee hearing, would affect some 10,000
Vietnamese, many of whom had close
ties to the United States during the
Vietnam war. The total includes family
members.
When the U.S.-backed regime in
Saigon was ousted by North Viet-
namese forces nine years ago, many of
these Vietnamese were went to "re-
education camps." An undetermined
number remain in confinement.
SHULTZ ALSO disclosed that the
United States over the next three years
will accept for admission all Viet-
namese children fathered by American
servicemen during the Vietnam war.
"Because of their undisputed ties to
our country, these chldren and family
members are of particular
humanitarian concern to the United
States," Shultz said. According to ad-
ministration figures, some 1,500
Amerasians already have been reset-
tled in the United States and another
8,000 or so remain in Vietnam.
Vietnam has blamed Washington for
the continued, plight of its political
prisoners, claiming the Reagan ad-
ministration has rejected Hanoi's of-
fers that they be resettled in the United
States.
Shultz said the United States has
made a two-year effort to secure the
release of the prisoners, but only a han-
Idful have been resettled.
The administration has said Vietnam
has not been responsive to U.S.
proposals that representatives of the
International Committee for the Red
Cross be allowed to visit the camps and
that Vietnam provide a list of those
eligible for resettlement.
IRS Handbook for Special Agents
The IRS Special Agent Handbook is
intended as a training aid for new
special agents and a reference book
for the more experienced agents.
The following is a brief overview of
the handbook:

WHAT EVERY STUDENT
SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE DIFFERENCES
BETWEEN LEASING A TELEPHONE AND
LEASING A CHICKEN.

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Yes, there are differences.
And we think you should
know what they are.
Ask yourself these
questilons.
WHEN YOU LEASE A
CHICKEN DO YOU
GET THREE MONTHS
FREE DURING
THE SUMMER?
Probably not. But when
you lease your telephone
from AT&T this fall, you won't

N

-RDIRECT-Y
< Ship a chicken? Don't be
silly. However, your AT&T
leased telephone will be
shipped directly to you after
one call to 1-800-555-8111,
or you can pick up your
phone at any of our AT&T
Phone Centers.
ONE FINAL TItQ: DOES
ST C Tl MOTO LEASE
A JCKEMAS TO LEASE A
TELEPOE THIS FALL?
Hardly. While we have no hard data
on the exact cost of leasing a chicken,
we can tell you with some certainty that
the cost of leasing a telephone this fall
is far less than you might think.
The decision to lease a chicken or a

N

pay any lease charges next summer.
You can use your phone at home, and
bring it back to school in the fall.
DO LEASED CHICKENS COME IN A
SELECTION OF COLORS AND STYLES? -
No. Chickens don't come in many colors.
But the AT&T telephone you lease
this fall comes in avariety of
colors and three popular styles.
ARE LEASED CHICKENS-
REPAIRED FREE?
Don't kid yourself. Repairing a chicken is a delicate
process that requires the work of expensive professionals.
However, in the off chance your AT&T leased telephone

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1

telephone, of course, rests with you.
But should you opt for the tele-
phone, remember: you get three
months free next summer, and you can take
the phone home with you. There's a choice
of colors and styles, free repair, and
we'll ship you the phone or you can pick
it up at any of our AT&T Phone Centers.
It doesn't cost much either. And

*
*
*
*
*

General Investigative Procedure
Methods of proving income
Sample report: bank deposit case
Sources of information
Surveillance, Searches, Seizures
Federal Court and related matters

I To discourage public knowledge of

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