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January 31, 1984 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-01-31

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 31, 1984 - Page 7-

Snowstorm
clobbers Midwest,

(AP) - A snowstorm nearing bliz-
zard intensity produced "a winter
horror story" yesterday with up to a
foot of windblown snow across the
Midwest, blocking key interstate high-
ways and closing schools at it blustered
into the Northeast.
Winds gusting to 60 mph in places
flung snow at car windshields and
molded snowdrifts, often making
driving a one-lane crawl. School of-
ficials told children to stay home in
many cities, including Chicago, where
half a foot of snow had fallen by early
yesterday morning.
NORTHERN INDIANA reported the
heaviest accumulations of snow, with
up to 12 inches at Rensselaer. In neigh-
boring Illinois, 10 inches fell at Dixon
and 9 inches at Kanakee. Measuremen-
ts of 8 inches were common across
Minnesota, Illinois and Michigan. Iowa
got up to 7 inches and parts of Ohio had
6 inches on the ground by early mor-
ning.
New York City was warned to get
ready for up to half a foot of snow

during the night, with more possible in
the inland suburbs. Winter storm war-
nings also were posted in New England,
where up to 10 inches of show was ex-
pected in much of Connecticut and
Massachusetts and as much as a foot
was forecast for southern New Ham-
pshire and Maine.
In Indiana, a twin-engine turboprop
plane crashed shortly after takeoff
from Terre Haute, killing all three
aboard - two crewmen and an
executive of Britt Airways. A light mist
was falling at the time, after a snowfall
earlier in the night, but authorities did
not know immediately if the weather
was a factor in the crash.
"It's a winter horror story," said
state Illinois State Trooper Peter Negro
in Pontiac, Ill. "We're advising people
to stay at home."
The National Weather Service just
one day before Ground Hog Day issued
its forecasts for the month of February
projecting below-normal temperatures
for the entire country except for the
north-central states,

Mike Kinney, left, and Jack Jones playfully cross a creek in Columbus Ohio Sunday by using an ice jam for a bridge.
Several more inches of snow and ice fell on central Ohio yesterday during a snowstorm that swept the Midwest.
Blanchard signs retirement bill

I

LANSING, Mich. (UPI) - Gov. James
Blanchard yesterday signed into law
early retirement legislation he said
provides an "orderly" and "humane"
Way to achieve his administration's
goal of shrinking state government.
A key sponsor said he believes the
program may be unique among public
employers the size of Michigan, and
said the state will be "a pioneer."
4THE MEASURES permit state em-
ployees who are at least 50 years old
'U' facult
propose
Iresearch

and whose age and years of service
total 80 or more, to retire.
Retirees who have not reached 62 will
receive a monthly retirement allowan-
ce in addition to normal benefits.
the cost will be dovered by savings
realized by not filling vacant positions.
Under the law, no more than 25 percent
of those savings can go to replacing
departed workers. Blanchard noted his

administration projects a $60 million
savings from the legislation and expec-
ts it to trim the state payroll by about
1,500. Others expect upwards of 2,000 to
participate.
Blanchard signed the bills at a
ceremony attended by their sponsors,
state officials and some veteran civil
servants who plan to take advantage of
the program.

WE'LL PAY YOU'
SHAPE THIS
r

TO GET INTO
SUMMER.

INTRODUCING
THE NUVISION
COL.EGE SPECIAL.
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*Contact len, s r ces inciu(e eye
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Present this coupon at time of
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conference
(Continued from Page 1)
"This was an instance where people in
:science were doing work knowing
potential risks to humanity," Bassett
:said. "They themselves imposed a
restriction on their own work."
At SACUA's weekly meeting yester-
day, chairman Herbert Hildebrandt
told other committee members that he
inferred from a recent conversation
:with Steneck that "more homework has
to be done" on the proposed forum
before SACUA or the Senate Assembly
can consider action on Bassett's
proposal.

Light lunches: Any sandwich 12.85
with soup or all you can eat salad bar add 1.25
"All you Munchie
desire" Hour
Sunday 1.= 4-7 p.m.
Brunchs 2 for 1 i
14.95 f/ j drinks
Monday & Tuesday lunch special
Alyou desire salad bar u12.99
Bow ofsou 1150.up f sup 1.0

If you have at least
two years of college left,
you can spend six weeks at
our Army ROTC Basic
Camp this summer and earn
approximately $600.
And if you qualify, you
can enter the ROTC 2-
Year Program this fall and
receive up to $1,000 a year.
But the big payoff
happens on graduation day.
That's when you receive
an officers commission.
So get your body in
shape (not to mention your
bank Account).
Enroll in Army ROTC.
For more infort'ation,
contact your Professor of
Military Science.
ARMY ROTC.
BE ALLYOU CAN BE.
CONTACT
MAJ. JIM DENT
764-2400/2401
NORTH HALL

PK

I Pt
,I

4 _.

F*-

the chi

9
rerys

A division of FEDERATED DEPARTMENT STORES, Inc.

Z'

The C

The Children's Place Will Be Recruiting
At The University of Michigan on March 6th

.ompany:

Growth and Strength:

The Children's Place, which began as a single store in an entrepreneurial
venture 15 years ago, is today the nation's largest chain of specialty clothing
stores for children. Known in the retail industry as a progressive, dynamic
organization, The Children's Place is actively recruiting men and women
who can quickly prepare themselves to accept upper management
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Our standards are high, but so are the chances for rapid advancement. Right
now, The Children's Place has more than 110 stores in 19 states, and our
current strategy calls for 25 to 30 new stores each year.This corporate expansion
will create an immediate need for bright, aggressive, promotable executives.
What kind of men and women are we seeking for our executive development
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as a contemporary business executive.

*1

Standards:

Compensation:

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Starting salary levels are highly competitive, and the company has a salary review
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Benefits include employee discount, comprehensive medical/dental/life/vision
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Beginning February 6, 1984 students may sign up in the Career Planning and
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unable to see us when we are on campus, contact us directly by writing Ms. Debbie C.
Littleiohn. Personnel Director, at our Pine Brook, N.J. headquarters.

ii;

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