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March 23, 1984 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-23
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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Youth
hostel
Hotel New Hampshire
Starring Jodie Foster, and Beau
Bridges
Directed by Tony Richardson
Now playing at The State Theater
By Anne Valespino
AFLATUENT dog, a literary dwarf
and a lesbian in a bear suit ar
among some of John Irving's unlikel;
but lovable characters from the nove
Hotel New Hampshire. In the hands o:
director-producer Tony Richardson
M'ONDAYS
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their story becomes a series of
unrelated misadventures rather than a
poignant presentation of their
fascinating interrelationships.
A grossly miscast Beau Bridges
plays Winn Berry, a school teacher who
quits the profession to become a hotel
proprietor trying to run a family-
operated establishment on a shoestring
budget. A naive dreamer, Berry is
oblivious to the shady undercurrents of
hotel life that force his children to grow
up all too quickly.
Since Berry is a quirky individual it is
understandable that his kids have pain-
fully distinctive problems. Frank, who
is gay, must cope with the small-town
morals of a New England community;
Lily, whose maturity far exceeds her
physical development, has to accept
being labeled a dwarf. Franny, played
by Jodie Foster, is the most confused of
all. A young woman experiencing her
first signs of sexual awakening, she fin-
-

ds herself attracted to two males who
are polar opposites: Her brother John
is frail and baby-faced, while local thug
Chip.
This incestuous triangle develops into
a crisis which is the dramatic climax of
the film. On Halloween night Franny
and John are sent to fetch a doctor after
a policeman at the hotel has succumbed
to a stroke induced by some family an-
tics. On their way through the forest
they are trapped by Chip and his frien-
ds, out looking for Halloween mischief
of their own. Seizing this opportunity,
Chip decides to torture both brother and
sister by leading his cohorts in the
gang-rape of Franny.
John panics and runs for help. By the
time Junior and his black 'brothers'
reach the. scene, the worst is already
over. John is paralyzed by feelings of
guilt and helplessness. Strong, level-
headed Junior comforts Franny in a
heart-wrenching speech, ". . . when
someone touches you and you don't
want them to be touchin' you, it's like
they don't touch you at all, 'cause they
can't hurt the real you, deep inside of
you."~
Foster's manifestation of physical
and emotional shock make this the
most powerful scene in the movie.
Because it is so vivid and difficult to
recover from, and since it takes place
early in the film, the rest of this picture
seems a lame tragi-comedy in com-

parison.
Perhaps Irving's fondness for jux-
taposing humor and disaster, with no
attempt at gaining perspective on
either are to blame.- . Condensing his
plot into a two hour film is a precarious
task. All we see of the aircraft ex-
plosion that kills Berry's wife and son is
the stuffed carcass of Sorrow, the
family's farting Fido of many years,
floating ashore in the Atlantic.
Richardson's decision to include
many scenes rather than a select few
make for a fast-paced screenplay in
which actors have no time to reflect, in-
teract, or endear themselves to the
audience.
The film is worth seeing for a brilliant
performance by Jodie Foster who is
bewitching as a tough, plump teenager
and for Natasia Kinski whose cameo
role proves that beauty can become a
beast if she believes herself so. Unfor-
tunately the viewer must suffer a
glossy performance by Rob Lowe
whose looks almost made me believe I
had sinned against my cinema-going
creed-never see a movie with Robby
Benson in it-never!
One lingering scene sums it up.
Berry tells a fairy tale of a clown he
knew who committed suicide. One of
the props includes a colorful cart with
hand-painted lettering on the side "Life
is serious, art is fun". Too bad Richar-
dson's film tells us little about either. l

sure
Female Parts
Performance Network
Playing now through April 1

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OR EEND~iZ
EMPLoYtEE5
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By Emily Montgomery
N TODAY'S society women often find
themselves forced into a multitude of
different roles. , These roles have
become the subject of a Franc Rame
and Dario Fo (two Italian, comedic
playwrights) play entitled Female Par-
ts, directed by Robin Smith and curren-
tly in the middle of a four week run at
The Performance Network.
The play consists of four one-woman
acts, each dealing with a different
aspect of womanhood.
The first act, "Waking Up," focuses
on the pressures a woman faces inahn-
dling the multiple roles of wife, mother,
housekeeper and working woman. Liz
Zweifler, who was so wonderful as
Tracy Lord in the Ann Arbor Civic
Theatre Production of Philladelphia
Story, is frantically energetic in this
role. This is especially noted as she
talks aloud to herself and her baby (a
plastic doll which obviously isn't old
enough to understand) while trying to
get ready for work. One cannot help but
empathize with her while at the same
time giggle in amusement at the spec-
tacle she presents: One particularly
hilarious scene occurs when she
sprinkles grated cheese on the doll's
bottom and, after realizing, puts it back
into the can, commenting, "We can't af-
ford to waste cheese."
The second act, equally entertaining,
is called "A Woman Alone." This act
follows the experiences of a woman
trapped into the role of wife and
housemother. Laura Smith is en-
joyable in this act, portraying the role

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of the woman literally "locked in"
everyday by her overprotective
husband (who, incidentally, also calls
her every 10 minutes from work).
In a style similar to Lily Tomlin,
Smith is captivatingly funny as she
talks with neihboring tenants, one of
whom is a "peeping Tom" of sorts.
Although'Smith rants and raves about
him when she sees him "peeping," she
seems entertained while at the same
time she fights off the amorous affec-
tions of a young boy she once had an af-
fair with before her "imprisonment."
(A special note of mention to the
anonymous arm that appeared in this
scene.' You'll have to go to find out what
that means, because I can't explain it
any further).
The third scene is titled "The Same
Old Story." Felicia Villani did a good
job with this difficult role of how a
woman is sometimes treated as just an
object of sexual desire by some men.
Villani also related effectively the
terror and pain a woman faces during
either an abortion or the labor of birth,
probably the hardest part of
womanhood and a very hard part to
portray on stage.
The second half of Villani's scene is a
slide show with Villani narrating. It is a
story high in symbolism, in effect,
telling how a girl grows into a woman
and dispels the myths of childhood that,
for instance, "babies come from cab-
bage patches," or "there is a handsome
prince out there, for every women, just
looking for a bride."
Michele Kelly was responsible for
designing the cartoon-style slides used
in this portion of the show and should be
commended on her talented and
humorous artwork.
All three actresses return to the stage
for the last act titled "Medea."
Reaching back into Greek mythology,
the point of this scene is aptly made,
using "Medea," a Greek scorceress,
who, after her husband Jason left her,
killed her own children, as an example.
The play lasts 2 hours, with a 10
minute intermission midway. Ticket
prices are, Thursdays and Sundays,
fascinating projects. In collaboration
with the Ann Arbor Symphony Or-
chestra they have presented
Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf. In Can-
terbury Loft's production of Equus the
ensemble choreographed their own
roles as the horses.
They have also performed com-
munity services, creating a 45-minute
program on the concepts of energy
management for a project jointly spon-
sored by the Michigan Municipal.
Department of Commerce, and the
National Community Energy
Management Center.
Their uniquely inventive qualities
come from their ability to draw from
diverse backgrounds. Only one mem-
ber, Miriam Kafian, is a full-time per-
forming artist. A theater student at the
University, Kaplan recently appeared
in Comings and Goings at the Perfor-
mance Network. Lisa Sanderson and
Carl Wittwer are actively pursuing
careers in medicine, Anne Zald is a
Library Scientist while Matthias
Schubert, Kristin Vanden Berg and Ann
Woelk study Aerospace Engineering,
Spanish, and Sociology, respectively.
Much of the artistic impetus for their
creative endeavors comes from don-

Female Parts: Anatomy of a lifestyle

$5.00, and Fridays and Saturdays, $6.00,
with a $1.00 student discount for all per-
formances. Curtain time is 8:00 p.m.
der-director Perry Perault. A full-time
Mechanical Designer for the Environ-
mental Research Institute, he has been
inventing stories without words for 10
years. All the pieces on "Mimoses" are
original and were written ir created
under Perault's supervision.
In this performance the University

for all s:
nature of
ded for ch
Mime Tro
anniversa
timate-At
"Germ W
Window
"Once,
"The Car
"The Dre

University Mime Troupe
University Activities Center
East Quad Auditorium
8 p.m., Thursday, March 29

Hotel New Hampshire: Hostile youths

By Anne Valespino
T HE TROUPE which brought you "It's
Mime, all Mime!" last spring will
present a brand new production this
spring called "Mimages," a medley in-
corporating both traditional and ex-
perimental styles.
If the group looks familiar it's only
because they have been an active part
of the performing arts scene in Ann Ar-
bor for the past four years. In that short
time the eight-member team has lent
their talents to some diverse and

Order your
DeIli
and many other unm
PARTY TRAYS 2.50 and up
CREATE YOUR OWN COMBINATIONS
" Kibbi
" Spinach Pie
" Taboulen
" Lady Fingers
Mon. -Thur. 7-6 " Chicken Artichoke Salac
Fri. 7-9; Sat. 7-5

4 Weekend/Friday, March 23, 1984

-

cretie ndavrs oms ro dun

9 Weeker

- . -- N %

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