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February 05, 1984 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-02-05

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ARTS

te Michigan Daily

Sunday, February 5, 1984

Page 5

Harpsichordist at Union

By Anne Valdespino
IT'S A LITTLE-known fact that Ann
Arbor is a thriving center for Early
Music. Even musicians around town
and enthusiastic concert-goers take
groups like Ars Musica for granted.
But the truth is that connosieurs of
Medieval Renaissance and Baroque
music look to Ann Arbor as a haven, a
mecca, and an inspiration because of
its reputation -for producing early
music-makers with new and eclectic
ideas.
Such a budding star is Bradley
Brookshire. A native of Michigan,
Brookshire earned his undergraduate
degree in piano from the University's
music school.. There he gradually
developed an interest in historical
music and took up organ and har-
psichord; the keyboard instruments of
the 16th and 17th centuries.
Since then he has performed many
times in Ann Arbor and at two major in-
ternational competitions; the Bruges in
Belgium and the Southeastern

Historical Keyboard Competition in
Florida.C
But Brookshire doesn't spend all his
time in the practice room. As appren-
tice in a local harpsichord maker's
workshop, he has acquired a vast ex-
pertise in repairing, tuning, and main-
taining instruments. He is a dedicated
member of his profession; caring for
the instruments at the music school and
during his free hours, trouble-shooting
and making house calls for friends who
also own harpsichords.
But Brookshire's first love is perfor-
ming. His artistic personality is insight-
ful, innovative, passionate and at times
eccentric.
On hearing him play, one is firsto
awestruck by his technical wizardry,
and then thrilled at the originality of his
approach. Much of his ability to render
new and convincing interpretations
stems from the wide breadth of his
knowledge.
Brookshire is a complete musician.
He studies music history, music theory
and keyboard construction techniques,
delving into all aspects of each piece he

performs. Perhaps it is his dedication
which generates such a high level of in-
tensity when he steps onstage.
For Monday night, Brookshire has
prepared a program of fascinating
diversity. It will include music of the
Italian High Renaissance(Cento Partite
Sopra Passacaglia by Girelame
Frescobaldi )and some elegant French
Baroque music (Suite in D by Jean-
Henri D-Anglebert and Les Cyclopes by
Jean-Philippe Rameau).
Of course, no harpsichord recital
would be complete without J.S. Bach
and Brookshire has chosen his lively
Toccata in G major.
Framing the program will be four
sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti: Daring
openers because of their dangerous
virtuosity, appropriate closers because
of their grand bravura style.
Don't miss Brookshire, Monday night
at 8:30 in the Union Pendelton Room.

INDIVDUALTHEATRES
$2.00 SHOWS BEFORE 6:00 P.M.
"EFFERVESCENT"
NEW YORK TIMES
"EROTIC"
NEW YORK MAGAZINE
(R)OHMES
at the beach
SAT., SUN. 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:35
MON. 1:00, 7:15, 9:35
JACK NICHOLSON
DEBRA WINGER
SHIRLEY MacLAINE
&JS ~ (PG) ,.
SAT., SUN. 1:00, 3:30, 7:00, 9:25
MON. 1:00, 7:00, 9:25

Bradley Brookshire plays awe-inspiring harpsichord music Monday night in
the Union Pendelton Room.A

'A lice in

Wonderland'

SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) - Alice in Wonderland -
:onsidered one of the greatest nonsense tales in
iterature - was, in reality, Queen Victoria's secret
utobiography, a group of researchers has concluded
ifter 11 years of study.
"It perhaps will shock many to learn of my.
luplicity in having hidden behind Mr. Charles
)odgson and his pen name of "Lewis Carroll,"' says
lictoria in a contrived "confession" of the hoax just
>ublished by the Continental Historical Society.
The society's 241-page study called Queen Vic-
oria's Secret Diaries meticulously connects each in-
ident in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland to the
barly life of Victoria, who, as a girl, lived a very
ecluded life in a castle.
The Ugly Duchess, for example, is Victoria's
nother, the Duchess of Kent, who the princess hated.
he White Rabbit is the Duke of Kent, Victoria's
ather. The White Knight in Shining Armour is Prince
lbert, the Queen's husband whom she loved so
early.
David Rosenbaum, president of the Continental
istorical Society and chief editor of its book'
escribes the organization as an "ad hoc group of
riends who have been speculating about the author-
;hip of Alice since 1973 when an exchange of letters in
he London Times suggested Charles Dodgson was
not Lewis Carroll."
Rosenbaum's fellow researchers include Dr. John-
Raphael Staude, a former history instructor at the
University of California and other colleges; Charles

Ponce, a San Francisco psychotherapist and author;
John Norton, retired professor of English; and
Kathleen Charous, assistant curator of the Henry
Miller Memorial Library at Big Sur, Calif.
They have spent thousands of hours "deciphering"
Alice.
Queen Victoria is known to have kept extensive
diaries throughout her life. Some of them were
published and many were burned after her death.
Under the theory proposed by the Continental
Historical Society, the queen wanted to "have her
cake and eat it." She resented very much her
childhood and wanted to "get it off her chest." But,
since she was still reigning, she felt she had to do it in
a secret way, intending that a future age would
discover her story.
The new study alleges that Victoria bribed Dodgson
by allowing him to receive the royalties, from the
Alice book and its sequel Through the Looking Glass,
and also bribed Sir John Tenniel, whose remarkable
illustrations, the researchers say, are heavy with
hidden meanings about Victoria's life.
"Some of it may seem a little stretched," Rosen-
baum acknowledged. "However, when you take the
thing as a whole. When you put together a lot of things
that seem to fit together, all of them seem to add to a
coherent whole. If it were simple, people would have
figured it out long ago."
Not only has the society come up with an inter-
pretation for every single incident and allusion in the
story, but it has conducted a computer study that is
said to prove that Alice and Looking Glass are

is no arce
similar (they say identical) to Queen Victoria's
known writings and are unlike anything Dodgson had
written.
For example, in her childhood diaries the princess
frequently emphasized the word "very" by un-
derlining it. The computer analysis found that the
frequency of that underlining is the exact proportion
in which "very" is italicized in the Lewis Carroll
books.
The researchers also found that, while Dodgson
said he first told the stories to three little girls on a
"sunny afternoon" July 4, 1862, that date was ac-
tually an overcast and rainy day in the Oxford area.
In a typical passage from the book, Alice is
described as being in "a pool of tears which she had
wept when she was nine feet high." This is explained by
saying that Victoria was at the height of her career -
" 'nine feet high' so to speak" when her husband died,
and that shortly afterward she was weeping in pools
of tears.
Numerous satiric and symbolic meanings have
been read into the Alice books i the past, most recen-
tly a suggestion that the story is about the drug un-
derworld.
The new interpretation by the Continental
Historical Society is the first detailed effort to iden-
tify Queen Victoria as the author.
Dodgson himself said the stories were nonsense.
The researchers have a response for this, too. They
say Dodgson himself probably did not understand
that the queen was telling her own story in the book
she bribed him to publish.

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No

'Poland' in Poland

POETRY READ ING
with Charles Wasserburg
and Sandra Steintraber
READING FROM THEIR WORKS
Monday, February 6th
8:00 P.M.
GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE

LOS ANGELES (AP) - American
author James Michener's involvement
with Radio Free Europe has scotched
plans by Polish government officials to
have his epic Poland translated into
their language.
Michener was recently named to the
Board of International Broadcasting,
which oversees Radio Free Europe.
Soviet bloc countries consider the radio
network a tool of U.S. propaganda in-
tent on subverting communist gover-
nments in Eastern Europe.
"Because of Michener's appoin-
tment, it is quite clear we could not now
publish his book in Poland," an official

told the Los Angeles Times in yesterday's
editions. -
Poland traces the fortunes of three
families through nearly 800 years of
Polish history.
The offical also said that because of
Michener's involvement with Radio
Free Europe, plans were scrapped to
publish two of his other works in Polish,
Centennial and Space.
Michener told the Times that he was
aware his appointment in Washington
might cause some problems, but added,
"I think those are things that settle
out."

Michener
no Polish for 'Poland'

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