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April 06, 1984 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-04-06

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 6, 1984 - Page 3

HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
Don't miss the chance to see The Big Chill for a second time tonight in
MLB 3 at 6, 8, & 10 p.m. The movie, written by University alumnus Larry
Kasdan, focuses on the reunion of eigh friends from the University.
Films
Ann Arbor Film Co-op - The Seventh Samurai, 7:30 p.m., Nat. Sci.
Cinema Guild - Amarcord, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Lorch.
Cinema Two - Chelsea Girls, 7 p.m., Aud. A. Angell Hall.
Alternative Action - Hammett, 7 & 9 p.m., MLB 4.
Performances
Student Advocacy Center - "Stepping into Tomorrow," 8 p.m.,
Michigan Theatre.
School of Music - Music of Johann Sebastian Bach, 8 p.m., Art Museum.
Clarinet recital, Margaret Donaghue, 8 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre - "Veronica's Room," 8 p.m., 338 S. Main St.
Dance Department - "Dances for Small Crowds," 7:30 p.m., Studio A,
'Dance Bldg., 1310 N. University Ct.
Readers' Theatre Guild - "Just So Stories,"' theatre production of
Rudyard Kipling stories, 8p.m., Pendleton Rm., Union.
Performance Network - Dance Theatre II, 8 p.m., 408 W. Washington.
Ark - Utah Phillips, 8 p.m., 1421 Hill.
The Street Light Theater - A new theater group, free admission, 8 p.m.,
Rm.126E.Quad.
Speakers
History - "Making Their Own History?", 2 - 7 p.m., 3rd Floor Library,
League.
South and Southeast Asian Studies - " 'Krishna Smiled' & Other South
Asian Phenomena," Judith Elkin, noon, Lane Hall Commpns.
Graduate Studies in Trapsportation-"Equity Issues in the Use of Transit
Services of New York City," William Milczarski, 3-5 p.m., Rm. 4050 LSA
Bldg.
School of Natural Resources - "A Forester's Perspective on Forest and
Land Management," Mary Cockerline, 3-5 p.m., Rm. 1040 Dana Bldg.
Neuroscience - "Post-Translational Modification of Melanocortin & Pro-
"Opiocortin in Reptiles," Bob Dores, 4 p.m., 1057 MHRI.
Latin American Solidarity Committee-Fernando Rodriguez speaks on
elections in El Salvador, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 126, Residential College.
English - "Development of Farce in Oliver Twist, Hard Times, & Great
Expectation," Jan Jernigan, 8 p.m., 1420 Hill St.
- Russian & East European Studies -"Women Revolutionaries, in Russia,
the Personal & the Political," 4 p.m., Henderson Rm., League.
Natural Resources - Honors Convocation, "U.S.-Canadian Relations &
the Environment," Charles Caccia, 2 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
.Philosophy - "Aristotle & the Stoics on the Goodls of Fortune," John
Cooper, 2:30 p.m., "The Misfortunes of Virtue," J. B. Schneewind, 4:30 p.m.,
Rm. 4051 LSA.
Astronomy -"How Empty is Empty Space?" Richard Teske, 8:30 p.m.,
;Aud. B Angell Hall.
Extension Service - Fifth Annual Growth Capital Symposium, 8 a.m.
r.egistration, Chrysler Center.
Center for South & Southeast Asian Studies and Department of History -
"The Earliest European Novel about India: Hartly House, Calcutta (1789),"
8 p.m., Rackham W. Conf. Rm.
Anthropology - "The Rise of Spiritual Healing in Botswana," Evelyn
Barbee, 4 p.m., 2021 LSA Bldg.
Philosophy - "Aristotle and the Stoics on the Goods of Fortune," Nicholas
White, 2:30 p.m. "The Misfortunes of Virtue," William Frankena, 4:30 p.m.,
4051 LSA Bldg.
School of Education and Department of English - "Building Bridges: The
High School-University Connection"8 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Guild House - "The Interconnectedness of Militarism and Minority Con-
cerns," Progressive Student Network member Naomi Braine, noon, 802
Monroe.
Meetings
Korean Christian Fellowship - Bible Study, 9 p.m., Campus Chapel.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class - 7:30 p.m., University Reformed Church.
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship - (time not yet determined), 3rd
Floor Trotter House.
Miscellaneous
LAGROC & QuAC-Celebration of Sexual Orientation Anti-Discrimination
policy, 6:30 p.m., Pond Rm., Union.
Tae Kwon Do Club - Practice, 5 p.m., CCRB Martial Arts Rm.
Duplicate Bridge Club - Open game, 7:15 p.m., League.
Men's Rennis - Michigan v. Northwestern, 2:30 p.m., Track & Tennis
Bldg.
Continuing Medical Education - "Head & Neck Oncology," & "Basic
Cardiac Support," Towsley Center.
HRD - Course, "Word Processors, Hands On," 8:30- 11:30 a.m., Rm 1050,
Ad. Services.
Muslim Student Association - discussion of events in Muslim world, 9

p.m., 407 N. Ingalls.
Museum of Art - "Art Break," Pru Rosenthal, 12:10 p.m., Art Museum.
Folk Dance Club - Serbian dancing, 8:30 - 10 p.m., Third Floor Dance
Studio, Corner of William & State Streets.
Scene Magazine - Ann Arbor Computer, Business & Investment Show, 3-9
p.m., Track & Tennis Bldg.
Washtenaw Community College - Employer, recruitment career infor-
mation day, 10 - 11:45 a.m. & 1 - 3 p.m., Culinary Arts Dining Rm., Student
Center Building, 4800 E. Huron River Dr.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, M1 48109
Malicious Intent

Reagan denies unfair sex bias

From AP and UPI
NEW YORK - President Reagan,
denouncing sex discrimination as "just
as great an evil" as racial or religious
bias, embraced the goal of equality for
women yesterday while courting three
of New York's largest voting groups.
"When certain people, for political;
reasons, claim that I don't understand
the modern woman, I'm tempted to
say, 'Then how come I have two very in-
dependent daughters?' " Reagan said.
Reagan went on the offensive before
a conference on business ownership by
women.
"Each woman must have the
freedom to choose her path for herself,
and I'm committed to just that," the 73-
year-old Republican president said in
his prepared remarks.
"I've been frustrated by the percep-
tion that has been created about my
supposed lack of interest in the welfare
of women," Reagan said.
HE TOOK credit for more than a
dozen actions to improve economic op-
portunities for women and eliminate
legal discrimination and objected to
charges that he has an antiquated view
of the sexes.
Without mentioning his opposition to
the ERA, the proposed constitutional
amendment to outlaw sex
discrimination, the president said his

administration had fought
discrimination at all levels and cham-
pioned a series of tax measures that
benefit women.
Among them, he said, were
proposals to increase the child care tax
credit, reduce the marriage penalty,
expand tax deductions for Individual
Retirement Accounts and eliminate
estate taxes levied on surviving
spouses.
ALSO AMONG the action he cited
was appointment of a commission on
women's business ownership. Although-
he announced the panel last June 22,
Reagan met with the group for the first
time last Friday.
Reagan said he has named more than
1,400 women to top government jobs,
taken steps to remove discriminatory
references from federal laws and
regulations and been more aggressive
in bringing discrimination cases against
employers than Jimmy Carter.
But women's groups say 32 states now
provide child care service to fewer
children than in 1981 because of cut-
backs in federal aid under Reagan.
Reagan gave the controversy over
the impact of his budget cuts scant
mention in his speech. His message,
central to his re-election campaign,
was that economic recovery has done
more than "all the promises made in
the history of Washington, D.C.," to ex-
pand opportunities for everyone.
His second trip to New York in a mon-

AP Photo
President Reagan holds up a catchy T-shirt after addressing the Women
Business Owners of New York yesterday at Manhattan's Grand Hyatt Hotel.

th, described by the White House as an
official visit with tax funds, had heavy
political overtones.
Also on his schedule was a visit to a
day care center, a private meeting with

Jewish leaders, a brief visit with Arch-
bishop Joseph John O'Connor, the new
head of New York's Roman Catholic
archdiocese, and a speech to a state
federation of Catholic school parents.

Tas-s hits
Reagan's
chemical
war stand

MOSCOW (UPI) - The official Soviet news agency
Tass said yesterday President Reagan was trying to
cover up U.S. plans to stockpile chemical weapons
when he accused the Soviet Union of using toxic agen-
ts in Asia and Afghanistan and called for a worldwide
ban.
"This time again, Reagan used as another screen
to cover up those ominous plans the hackneyed inven-
tions of a Soviet military threat and an alleged use of
Soviet chemical weapons," the news agency said.
CALLING REAGAN'S proposal "propagandist
noise," Tass said it was "needed by him expressly for
the purpose of continuing to build up U.S. chemical
arsenals under its cover," it said.
In Washington, State Department spokesman Alan
Romberg said Soviet charges about U.S. chemical
warfare policies are "false and misleading. The are
obviously intended for propaganda effect to divert at-
tention from their own actions in this area."

Reagan did not single out the Soviet Union when he
said chemical weapons "have been used against
defenseless peoples in Afghanistan, in Southeast Asia
and in the conflict between Iran and Iraq."
BUT HE SAID at his news conference Wednesday,
'The Soviet Union's extensive arsenal of chemical
weapons threatens U.S. forces (and) requires the
United States to maintain a limited retaliatory
capability of its own until we achieve an effective
ban."
Reagan, who announced plans to offer the Soviet
Union a global ban on the production, possession and
use of all chemical weapons, is seeking $1.13 billion in
fiscal 1985 for chemical warfare projects.
"If we're going to have a chemical warfare ban or a
treaty banning them, you've got to have something to
bargain with," he said. "Without a modern and
credible deterrent, the prospects for achieving a
comprehensive ban would be nil."

Police
notes
Student hit by car
LSA sophomore Elizabeth Edmonds
was hit by a car and seriously injured
under rainy conditions Wednesday
night, according to Ann Arbor police.
She was admitted to the University
Hospital after she was hit crossing
South University near Washtenaw at
about 11 p.m., Sgt. Harold Tinsey said.
The driver of the car, Leroy Town-
send, 20, of Ann Arbor, was turning onto
South University from Washtenaw
when the accident occurred. Townsend
said he didn't see Edmonds until just
before the accident, according to Tin
sey.
Edmonds, who was dressed in dark
clothing, crossed outside the crosswalk,
Tinsey said. She was listed in fair con-
dition Thursday night.
- Randi Harris

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The Hollywood Comedy of Remarriage
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