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March 29, 1984 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-29

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Page 2- The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 29, 1984
Democratic candidates square of

IN BRIEF

NEW YORK (AP) - Walter Mondale
and Gary Hart clashed last night over
energy policy, with the former vice
president saying Hart voted with "big
oil" and the Colorado senator retorting
that Mondale was willing to "sacrifice
American lives" in a war for Persian
Gulf oil.
"I don't think we ought to lose
American lives fighting for someone
else's oil," said Hart.
"DON'T WORRY about Walter Mon-
dale and American lives," said the
former vice president. "I'll stand
strong there."
He defended his stance in Central
America, saying he would "not pull the
plug" on American forces stationed in
the region.
Debating six days before the New
York Democratic primary, the two
presidential candidates lost little time
going after each other in the nationally
televised debate broadcast from
Columbia University.
HART, criticized for moving too
slowly in supporting a nuclear freeze,
said "he knows he is no more commit-
ted to arms control than I am," and
charged that Reagan administration of-
ficials "torpedoed" an arms accord
with the Soviets in 1982.
Mondale went after Hart from the

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reporU
Police kill prisoners in Peru
LIMA, Peru - Police and guards opened fire and used tranquilizing gas to
put down a prison uprising in Lima, and 19 of the rioting prisoners were
killed, officials said yesterday.
The inmates burned, shot or stabbed four prison employees taken hostage
during the attempted escape. And, the body of a 20th inmate was found
yesterday, but it was not immediately known if he was among the rioters.
The police action Tuesday night rescued the hostages and ended a 13-hour
standoff with the inmates, who held nine prison employees and five fellow
prisoners hostage, officials said.
The inmates had seized the administration center and ward&i's office, and
authorities refused their demands for two vans for the escape from the 1,500-
inmate prison in downtown Lima.
Television viewers saw the prisoners stab one hostage in the leg
repeatedly, shoot another in the stomach and pour kerosene on a third before
setting him afire when their demands were not met. A fourth hostage, a'
prison psychologist, was shot in the throat.
Those four hostages remained hospitalized yesterday in critical condition,
said Luis Arancibia, a spokesman for the prison system. None of the hostage
was killed, Arancibia said.
Lava flow threatens Hilo, Hawaii

4

l

AP Photo
Moderator Dan Rather, left, joins hands with the three democratic presidential candidates at the start of the debate in
New York lasCnight. The candidates are, from left: Walter Mondale, second from left, Jesse Jackson, third from left,
and Gary Hart, right with back to camera.

I

beginning, first on Hart's vote against
the Chrysler bailout, then over energy
and arms policies.
Hart defended himself and chided
Mondale, saying he "doesn't always
characterize the record accurately."
MONDALE SAID Hart voted with

"big oil" with the Colorado senator
retorting "he knows better than that."
The Rev. Jesse Jackson said he sup-
ported the effort to save the 600,000 jobs
at stake when Chrysler was threatened
with bankruptcy, but he added, "jobs
are not enough.. . in slavery everyone

had a job."
Votes on the windfall profits tax and
the Chrysler bailout legislation were
also among the opening topics as Mon-
dale, Hart and Jackson sat around a
table with moderator Dan Rather of
CBS News.

Congress may extend discrimination penalties

WASHINGTON (AP) - The U.S. Commission on
Civil Rights recommended yesterday that Congress
allow the government to penalize an entire institution
for unfair discrimination, even when only part of the
institution is found guilty.
In a resolution, passed 5-2 with one member absent,
the panel also rejected affirmative action quotas to
remedy such discrimination.
IT SUGGESTED that the most severe penalty, a
federal aid cutoff, only be applied to specific
programs at colleges and universities where
You Could Be Qualified For A
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If you have the language fluency, the
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In addition there are places in Law, Medical
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discriminatory practices have been proven. The
government could stop discrimination in other
programs at the same school with court injunctions,
the commission said.
Commission Chairman Clarence Pendleton said he
supported the resolution so the commission could
present a consensus position to Congress, even
though he personally opposed applying sanctions to
programs throughout an institution to remedy a
specific instance of discrimination.
The agency's vice chairman, Morris Abram, also

backed the majority position, although he said the
Department of Education "has merely grown in
reach and insolence" under the Reagan ad-
ministration.
The commission position differs from that of the
Reagan administration, which has said that only the
program in which discrimination occurs should be
affected by federal sanctions.
The commission said its policy should apply to a
number of civil rights laws, including those affecting
discrimination based on race, sex age and handicap.

HILO, Hawaii - A mile-wide lava flow from Mauna Loa slowed but moved
to within seven miles of Hawaii's second-largest city yesterday, and residen-
ts living in its path made plans to leave if the molten rock threatened their
homes.
"I'll jump in one car and my wife will jump in another car and we'll grab
what we can," said Victor Souza, 34, whose home is among those nearest the
flow.
The forward edge of the main lava flow slowed during the night, advancing
only about a mile to within seven miles of homes in Hilo's upper Kaumana
section, said Reggie Okamura of the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian
Volcano Observatory.
There was no immediate danger to populated areas on the island of
Hawaii, he said.
Mauna Loa, which blew its top last Sunday in its first eruption in nine
years, showed no signs of any letup.
Polish students qit school, avoid
signing crucifix ban declaration,
MIETNE, Poland - Communist authorities have ordered defiant teen-
agers to obey a ban on crucifixes in classrooms or quit school, an official
confirmed yesterday. Many students said they were leaving.
Bishop Jan Mazur, meanwhile, entered the second day of a bread-and-
water fast to protest the government's position in the 3-week-old conflict
between church and state.
Ryszard Domanski, administrator of the agricultural high school where
the "war of the crosses" began, confirmed that the school's 600-plus students:
would be barred from class unless they or their parents signed a declaration
agreeing to abide by school regulations.
The declaration, recognizing the separation of church and state, indirectly
endorsesthe rerhoval of crosses ordered by the government.
The crosses have been a fixture'in classrooms and other public buildings'
for decades in this devoutly Roman Catholic country.

a Internship
DON A

Fighting leaves 47
dead in Lebanon

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MARYMOUNT COLLEGE, TARRYTOWN,
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(Continued from Page 1)
civil war combatants after nine years
of bloodshed.
LEBANESE TELEVISION showed
the committee - leaders of the rightist
Christian "Lebanese Forces" and of
the Druse and Shiite opposition-
meeting under Gemayel's chairman-
ship.
U.S. special Middle East envoy
Donald Rumsfeld, arriving from Tel
Aviv, met atethe palace with Foreign
Minister Elie Salem. The U.S. am-
bassador to Lebanon, Reginald Bar-
tholomew, attended the meeting.
In Beirut, smoke from burning fires
could be seen rising from several
neighborhoods in the eastern and west-
ern sectors after the two-hour bom-
bardment. Radio stations appealed for
blood donations as the firing tapered off
inthe late afternoon.
BEFORE THE shelling began a few
hours earlier, American University of
Beirut reported that a bomb exploded
in an empty classroom at 8:20 a.m. No
one was hurt.
Among areas bombarded in west
Beirut were the main Hamra shopping
center and the adjacent neighborhoods
of Sanaye, Sakiet el-Janzir and
Caracas.
In east Beirut, the densely populated
neighborhoods of Ashrafiyeh was
heavily bombarded by multiple-rocket
launchers. The shelling hit along the en-
tire 12-mile coastal stretch north of
Beirut to Jounieh.
Two television journalists working
for the UPITN television news agency
were killed by shells that exploded only
a few yards away as they were filming
the violence near the Sabra Palestinian

refugee camp.
A spokesman for UPITN identified
the two journalists killed as
cameraman Hani Tan and soundman,
Mohammed Temssah, both Lebanese.
Three journalists for foreign news
organizations have been killed since the
latest round of civil strife erupted in
August.
Correction
University VicesPresident for
Research Alfred Sussman said the
recommendation of a faculty-student
committee was "a paramount con-
sideration" in his decision to allow fun-
ding for an engineering professor's
research projects. A story in yester-
day's Daily incorrectly quoted
Sussman asysaying the committee's
recommendation was "a permanent
consideration."
MATH (MAJORS/MINORS!
APTITUDE)...
You're Needed All
Overthe Woid.
Ask Peace Corps Moth volunreers why
their degrees ore needed in the class-
rooms of the world's developing nations.
Ask them why ingenuity ond flexibility
are as vital as odapting to o different cul-
ture. They'll tell you their students know
Moth is the key to a solid future. And
they'll tell you that Peace Corps adds up
to a career experience full of rewards
and accomplishments. Ask them why
Peace Corps is the roughest job you'll
ever love.
PEACE CORPS

Drug trials may cut youth rights

.1

luff 6E lug -

I-

ILVI. El WL V

WASHINGTON - The growing concern over drug trafficking in the
nation's public schools clashed with student privacy rights yesterday in a:
spirited Supreme Court debate.
A New Jersey prosecutor said all drugs seized by public school officials,
even in unlawful searches, should be allowed as trial evidence when students'
are criminally prosecuted.
State Deputy Attorney General Allan Nodes said school searches must be
exempt from the "exclusionary rule" which bans evidence illegally seized,
by police.
"We don't want to turn school teachers into police officers," he said. "The
rule simply will not work with school teachers.. They are not part of.the law;
enforcement community."
But Lois DJulio, a lawyer representing a former Piscataway, N.J., High
School student, said allowing such an exemption will rob students of an im}
portant lesson - "that our constitutional system of government is more than
a collection of empty promises."
Senate rejects oil merger ban
WASHINGTON - The Senate refused yesterday to impose a year-long
moratorium on oil industry mergers, rejecting arguments that some $29
billion in takeovers announced in recent weeks pose unknown threats to the
nation's economy and energy supplies.
Senators voted instead to direct three of their committees to study the
merger trend and report back this summer with recommendations. The
alternative proposal carries no restrictions on the industry.
Supporters of a.moratorium said the alternative was a hollow shell that
meant nothing. But, said Sen. Bennett Johnston (D-La.), the sponsor of the
moratorium proposal, "I know how to count votes. We've been beaten on this
issue."
His comment came after the Senate voted 57-39 against a motion to table
in effect kill - the substitute proposal calling for a study.
After that vote, the Senate adopted on voice vote the proposal by Sens.
Robert Dole (R-Kan.) and David Boren (D-Okla.), that directs the study by
the Senate Finance, Energy and Judiciary committees. They are to report
back in 90 days on recommended Senate action.

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178
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Thursday, March 29, 1984
Vol. XCIV-No. 142
(ISSN 0745-967X)
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
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Editor-in-Chief..... ...BILL. SPINDLE SPORTS STAFF: Randy Berger, Sue Broser, Joe,
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News Editor JIM SPARKS Keaney, Ted Lerner, Tim Makinen, Aaam Martin'
Student Affairs Editor ....ACHERYL BAACKE Scott MeKinay, Barb McQuadeBrad Morgan.Phil
Opinion Page Editors........ JAMES BOYD Nussel, Sandy Pincus, Rob Pollard, Mike Redstone,'

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Arts/Magazine Editor............MARE HODGES
Associate Arts Editor...........STEVEN SUSSER
Chief Photographer...........DOUG MCMAHON
Sports Editor................. MIKE MCGRAW
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STEVE WISE

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