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February 08, 1984 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-02-08

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, February 8, 1984
Teen marijuana
By CURTIS MAXWELL
Marijuana use by high school students has dropped to Still, the decline is "ane
the lowest rate since 1975 according to a national downturn, .. is real and con
study by University researchers. The drop could also refle
The daily use of marijuana has fallen by one half concerned about the p
from 10.7 percent in 1978 to 5.5 percent in 1983 which is marijuana, according to th
the lowest level since the study of 17,000 high school National Institute on Drug A
seniors began in 1975. According to the report, the THE REPORT shows th
number of high school seniors using marijuana has school seniors surveyed
dropped from 51 percent to 42 percent; also a record marijuana use causes harm
low since the study began. number jumped significant
BUT University social psychologist Lloyd John- percent of the students s,
ston who directed the study said there are still many health risks.
students who experiment with illicit drugs. "(Students) seem to be n
And other researchers who worked on the study say great risk of physical harm
alcohol consumption may be replacing marijuana psychologist Patrick O'Ma
use. , the study.

use cut in half

encouraging sign that the
tinuing," Johnston said.
ct that students are more
ossible health risks of
he study sponsored by the
Abuse.
at 63 percent of the high
believed that regular
nful physical effects. That
ly from 1978 when only 35
aid they feared possible
more concerned about the
n," said University social
lley who also worked on

Part of the students' concern could be linked to the
recent drug-related death of John Belushi and
Richard Pryor's accident involving free-basing
cocaine, said O'Malley.
THE NUMBER of students who said they disap-
proved of marijuana also rose from 68 percent in 1978
to 85 percent in 1983.
Other drug categories including amphetamines,
barbituates, quaaludes, and LSD also showed a
decline, according to the study which surveyed
seniors in 130 high schools across the nation.
The results also indicate that the widespread drug
use during the 1960s and 1970s has come to an end,
said William Pollin, director of the National Institute
on Drug Abuse.

I

Astronauts make first
untethered spacewalk

From AP and UPI
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla - Two
elated astronauts donned "Buck
Rogers" jetpacks, cast off their
lifelines and zoomed from Challenger
like science fiction heroes yesterday,
soaring 175 miles above earth on the
first free flights in space.
Orbiting the world at 17,500 MPH,
Bruce McCandless and Robert Stewart,
unhooked their lifelines and slowly rose
up, up and away from Challenger,
carried by a $10 million jet-powered
backpack to a distance greater than the
length of a football field.
NEVER before in 59 space walks - 46
American and 13 Soviet - had a man
ventured out without a lifeline.
Yesterday's exercise was a rehearsal
for the next shuttle flight when other
space walkers will try to retrieve an
ailing satellite, bring it into the cargo
bay for repair, and release it to orbit

again.
Unfortunately, that procedure won't
be possible for the two communications
satellites launched on this 10th flight of
the space shuttle. The satellites, laun-
ched for Western Union and Indonesia,
were in a useless low orbit. They were
intended for high orbit and lack fixtures
for retrieval.
McCandless, who has spent more
than a decade preparing for his historic
but brief flight, happily parodied Neil
Armstrong's words upon becoming the
first man to step on the moon in 1969.
SAID MCCANDLESS: "That Inay
have been one small step for Neil, but
it's a heck of a big leap for me."
When the space walkers had re-
entered the Challenger, after five
hours, 55 minutes outside, Mission Con-
trol congratulated them on a super job.
"It was a real thrill, a real honor to be
up here," said McCanless.

Fashion footwear

Daily Photo by REBECCA KNIGHT

Computer department's
merger nears final decision
(Continuedi from Pag~e 1)__.

IN BRIEF
Complied from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Congress says Central America
aid depends on hmnan rights
WASHINGTON - Warning that "time is short," Henry Kissinger urged
Congress yesterday to pump billions of dollars in economic and military aid
into Central America to counter Soviet and Cuban threats to U.S. interests in
the troubled region.
The former secretary of state, however, encountered skepticism among
members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, including Paul
Tsongas (D-Mass.). He said the Kissinger plan "just won't pass Congress"
as long as the Reagan administration refuses to make human rights
progress a condition of continued U.S. aid.
Kissinger testified in behalf of the recommendations of President
Reagan's National Bipartisan Commission on Central America, which he
headed. The panel, appointed last summer to recommend long-term policies
toward the region, issued a report last month outlining broad political,
economic and social reforms backed by a five-year, $8 billion economic-aid
program and increased military assistance.
Kissinger told the senators that failure to adopt the commission plan as a
package could "cost our nation dearly ... as turbulence and subversion in
Central America spread.
~r0
KKK suit a victorymin principle'
KALAMAZOO - A federal judge yesterday ordered the government to
pay Freedom Rider Walter Bergman $50,000 in damges for failing to prevent
a Ku Klux Klan attack at an Alabama civil rights demonstration 23 years
ago.
Although the award was just a fraction of the $2 million he sought, the 84-
year-old retired Wayne State University professor from Grand Rapids said
he was satisfied his suit against the FBI was "a victory in principal."
U.S. District Judge Richard Enslen, who ruled last May the FBI was liable
for the beating, awarded Bergman $35,000 as compensation for the physical
and emotional injuries he suffered in the beating. An additional $15,000 was
awarded the estate of Bergman's wife, Frances, for her emotional suffering.
Bergman has sought $1 million for himself and $1 million for his wife's
estate, claiming the Klan beating led to surgical complications during a
routine appendectomy four months later that left him confined to a
wheelchair for life.
December deaths linked to cold
WASHINGTON - Two weeks of bitter cold in late December may have
figured in a spurt of more than 6,00,0 deaths across the United States, gover-
nment weather experts estimate.
The national death toll from all causes increased 6,012 above the total for.
the same two-week period in 1982, when mild weather prevailed, said the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
"There was an increase in deaths, and we think cold had, a lot to do with
it," said Doug LeComte of NOAA's Assessment and Services Information
Center in Washington.
While deaths as a direct result of cold weather, such as freezing, are far
less than the total, LeComte said extreme cold "would contribute to deaths
from things such as influenza, pneumonia, fires and car accidents."
However, he said, "We have to be very careful. Without further research,
about all we can say is there was this increase in deaths; and it corresponds
to colder weather"
Misoi man shoots four, self
DE SOTO, Mo. - Investigators said yesterday that severe headaches and
paranoia about "communist" school administrators drove a junior high
school science teacher to kill four people and himself.
A charred body tentatively identified as that of George Brandon, 43, was
one of two found Monday in his rura' homeamid stockpiles of machine guns
and hand grenades.
.,..Authorities said Brandon, a teacher in the well-to-do St. Louis suburb of
Kirkwood since 1966, killed himself after going on a two-county rampage in
which he shot to death his ex-wife, a former school supervisor, the man's
wife, and a neighbor.
Brian M. Matheny, 52, and his wife, Betty, 53 were the first victims. They
were shot inside their home near Leslie, about 70 miles southwest of St.
Louis. Matheny also was a science teacher and once was Brandon's super-
visor in Kirkwood.
Detective David Connor of the Franklin County Sheriff's Department said
a note found near the Mathenys' bodies said: "They're all communists."
After killing the Mathenys, police said Brandon drove 20 miles back
toward St. Louis where he shot and killed his neighbor, JosephLennemann,
51, and his ex-wife, Barbara Moore, 45.
PRut pupils to work, Reagan says
LAS VEGAS - President Reagan said yesterday that schools should crack
down on discipline problems and make pupils work harder, arguing "we
cannot allow our children to continue falling behind."
In a speech to a convention of school administrators, Reagan took credit
for reversing a decline in America's educational system.
"Since our administration put education at the top of the American agen-
da,' he said, "we've seen a grassroots revolution that promises to strengthen
every school in the country."
Reagan also said that "those who constantly call for more money are the
same people who presided over two decades of unbroken educational

decline.
The president spoke here as his administration engaged in intense efforts
to bolster the sagging government of Lebanese President Amin Geymayel
after the resignation of his prime minister and Cabinet and the loss of west
Beirut to Moslem militiamen in fierce fighting.

Ugly Tennis Shoe Contest organizer Sheri Lendzion holds a choice entry at
the I.M. Building yesterday. Although it's too late to enter your own smelly
sneakers, you can still vote on everyone else's at the I.M. Bldg. through Feb.
17.
SA C* Lunch Program on
JOB NEGOTIATION:
Salary Negotiation, Clarifying Job
Expectations, and Making a Clgsing Agreement
Presented by: Mr. David Gruner, Director of Career Directions
12:30- 1:30
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9
Alumni Center
*Student A lumni Council
for info: 763-9740
Next Program: March 15 - PERSONAL MONEY MANAGEMENT

placed in the engineering school,
students would still be able to receive
computer degrees from LSA, Frye said.
He also said the department's classes
would be open to LSA students who are
not majoring in computer studies.
FOR THE TIME being, the depar-
tment will be housed in the East
Engineering Building, although it will
eventually be moved to North Campus
with the rest of the engineering college.
Currently the LSA computer depar-
tment is housed in Haven and Mason
Hall, and'the engineering computer
department is already located in East
Engineering.

Fry said that the merger would not
change the number of professors in
each department.
Administrators in both departments
expect the merger would eliminate
duplication of computer courses at the
University.
"Right now, the core of the two
programs, the computer training cour-
ses, are the same," said Prof. Daniel
Atkins, an assoeiate engineering dean.
"The electives chosen by the two dif-
ferent students in the programs are
what makes them different . . . In ef-
fect, the department will be stronger,
and the degree that students receive
will be more valuable."

Marines pulled offshore as
Beirut violence worsens

EVEN STRAIGHT A'S CAN'T
HELP IF YOU FLUNK LIFE
And life means having a choice

Nz,.
;' pc . sV J

WITH CUTS IN FINANCIAL AID COMING
FROM ALL SIDES, IT SEEMS LIKE THERE
IS ONLY ONE OPTION LEFT FOR PEOPLE
WHO NEED AID BADLY.
BUT THAT IS NOT TRUE.
JOIN THE MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY'S
FINANCIAL AID COMMITTEE AND LEARN

(Continued from Page 1)
Lebanon and thereby help ensure
security in the Beirut area.
Marines and Lebanese army units
had shared control of the airport. But
in recent days, anti-government
Moslem forces moved closer to the zone
and there have been reports that the
Lebanese army was allowing the rebels
to move through checkpoints.
"those who conduct these attacks will
no longer have sanctuary from which to
bombard Beirut at will," the president
said. "We will stand firm to deter those
who seek to influence Lebanon's futre
by intimidation."
"If a moderate government is over-
thrown because it had the courage to
turn in the direction of peace, what
-hope can there be that other moderates
in the region will risk committing
themselves to a similar course,"
Reagan said.
THE SENIOR administration official
said "the government of Lebanon
agrees with us that the -kind of
multinational force presence we're
talking about will be much more helpful
to them."
Alan Romberg, the State Depar-
tment's deputy spokesman, said 22 em-
bassy employees and 17 dependents

were evacuated from the U.S. embassy
facilities in Beirut to American ships
offshore and then transferred to Cyprus
in "a prudent response" to the fighting.
Thirty-six American personnel
remained in Beirut and the "embassy
continues to operate for all essential
functions," Romberg said.
One U.S. official, who insisted on
anonymity, said there were no plans
"at this time" to evacuate more
Americans.
Ice-
notes
Dorm room burglarized
A West .Quad room was broken into
Feb. 4 between 1 and 9 a.m. Burglars
entered the dorm room's unlocked door
and stole a watch, cash, and clothing
valued at less than $200. The case is
currently under investigation by police,
who said there are no suspects.
-Nancy Gottesman

HOW PAYING YOUR TUITION DOES NOT MEAN FORGETTING ABOUT YOUR

INDIVIDUAL VALUES AND CHOICES.

CALL 763-3241

OR COME TO A MEETING WEDNESDAY AT 4:00 3909 MICHIGAN UNION

Wednesday, February 8, 1984
Vol. XCIV-No. 107
(ISSN 0745-967X)
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
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Editor-in-Chief ...............BILL SPINDLE D'Andreta. Jim Davis, Scott Dimetrosky, Gary Ef-
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Associate Arts Editor ............STEVEN SUSSER Weidis, Steve Wise, Andrea Wolf.
Chief Photographer .......... .. DOUG MCMAHON Business Manager ......... . STEVE BLOOM
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