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March 29, 1984 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-29

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'I

Wwn
ARTS
e Michigan Daily Thursday, March 29, 1984 Page 6

Grant plays house with 'baby'

Page 6

By Dan Desmond
S AD THAT the 1930s are remembered
'all too often for that damned
Depression.
It is certainly more agreeable to
think of that decade as the time that the
propelled many errant characters
through a screwball playland that
amounted to the most entertaining
iece of escapism in American cinema.
1 This was the age of the screwball
ebmedies and Bringing Up Baby by
koward Hawks stands out among
u~ovies of its ilk.
Cary Grant, whose perennially suave
demeanor filters through his passive
Oaracter, is a paleontologist bestowed
With two wonderful events at the outset.
ke is to wed a dull but practical fellow
INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
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$2.00 SHOWS BEFORE 6:00 P.M.
ENDS TONIGHT:
"FANNY & ALEXANDER' R) at :00, 8:00
STARTS FRI.!
"VIBRANT
EROTICISM"
-Molly Haskell,
Vogue Magazine
A FILM BY
CARLOS SAURA
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FRI. 1:00, 7:10, 9:10, 11:00
ENDS TONIGHT!
"BROADWAY DANNY ROSE,pG)
AT 1:00, 7:20, 9:35
STARTS FRI.!
"GENUINELY STARTLING!
The right audiences are bound to
appreciate the originality, the color,
rage, nonchalance, sly humor,
and ferocious fashion sense.
--Janet Maslin, N.Y. Times

museum worker who insists there shall
be no honeymoon because the museum
comes first. And Grant's greatest thrill
is a rare bone he receives that will
complete his dinosaur building venture.
Zaniness rears its winsome head
when Katherine Hepburn enters and
upstages all. Hepburn comes equipped
with a feline gift from her brother,
"Baby" the leopard. Hepburn raises
eyebrows but generates smiles with her
aggressive, extroverted behavior, and
sometimes frustrating compulsion to
interrupt whoever is speaking. While
leaving others in the dust of her fast-
talking and lighthearted pranks, she
makes a mockery of her stuffy, rich
peers yet somehow is, inescapably
alluring.
Grant is like metal to Hepburn's
magnet. Once in Hepburn's lair,
Grant's invaluable bone is burgled then
buried.by a pesky terrier, and "Baby"
ambles away from home. A chase en-
sues with Hepburn a head scout and

Grant right behind her armed with
precariousness and a net.
Lovestruck and no match for Hep-
burn's ingenuity, Grant usually winds
up looking hilariously ridiculous. This
is most visible when Hepburn sends
Cary's clothes out for cleaning while he
is showering, forcing Grant to dress
himself in her fur-lined satin robe.
Gangling and awkward-looking, he en-
dures embarrassment to the audience's
delight. Such bits inspire fitting respon-
ses from Grant like, "This is probably
the silliest thing that ever happened to
me," which sums up his reaction to all
of his adventures here.
By the time Grant recovers his bone,
loses his fiance, but retains Hepburn,
the viewer will most likely be
exhilarated by the fun. The pair romp
through the film as if they were playing
house. One never worries about
anything serious because they're just
playing around. Bringing Up Baby
delivers a superbly enjoyable piece of
escapism.
Showing Friday, Lorch Hall, 9:00 p.m.

'Going dol
other forbi
W HAT'S HUMID, subterranean,
illegal, and over 100 degrees in
places?
The question has intrigued many
students since the University steam
tunnel system was inaugurated
during the 1950s. Beneath our
glorious, oblivious campus spans over
seven miles of moist, warm passages,
stretching from North Campus to
President Shapiro's doorstep.
The tunnels serve an essential pur-
pose as the central heating system for
most campus buildings. Technically,
entry to this vast network of steel
tropics is illegal, but that hasn't
deterred generations of enterprising
students. "Going down," as some
veterans call the tunnel descent, is a
traditional sign of daring, defiance,
and general pluck.
The University has little ap-
preciation for such personal at-
tributes, and in concord with the
evolving authoritarian spirit, has
initiated a strick crackdown on tunnel
trespassers. A rash of recent captures
has left a number of students in
danger of criminal conviction and
possible University action, up to and
including expulsion.
An unauthorized steam tunnel jaunt
carries a misdemeanor charge of

wn
dd

en acts

and

Grant
... a sucker for a feline

USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS Records

The "greats" of jazz
in one performance!
SATURDAY
APRIL 7, 1984
8:00 p.m.
ORCHESTRA HALL Detroit
The Bob Wiber jazz Repertory Ensemble
(formerl yknovw as "Smithsonian Jaz
Repertory Ensem ble ollers classic jazzat
is best as Iheii' recretde the pIrfofrnanc((s
Io .I' ;cial jazz persnlities Ill mI he 20's
totloday. In on~u~lne M 1/flyu Gan 1heart 1he
son, Iis Water, Benny Goo~dman, Chai~e
I'rker, and Thelontius Monk as i hby wuld
play itthemselves.
Tickets, $15, $12, $9, 6
call pirethren Productions, 313271.4360
or Orchestra Hall, 313-833-3700)
Personal checks ┬░R' welcomed
Group Discounts (10 or more) Avalable.

Dan Fogelberg - 'Windows
and Walls' (Epic/Full Moon)

Dan Fogelberg's release of The In.
nocent Age in 1981 was a stunning toui
de force which erased any doubt.
about his strengths as a songwriter,
The 17 songs on this remarkable doubl(
album were virtually flawless in struo
ture and performance, and the albur
itself suggested that Fogelberg ha(
reached full maturity as an artist
1982's Greatest Hits included two nevi
songs of the same very high quality.
One of the songs, "Missing You," wa
a great commercial success as well
surprising some with its rocking
melody and Fogelberg's dominating
electric guitar. Apparently taking thi
to heart, Fogelberg incorporated then
same elements in much of his new LI
Windows and Walls, but unfortunatel
the results are ultimately less suc
cessful.
Fogelberg has, often been compare
stylistically with Jackson Browne, ar
in some ways both artists ari
developing their works in similar direc
tions. With an increased emphasis o,
electric guitar, Fogelberg is pressir
for recognition as a mainstrea:
rocker, and the new . album, lik
Browne's Lawyers In Love, is sell
conscious in its rock poses.
The most obvious example of this
Fogelberg's severely over-done coi
clusion to "The Loving Cup." The soi
is lyrically one of the more delicate o
AI
FRIDAY MAR
A
SATURDAY MAF
EAST QU

the album, but it is uncomfortably
coupled with a heavy-handed
arrangement which winds up with
a bombast of instrumentation and an
unexplainable dead-stop conclusion.
Two of the rockers on Windows and
Walls are more successful: "The
Language of Love" and "Let Her Go"
are cleaner productions and make for
interesting listening, although "Let Her
Go" would benefit from a slight tempo
increase.
Surprisingly the album suffers from a
lyrical weakness which may be the
result of an attempt at further ac-
cessability.The intricate lyricism of a
tune like "Nexus" (from The Innocent
Age) may be lost on the average
listener, but it's a considerable accom-
plishment compared to "Tucson,
Arizona (Gazette)": The characters in
this eight and a half minute epic are
lifeless in more ways than one, as Tony
ices a waitress on their first date and
kills himself in his '60 Chevy. It's a
good-boy-gone-bad story which has
been told before and didn't particularly
need to be told again.
The music is impressive but the
lyrics are pretty mundane, reflecting
the problem of Windows and Walls; this
time out Fogelberg's tunes fall short
more frequently than they click.
Although there are elements of ex-
cellence here, the album itself is not
among his best.
- Michael Baadke

(R)
FRI. 1:00, 7:25, 9:30, 11:20 P.M.

An evening with
STEVE GOODMAN
special guest
0. J. ANDERSON
This Saturday: 8:00
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater*
On sale now at the Union Ticket
Off ice and other Ticket World outlets
A MAJOR EVENTS PRODUCTION

"illegal entry," according to Ann Ar-
bor police spokesman Harold Tinsey.
Conviction brings a typical penalty of
$180 in fines and up to 72 hours of
social service. That's no hand slap.
Under the proposed student code,
furthermore, tunnelers face sanctions
ranging from a disciplinary
reprimand through outright dismissal
(under section 2.m and 8.a, b, and e,
no less), irregardless of whether they
are acquitted in a civil court.
The main University concern is
safety, according to Kenneth Baudry,
Manager of Utilities. "If there's a
steam leak and a kid passes out down
there, then you've got real trouble,"
Baudry points out.
Security is also threatened, says
Baudry, because the tunnel system
opens into many University buildings.
Tunnelers are generally more in-
terested in having a good time than in
going anywhere, however. "There's
really not much to do down there -
it's just the thrill of trespassing," says
Ted, a LSA senior and tunneling
veteran. "A lot of people like to go
down after a workout when they're in
sweats anyhow - especially in winter
when it's cold out."
Piping hot
Another experienced tunneler is
Bert (not his real name), one of the
graduate students who were nabbed
beneath the Union in February.
"It's kind of an adventure, to see
how far you can get without being
caught," says Bert, who had made
two underground trips before his
arrest. "People have gotten as far as
North Campus from the chem
building; I personally have been over
to CCRB."
So, what's it like in the forbidden
land?
"It's really hot in places," says
Bert. "You can stand up and there are
lights controlled by switches about
every 100 yards. You turn off the
lights behind you and turn on the ones
in front."

A word of caution: "Watch the
steam pipes - you can get burned,"
advises Bert.
Tunnelers are aided by markers
made by their predecessors, giving
directions, warning of motion detec-
tors, etc. Bert and his friends met
their demise when they set off a
motion detector at the entrance to the
Museum of Art.
These detectors are the main
reason for the University's increased
success rate in catching trespassers,
according to Baudry. Keeping tunnel
entrances locked remains the
primary defense against uninvited
visitors, however. Bert and company
entered through an unlocked passage
in the chem building.
In fact, Bert's "not guilty" plea
rests on the fact that his unimpeded
entry was, in fact, legal. "There are
no signs that say "Authorized person-
nel only'," Bert says. "We were not
.aware and were not made aware that
it was an illegal place to be."
Oh, come on.
"Obviously, it's not a place that
people would just happen to walk
down," Bert conceeds.
Secret Subservice
Tunneling, while never reaching
epidemic proportions, has always
found willing exponents. One story
goes that when Gerald Ford stayed at
Pres. Hal's place a few years back,
Secret Service agents wired the tubes
and raked in a mess of moles. Ted
knows of at least one University dorm
building director who "used to take
the tunnels over to med campus all
the time."
Also, the tunnels have long served
as a favored photographic subject for
such esteemed publications as the
Gargoyle and The Michigan Daily.
Last year's Best of Ann Arbor issue of
Weekend Magazine voted the tunnels
as one of the "Best places to go
get high" (the other was a regents
meeting).
Baudry vehemently discourages
that kind of publicity, saying it only
encourages students to violate the
rules and screw up the system.
"These are students on larks," he
says. "They think they can challenge
the system."
He's quite right, you know, and
what's more, there's a bundle of
security to back him up.
On the other hand, as Bert says, "If
you're not drunk out of your mind and
you don't lose your head, you can find
your way out of there." (pause).
"We probably could have gotten
away with it..."

Y TER N4 UTI U R ER I/R

WORKN fOR *4 C//4N6
ICH 30 8-10PM
ND
RCH 31 10AM-6PM
ADRANGLE

CAREER WORKSHOPS AND PANEL DISCUSSIONS ON:
EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY ART/THEATRE
LABOR SOCIAL SERVICES ORGANIZING
HEALTH SERVICES COOPS/BUSINESS
MEDIA LAW/GOVERNMENT
''SZN3CR Spo mr r ra r r r r r r
?JSns

.. .!O t ^')m-. , ty

r e ~ de-,,,at .-,,

I

A Musical Vaudeville
IU

I

I

O
.-0

RESIDENT THE DAILY
STAFF CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
POSITIONS W
Applications are available forA RESULTS
the 1984/85 Trotter House Resi-
dent Staff positions. For further CALL 764-0557
information call 763-4692.

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