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March 23, 1984 - Image 15

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-23
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Cheain
without
guilt
By Sharon Silbar
FEW STUDENTS can look you in the
eye and say they never do it. The
temptation is compelling, the oppor-
tunity is great, and the reward is even
greater.
It's the ideal way to beat the system
and easy to do. The only risk is getting
caught-and that doesn't happen very
often.
Unlike past years when students who
plagiarized or cheated were a rarity,
today the anomaly is finding a student
who in four years at the University
hasn't cheated.
Making up a few sources on a term
paper, copying a roomates' essay, or
turning in a fraternity brother's old lab
report are all commonplace and largely
acceptable practices.
Although each incident violates the
University Code of Academic Conduct
and could result in probation or suspen-
sion, the reality is that most students
who cheat will never sit before the
academic judiciary. ,
In the past 10 years, the number of
reported cases of cheating,
plagiarizing, and falsifying records has
more than doubled. But those numbers
are relatively small compared to ad-
ministrators' and professors' estimates
of unreported cases.
Students who plagiarize say it's sim-
ply more convenient to make up a sour-
ce for a term paper than to spend hours
searching through periodicals at the
library.
And that need fqr convenience seems
to have replaced students' sense of guilt.
Many students have become virtual
professionals at plagiarizing with little
or no feeling that they are doing
anything wrong.
"I honestly would like to meet the
person who could look me in the eye and
admit to me that he's never cheated on
an exam, copied a paper, or bettered
themselves at the expense of someone else
else," says Brad, a senior in LSA.
"You want to get by, get the good
grade, and get out of here. People I
know are willing to do anything for an
'A' in a class at the University of
Michigan."
Brad, who asked that his real name
not be used, plans to go to medical
school after he graduates. Yet grades
were not the primary motivation for the
many used lab reports he has turned in
to professors.
"I don't think I'm doing it to better
myself. I'm doing it to convenience
myself," he explains. And the penalties
are not a deterrent.
"I don't see how in a million years
you could ever get caught. There are
new teaching assistants every
semester, (and) each year.
"A lab repo't is one out of 500 turned
in every week."
Like Brad, most students who cheat

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or plagiarize don't have to. They are
bright, articulate, and can certainly do
the work on their own. They also have
their limits.
Brad, who has no qualms about using
someone else's lab report, says he
would never copy material from a
magazine or journal. "You've got to
draw the line," he says. "Everyone has
morals."
But ethical concerns decrease when
students feel overwhelmed by
academic pressure. Students can
justify cheating or plagiarizing as a
way to cope with the seemingly im-
possible demands of classes.
Professors expect a great deal from
students and each teacher considers his
or her class the most 'important.
Professors seem to gang up on students
by scheduling midterms or papers
during the same week.
Students see plagiarizing as a
necessary way out.
"I had to get good grades because I
play (a varsity sport)," said Anne, an
LSA senior, who talked under the con-
dition that her real name not be used.
"I've gotten a stolen test, used other
people's papers, and even handed them
in to the same professor.
"I would cheat to get by if I was going
to fail the class."
In an informal survey of 25 students
around campus, 23 said they had
cheated in some way. At first some
students adamantly denied such acts,
but as they talked, they recalled in-
cidents of plagiarism or cheating.
Once-in-a-while occurrences happen
with so little thought, that students
don't think they've done anything
wrong.
"I did cheat on a Spanish test,"
recalls one student studying in the
Michigan Union commons. "The
teacher would leave the room for a
couple of minutes and people would ask
about a few words."

For other students, however, bending
the rules has become habit.
Donna regularly uses imaginary book
titles, articles, and quotes in her
papers. "If you have a good paper and
you learn from it, why should you need
10 sources?" says Donna, an LSA
senior.
"I don't lose any sleep over it. Odds
are they are not going to pick your
paper (to check sources)."
Martin, a senior in communication

Martin says he wouldn't copy a
friend's old paper because he likes
writing. "I think I write well." He's
right. Martin says he has never
received anything lower than a "B" on
a paper.
Fudging sources certainly doesn't
subvert the learning process, he insists.
"You can't completely make it up. You
still learn. You learn everything you
want to."
Eventually Martin would like to be a

'Maybe I'm an old-fashioned moralist, but
I think (plagiarizing) is a major character
flaw.'
-James Gindin
English prof.

tempo.
The Temptations and The Four Tops
Office of Major Events
Hill Auditorium
7:30 and 10:30 p.m., Friday, March 23
By John Logie
THE TEMPTATIONS are the Four
tops both formed in the 1950s. Both first
achieved national recognition in 1964, on
Motown records. The Temptations for
"The Way You Do The Things You Do,"
and the Tops for "Baby I Need Your
Loving." I was born in 1965. Why then
have I bypassed concerts by newer
groups in order to see a pair of groups
that have members older than my par-
ents?
My interest in the Motown recording
artists of the '60s was, interestingly
enough, spawned by my interest in the
British invasion. In 1979 I heard Barrett
Strong's recording of "Money (that's
What i want!)," a song which I had
always associated with the Beatles. A
close examination of my British-
invasion records revealed that a large
percentage of the cover versions sung
by the British bands were written by
Berry Gordy, or Smokey Robinson, or
Holland-Dozier-Holland.
So I sought out the originals. My in-
terest was fueled by the recent ex-
plosion of Motown nostalgia, sparked
by the 25th Anniversary of the legen-
dary record corporation. The hoopla,
most notably the Grammy-winning
television special, coupled with
Lawrence Kasdan's inclusion of many

The Temptations: Can't top the Temps

boasts that in four years at the Univer-
sity, he has never written an authentic
paper.
Martin is bright, receives high
grades, works a full-time job, and says
he would never run the risk of cheating
on a test. "I'm afraid I'd get caught,"
he says.
But plagiarizing is a different game.
He has submitted papers with
bibliographies containing sources that
he had neither used nor seen.
One paper he turned in listed 15 false
sources he says. "I didn't even look at
(the sources.) I either make up the
quote or just use one of the sources and
keep pulling quotes from it and at-
tributing (the quotes) to different sour-
ces."

television news anchorman, but despite
several communication classes, he
hasn't learned yet how to conduct an in-
terview.
"I had a final project due that had to
be two 20-minute documented inter-
views. I never interviewed the people -
completely made it up. I got an 'A' on
that," he says.
"I was so proud of it."
Not all students rely on their own
creativity to get by in classes. Most
campus fraternities and sororities are
endowed with complete files of old
exams, papers, and lab reports for
practically every major course at the
University.
In order to join some fraternities,
members must promise to submit their

Motown classics on the soundtrack for
The Big Chill, has exposed people my
age to the music that the "new music"
artists of today look to for inspiration.
Artists from Boy George to Marshall
Crenshaw, from Adam Ant to Elvis
Costello, all cite Motown groups as
having great influences on their
musical development.
Both groups have demonstrated a
capacity to adapt to the many changes
the music industry goes through
without ever losing a hold on the sound
and feel that has attracted fans for the
past 20 years. For this reason the
crowds Friday night will be incredibly
diverse - 45-year-old fans of soulful
ballads will sit side-by-side with high-
school funk fans - 20-year-old
nostalgics will set next to disco hold-
outs.
These groups are Motown. Each

possess the feeling of "family" that
Berry Gordy worked so hard to engen-
der among the early groups. Each is ex-
traordinarily long-lived. Each is made
up of extra-ordinary vocal talents
backed up by some of the finest produc-
tion and songwriting talent in the in-
dustry. The similarities go on and on.
Whoever came up with the brilliant
idea of pairing the two on the anniver-
sary special invited a direct com-
parison, so that now the two groups are
engaged in healthy competition.
The Four Tops, Levi Stubbs, Abdul
"Duke" Fakir, Lawrence Payton, and
Renaldo "Obie" Benson, have known
each other since childhood. They star-
ted out playing high school dances and
church socials as The Four Aims, but
it was the pairing of the Tops'harmony
with the songwriting team of Holland-
Dozier-Holland that made them stars.
The Tops reeled off hit after hit during
the '60s and early '70s like, "I Can't
Help Myself (Sugar Pie Honey Bun-
ch)," and "Reach Out, I'll Be There."
After a short association with.
Casablanca records the Tops rejoined
Motown immediately after the An-
niversary special, and were reunited
with Holland, Dozier, and Holland, who
contributed six songs to the group's
most recent album, Back Where I
Belong.
The Temptations, by contrast, have
gone through several personnel
changes in their 20 year history, but
have never strayed from the general
level of excellence they set for them-
selves in 1964. The two remaining
original members, Melvin Franklin and
Otis Williams, are unquestionably at
the heart of the Temptations. As the
group leader, Williams is responsible
for the inspiration, and Franklin is.

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STUDY ABROAD

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in Canterbury, England
Demanding tutorial instruction by British uni-
versity faculty. Institute for American Universities,
73 Castle St., Canterbury CT1 2QD

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540 E. Liberty St. 76
Corner of Maynard 4

Nissen: The man most student plagiarizers never see

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10 Weekend/Friday, March 23, 1984

3 Week(

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