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January 31, 1984 - Image 6

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-01-31

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Page 6 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 31, 1984
Trade between
U.S. and Iran.

doutbles in
WASHINGTON (AP) - Trade bet- Thosec
ween the United States and Iran, recen- tly when
tly condemned by the Reagan ad- propriate
ministration as a sponsor of terrorism, later se
topped $1 billion in 1983, at least double Tehran.]
the previous year. posed r
But two-way trade is still less than trade er
one-fifth of the level in 1978, the year 1981 as p
before the Islamic revolution replaced the Ame
the Shah or Iran with Ayatollah
Rubollah Khomeini. Most of the trade EVEN
involves U.S. oil purchases on the spot countries
market, and thus is not direct between Commer
the two nations. u keep figi
BEFORE THE revolution, the United Since t
States shipped arms and machinery to swing, an
the shah's government while Iranian underest
tankers loaded with oil, caviar and in- many ofI
tricate rugs arrived on American throught
shores. "Ther
In 1978, trade soared to $6.6 billion, doesn't s
with the United States selling Iran $3.7 Kathleen
billion worth of goods, more than to any the Com
other nation outside Western Europe exampl
and Japan. machine

1983

commercail ties ended abrup-
Khomeini came to power, ex-
ed American companies and
eized the U.S. embassy- in
Former President Carter im-
estrictions on trade, but the
mbargo was lifted in January
part of an agreement releasing'
rican hostages.
SO, trade between the two
s was so low in 1981 that the
'ce Department didn't bother to
ures,
hen, there's been a modest up-
rd officials say the figures may
imate the actual trade because
the dealing are probably done
third parties.
e may be more trade, but it
show up in the statistics," said
n Keim, a specialist on Iran at
rmerce Department. If, for
e, a U.S. company sold
ery to a broker in West Ger-
Rho in turn sold it to Iran, the
ransaction would be recorded
the United States and West
y.

Police,
notes
Men demand money
Two men armed with handguns for-
ced their way into an apartment on the
1800 block of W. Stadium Friday at -7
a.m. The men, both in their mid-
thirties, demanded money and drugs
and locked the apartment residents into
a bathroom before leaving. The men
escaped empty-handed, and no one was
injured.
Armed robbery com-
mitted
Four males committed an armed
robbery at the Quik-Pik Store at 1818 S.
Industrial Saturday at 2:20 a.m., taking
a large quantity of beer and a small
amount of cash. Three of the males
went to the back of the store, while the
fourth suspect pulled a knife on the
store clerk. Shortly after, the four men,
all in their twenties;fled the scene.
County Seat burglarized
Five pairs of blue jeans and ten
wallets were stolen from the County
Seat at Briarwood Mall Sunday. A steel
mesh screen covering the entrance to
the store was forced open between 11:30
p.m. January 28 and 6:45 p.m. Monday,
Less than $300 of merchandise was
stolen. Police have no suspects at this
time.
Jeep stolen
A 1979 Jeep CJ7 was stolen from the
700 block of E. University between 12:30
a m. and 2:30 a.m. Sunday.
Knife pulled on -
Pantree customer
A patron eating at the Pantree
restaurant at 330 E. Liberty was con-
fronted by a suspect who pulled out a
knife and demanded money from the
customer. The incident occurred at 11
p.m. Sunday, and attracted a crowd of
on-lookers. The suspect, who was
described as being in the late teens, fled
the scene with no money.
-Nancy Gottesman

AP Photo'
Two faced
Makeup artist Rigo Ortega adds a new face to an unidentified model at the 41st Annual Long Beach Hairdressers' Guild:
Beauty and trade Show over the wekend in Long Beach, Ca. Scissors snipped and locks were lopped as contests were ,
held in such categories as hair stylings, sculptured nails and fantasy makeup.

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Republca
(Continued from Page 1)
choose points to a Ronald Reagan per-
formance that deserves re-election."
WITH U.S. Senate candidate Jack
Lousma at his side, Abraham told the 80
students who filled the classroom that
recent reductions in interest rates, in-
flation and unemployment show that
the president's economic policies have
taken effect.

FREE UNIVERSITY COURSES AND WORKSHOPS NOW OPEN
Six weeks of free courses and workshops on social change
FREE UNIVERSITY COURSES AND WORKSHOPS 4 all are about some aspect of social change for human liberation +
courses meet once a week, for up to two hours, for six weeks + workshops meet once or twice, during the weekend
* involve minimal readings or outside work + begin in the week of Feb. 5.
ALL FREE UNIVERSITY COURSES AND WORKSHOPS ARE + open to all U-M students as well as others interested + offered free
of charge + participatory in style-free from grades, credits and other restrictions + sponsored by the Michigan Student As-
sembly, LSA Student Government and Canterbury Loft.
TO SIGN UP + COME TO THE FIRST MEETING AT THE PLACE LISTED BELOW + THE FIRST MEETING OF A COURSE IS INFORMA-
TIONAL + PEOPLE FORMALLY JOIN THE COURSE BY COMING TO THE SECOND MEETING.
FOR MORE INFORMATION + about specific courses and workshops, call the resource person at the number indi-
cated. About the Free University generally, call 763-3251. Here are the courses offered this Winter:

cs seek stud
He urged students to join the Reagan
campaign and the effort to elect
Republicans to other national and state
offices, saying "This is an open party
right now," he said. "You simply will
not find a more opportune moment to
get involved in politics." Abraham said
he is the youngest party chairman in
the nation, and he said 1984 is a perfect
opportunity for students to join the new
generation of state party leaders.
The 31-year-old arty leader said you
ng people are taking over many impor-
tant positions in the party now and will
find it easer to move up in the ranks.
LOUSMA ECHOED the importance
Ann Arbor
Contact Lens Clinic
A Full Contact Lens Service
FEBRUARY SPECIAL
EXTENDED WEAR LENSES
$325
DR. PAUL C. USLAN
545 Church Street " Ann Arbor
769-1222

tent support
of student involvement, saying he will
need student support to defeat former
congressman Jim Dunn in the August
primary and tackle incumbent
Democratic Sen. .Carl Levin in Novem-
ber.
Apparently responding to Dunn's
charges that Lousma is not familiar
with Michigan and its problems, the
retired astronaut said he was not
alienated from the news during his 25
years of military service. "I have not
been out of touch with American society
all these years," he said. "I have been a
very involved and informed citizen.
WHile the Republican students met,
the College Democrats assembled to
discuss their own strategies. "The key
to beating Ronald Reagan on campus is
to get students registered," said
organizer Andrew Hartman. He said
the Democrats will focus on voter
registration and telling students how to
vote in the complex March 17 state
caucus.
College Republicans' chairman Gret-
chen Morris, however, said students
will vote for Reagan because he has
reduced the unemployment rate. "I
think all students...want jobs when we
get out," she said.

Read

and

SUNDAY
Media and Politics
This class will explore the political nature of news reportage,
working towards examining what the agenda for the "new"
media should be.
Resource People: Mike Kopka-General Manager WCBN
763-3501 (Afternoons)
Sally Horvath-Associate Editor-Michigan Voice
John Beckett-Reporter-Ann Arbor News
First Meeting: Sunday, February 5, 1984, 4:00-6:00 PM,
(6 week class)
Canterbury Loft, 332 S. State St. (Above Bivouac)
WORKSHOPS: Meet only dates listed
Songs for the 80's: A Political Music Workshop
Resource Person and Lead Guitar: Hugh McGuiness
761-5648
Meets Sunday, February 5and March 4, 1984
1:30 PM at Canterbury Loft, 332 S. State St.
(Above Bivouac)
Tuition and the University Budget: Where Does
All My Money Go
Resource Person: Tom Marx-MSA Budget Researcher
763-3241
Meets Sunday, February 12, 1984 2:00-4:00 PM
Anderson Room, Michigan Union-First Floor
The Subversion of the War Powers Act.
Resource Person: Rich Ahern 665-9358 (2 PM-Midnight)
Meets Sunday, March 11, 1984 2:00-5:00 or 6:00 PM
336%/ S. State St. (3rd Floor above Music Mart)
MONDAY
Co-ops: Working Towards Economic Democracy
A survey of Cooperatives in Ann Arbor and how they help
people stretch their scarce dollars.
Resource People: Luther H. Buchele or Gigi Bosch 662-4414
First Meeting: Monday, February 6, 1984 4:00-6:00 PM
(6 week class)
Michigan Union, 4th Floor Lobby
Tenants' Rights and Tenant Organizing
This class will explore tenant rights in Ann Arbor and then
examine using the collective power of tenants to gain in-
creased rights.
Resource Person: Dale Ewart, Director of Ann Arbor
Tenants' Union, 763-6876
First Meeting: Monday, February 6, 1984 8:00-10:00 PM
(6 week class)
Canterbury Loft, 332 S. State St. (Above Bivouac)
TUESDAY
The Politics of Nuclear Disarmament
This class will examine the issues surrounding disarmament
and the possibilities and prospects for change, including how
the individual can get involved locally. Similar to a course of-
fered last Fall by the Michigan Alliance for Disarmament
(MAD).
Resource People: Justin Schwartz and
other members of MAP 995-5871
First Meeting: Tuesday, February 7, 1984 7:30-9:30PM
(6 week class)
Room 24-26-East Quad-basement
Exploring the Gender Gap
We will explore personal definitions of feminism, what the
differences are, and how the differences affect relationships
between men and women. The class will meet as a mixed
sex group and then as single sex groups on alternating
weeks.
. Resource People: Amy Nusbaum 995-0461
Jeff Meckler 996-5970
Nancy Aronoff 995-0700
First Meeting: Tuesday, February 7, 1984 7:00-9:00 PM
(6 week class)
Canterbury Loft, 332 S. State St. (Above Bivouac)
WEDNESDAY
Capitalism, Democracy and World Peace
We will investigate the reasons for the democratic form of
power, the consciousness and behaviors of those subject to
this violence, and the forceful extension of this power over
the world. Facilitated by members of the Marxist Group.
Resource People: Peter Ochshorn 996-0175
Mie Foleav 769-8599

WEDNESDAY (Continued) ,
Local Politics and City Elections
Members of the Democratic Caucus will present information
and facilitate discussion related to current city ballot pro-
posals and city council campaigns. Help discuss strategies
and put them in action.
Resource Person: Larry Hunter 668-6165
First Meeting: Wednesdayfebruary 8, 1984 7:30-9:30 PM
(6 week class)
Canterbury Loft, 332 S. State St. (Above Bivouac)
Central American Survey-Background and
Current Events
Confused about recent events in Central America? This
course will provide information through guest lectures and
informal discussion. No prior knowledge necessary.
Resource People: Judith Allen 663-0143
Donna Rich 996-5962
First Meeting: Wednesday, February 8, 1984 7:30-9:30 PM
(6 week class)
Room 28-East Quad-basement
THURSDAY
Black Students at UM: The Struggle Continues
The Black Student Union is facilitating this course to dis-
cuss organizing strategies and ways of implementing them.
For those who want to take positive steps towards change.
Resource Person: Salene Hitchcock 763-3241 (Days)
First Meeting: Thursday, February 9, 1984 7:00-9:00 PM
(6 week class).
Trotter House, 1443 Washtenow
(between S. University and Hill)
Social Change Communes
This class will examine theoretical and practical aspects of
forming social change communities, as well as examine ex-
isting social change- sommunities. Come ready to discuss
your ideas.
Resource Person: David Miklethun 994-5074
First Meeting: Thursday, February 9, 1984 7:00-9:00 PM
(6 week class)
MSA Chambers, 3909 Michigan Union (Third Floor)
Partners With the, Pentagon:
Military Research at the University
Members of the Progressive Student Network will conduct
a forum at six of the dorms to inform and lead discussion on
the implications of military research and what can be done
about it.
Resource People: Chris Hill 763-3241 (Days)
Tom Marx
Meetings are 8:00-10:00 PM, Thursday,
February 9, 1984-East Quad
February 16, 1984-West Quad
March 1, 1984-South Quad
March 8, 1984-Bursley
March 15, 1984-Markley
March 22, 1984-Alice Lloyd
(Rooms to be announced-ask Front Desks)
SATURDAY
Political Theater improvisation Class
An exploration of theater and its relationship to politics,
consisting of a series of participatory exercises using im-
provisational techniques. No theatrical experience neces-
sary.
Resource Person: David Duboff 995-2524 (Evenings)
First Meeting: Saturday, February 11, 1984 2:00-4:00 PM
(6 week class)
Canterbury Loft, 332 S. State St. (Above Bivouac)
WORKSHOPS: Meet only dates listed
1984 and Nineteen Eighty-Four: Living the
Orwellian Nightmare
Resource Person :Winston Smith 763-3241 (Days)
Meets Saturday, February 11 and February 18, 1984
4:00-6:00 PM
Canterbury Loft, 332 S. State St. (Above Bivouac)
Conscientious Objection to the Payment of War Taxes
Resource Person: Fran Eliot 663-2655
Meets Saturday, February 18 and March 17, 1984
Noon-4:00 PM (brown bag)
Wesley Lounge, 602 E. Huron (corner of State)
Student Empowerment:

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