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March 29, 1984 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-29

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 29, 1984 - Page 7
Senate considers Salvadoran aid

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON - A Democratic leader predicted
yesterday Senate approval of a compromise $61.7
million military aid package for El Salvador, but
Secretary of State George Shultz said he would resist
any move to cut off the aid if the government now
being chosen is overthrown in a military coup.
"I think it is not necessary and is inappropriate to
seem to be predicting that nossibility," Shultz said.
"The military in El Salvador has gone to great lengths
to depoliticize themselves. I don't see any evidence of
anything to the contrary."
Shultz made his remarks to the Senate
Appropriations subcommittee that oversees the State
Department budget.
SEN. DALE BUMPERS (D-Ark.), said he had
heard speculation about a possible coup if centrist
presidential candidate Jose Napoleon Duarte, who
led in Sunday's first round of voting in El Salvador, is
elected in a runoff expected to be held in May.
He asked Shultz if he would support an amendment
RSG supports

to cut off aid in that event.
"No, sir," Shultz said. "I think it would be
counterproductive to seem to be predicting that
possibility by adding something" to the measure.
THE SENATE IS expected to vote this week on a
bill that would provide $61.7 million in emergency
military aid to El Salvador in the current fiscal year.
The Appropriations Committee approved $93 million
in aid by a close vote earlier this month, but the
Reagan administration compromised on the lower
figure after Senate Democrats threatened to delay
action.
Congress has already approved $64.8 million in
military aid for the Central American nation in this
fiscal year, but ordered that $20 million of it could not
be spent until there is a trial and verdict in the case of
four American churchwomen murdered in El
Salvador in December 1980.
Sen. Daniel Inouye, (D-Hawaii), sponsor of the
compromise measure, told reporters, "It's going to
pass." Inouye is chairman of a Democratic task force

on Central America and senior Democrat on the
appropriations subcommittee that handles foreign
spending.
INOUYE SAID SEN. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.)
indicated in a meeting of the task force that he plans
to offer an amendment to provide only enough money
to last through May, withholding further
installments until after the runoff when the makeup
of the new government is known.
Harry Shlaudeman, whose appointment as peace
envoy to Central America was confirmed by the
Senate Tuesday, met with Reagan at the White House
on the eve of his departure for Honduras, El
Salvador, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua.
A SENIOR administration official s'aid"
Shlaudgman will depart on the trip today and try "to"
get the momentum going" and reinvigorate
diplomatic efforts that have lagged since his
predecessor, Richard Stone, resigned.
"It's a slow process," the official said. "I don't
think anybody expects him to work miracles."

some

form of student code

AP Photo
Lawyer Mary Evans arrives at Anderson County Courthouse yesterday
morning where she was sentenced to three years for helping convicted killer
William Kirk escape at gunpoint in March of 1983.
Lawyer convicted for
ai in prison escape

CLINTON, Tenn. (AP) - A mentally
disturbed lawyer who helped a prisoner
escape was sentenced to the maximum
three years in prison yesterday, after
refusing to repent or testify about their
4'% months on the run together.
Mary Evans, 27, who had originally
pleaded guilty to an escape charge in
return for probation, showed no
emotion as she was sentenced by
Criminal Court Judge James Scott.
SCOTT REFUSED to release her on
bond pending appeal. He said
Evans, described by doctors as a
suicidal schizophrenic, could be better
protected from herself in prison.
"I'm not surprised, nor is Mary sur-
prised. However, we do not feel justice
was done," said defense attorney
Robert Ritchie, who immediately ap-

pealed the denial of probation and bond
to the state Court of Criminal Appeals.
Evans was a court-appointed at-
torney defending William Timothy
Kirk, 37, on prison murder charges
when she arranged for him to be taken
from Brushy Mountain Penitentiary to
the Oak Ridge office of Dr. Gary Salk
for psychological tests on March 31,
1983.
She admitted to slipping Kirk a small
pistol, which he used to disarm three
guards. The couple took the. guards'
pistols and $25 from Salk's wallet and
fled in Evans' car, driving through
North Carolina and Florida, living in
motels and gambling at dog tracks.
FBI agents arrested them Aug. 17
outside a Daytona Beach, Fla.,
telegraph office where they had gone to
pick up money wired from Tennessee.

By JOHN ARNTZ
The Rackham student government
which will hold its presidential election
today, said yesterday it is in favor of
some sort of a code to regulate student
behavior outside of the classroom, but
did not wholly agree with the non-
academic code which the University
has propsoed.
Members of the group also said they
did not completely agree with all of the
Michigan Student Assembly's
criticisms of the proposed code.
HILLERY MURT, RSG's vice
president, said that RSG is planning to
issue a formal statement on the code
but is waiting for more information.
"We are in the process of making a
statement and we wish to have an ex-
plication of the code."
To get that ,explication, members
decided to ask University Affirmative
Action Director Virginia Nordby, who
has been very involved with the code, to
attend one of their upcoming meetings.
THE GROUP also decided to draft a
press release at its next meeting to ex-
plain its position on the proposed code.
Kodi Abili, an RSG representative,
said that RSG "is not against the MSA
statement, but just wants an indepen-
dent statement" that represents the
opinion of graduate students.
Another matter of concern to

graduate students, although not
discussed at the meeting, is the tax
which the federal government has
begun to assess on graduate assistants'
tuition.
.ANGELA GANTNER, an RSG coun-
cil member who recently returned from
a trip to Washington D.C. where she
met with local congressmen and their
staffs, said that she thought the taxes
would eventually be returned to studen-
ts, but not before Congress deals with
next year's budget and the controver-
sial items on the tax bill, Ganter said.
She said the tax waiver was not a con-
troversial part of the bill.
COMPUTERS FOR
THE FUTURE?
JAMES SULLIVAN,
Progressive Educators Network
at Noon Friday, March 30
GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
(lunch is available at $1)

THINKING OF BEING AN
ENGLISH TEACHER?
PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER. ENGLISH DEPT.
ORIENTATION MEETING
Thursday, March 29 7627 Haven Hall
Drop in between 4:30 and 5:30 p.m. for
information, overrides, refreshments
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL ALAN HOWES:
763-2269 (office), 662-9895 (home)

"in my job at the First National Bank of Chicago, I am
constantly using the knowledge acquired through my
paralegal training at Roosevelt.
"-Ant Brill Estates. Wills and Ltusts Graduate
LAWYER'S ASSISTANT:
A GROWTh CAREER
FOR THE 8015
Training as a Lawyer's Assistant can give today's college
graduate a valuable edge in the job market.
Entry-level positions in the (:hicago area pay as much as
$12,000to 15,000-and some paralegals are now earning
as much as $32,000,
It takes just three months of daytime study (six months in the
evening) toprepare for a career as a Lawyer's Assistant. The
program at Roosevelt University is the largest ABA-approved
program in Illinois, and its record of graduate employment
assistance is the best there is.
FOR INFORMATION AND A FREE BROCHURE
CALL (312) 341-3882
OR MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY!
RECRUITER WILL BE ON CAMPUS, APRIL 4,1984
-
R OSEvfiCrI' NIVERSl'T -
Lawyer's Assistant Program
-430 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago. Ill. 60605
In coo~peration %oth Tic Natio nal ( cnlcr fo r Parakvgal p aining
Please send me a cop of the Roosevelt Lawyers Assistant Program catalog.
I am interested in theLi Chicago or I Arlington Heights location.
Namc
Address,
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Approved for VA. and Ill. State Gdaranti&d l oans
Roosevelt University admits all students on the basis of individual
merit and without regard to race. color. sex or age

B aryshnikov praises

(Continued from Page 1)
questions about their visions of life in-
side and outside the Iron Curtain.
Brodsky said that his preconception
of America differed somewhat from the
reality he discovered upon arriving
here in 1972. "I imagined mostly what I
read in Robert Frost poems...the
spotlight was very reserved and
reticent - prudent souls. I was wrong.
It took me a while to find the existen-
tialism of the Robert Frost poems."
Sokolov said "When I came to New
York, Carl Proffer met me at the air-
port and we came here to Ann Arbor. It
became my first hometown.Irk
mediately I realized the image of the
United States was familiar to me. I was
back home (spiritually)."
THE FORUM, WHICH was planned
as a tribute to University Prof. Carl
Proffer, is hoped to be the forerunner to
a larger conference next year. Proffer,
who teaches Slavic languages and
literature, was instrumental in helping
Brodsky, leave Russia. Hle owns Ann
Arbor's Ardis Publishing, the premiere
publishing firm for emigre Russian
literature.
Baryshnikov considered America as
notes
Valium stolen
Less than $10 worth of Valium was
stolen from the University's Clinical
Pharmacology Building sometime
Monday night or early Tuesday mor-
ning, according to Ann Arbor police.
The thief forced open the rear door to
gain entry to the building. There are-
curently no suspects.
- Randi Harris
THE UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN
MEN'S
GLEE
CLUB
Patrick Gardner, Director

the land of "JFK, Marilyn Monroe,
Kirk Douglas...and there were two par-
ties - strange!"
Dovlatov, who now writes for the New
Yorker magazine, said that the U.S. is
"paradise. When I arrived here the
most striking thing was that it was
real."
ALESHKOVSKY, WHO alternated
between humor and seriousness, said
that he could sum up his feelings about
America in one word: freedom. "You
(Americans) don't share my sentiment
about that word," he said. "I was
released from prison twice; the second
time I landed in Vienna. Thoseesen-
sations of freedom are extremely sen-
sitive and profound."
All of the artists scoffed at questions
about their disappointments of living in
America. "I'm very disappointed, let
me tell you," Baryshnikov joked. "In
America you can dance with many dif-
ferent companies - I end up missing all
the books, films, are - things you
dream of doing in America. I just don't
have the time, it's that simple."
The language barrier didn't seem to be
a problem for the emigres, all but two
of whom spoke fluent English.
"I'M A SUCKER for the English
language," Brodsky said. He has recen-
tly begun writing some of his poems in
English.
Sokolov said "It's better just to be

lemocracy
born again here and start all over" with
the language.
Each of the panelists (except
Baryshnikov).served time in Russian
prisons before emigrating to the United
States.
ALESHKOVSKY SAID he was
grateful to his years in prison, "They
helped me become a mature person."
In Russia, as in the U.S., Baryshnikov
said the life of a premier ballet star is
one of privelege.
"I did have all the privileges and all
the artistic freedom. I had the highest
salary, a car, an apartment, I always
got the best tables in restaurants.. .but I
realized it didn't matter. Everything
was so provincial and so meaningless -
I had to go out and meet people and
read this guy's poetry (pointing to
Brodsky). That's why we're all here."
Members of the audience who veered
away from cultural questions were
usually met with short responses by
Proffer or the panelists. Brodsky was
asked in which country he found more
hospitality and warmth, the U.S. or
Russia?
"THAT QUESTION is pure gar-
bage," Brodsky said. "In either coun-
try there shouldn't be'developed a sense
of heirarchy between the people."
None of the Russian exiles expects to
return to his native land, although
Sokolov chuckled that he expects a coup
d'etat any day now.

Pnrb4!Wn
Phone 764-0558

STEPHEN T. MARSTON MEMORIAL LECTURE
"DEINDUSTRIALIZATION AND
THE ECONOMIC FUTURE OF MICHIGAN"
By

BARRY

BLUESTONE, DIRECTOR SOCIAL WELFARE RESEARCH
INSTITUTE, PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS, BOSTON COLLEGE

MARCH 29, 4:00 P.M.
ROOM, ALUMNI CENTER, WASHINGTON ST.

FOUNDERS

School of Education * Annual Awards Ceremony
"Shifting Priorities:
The Place of Education in the
United States and Other Cultures"
GUEST SPEAKER:
Urie Bronfenbrenner
Professor of Human Development,
Family Studies, and Psychology, Cornell University
Ph.D. in Education, University of Michigan, 1942
Author of Two Worlds of Children: U.S. and U.S.S.R.
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2 P.M.

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