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January 19, 1984 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-01-19

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Page 2 - The Michigon Daily - Thursday, January 19, 1984
Love Boat 'roducer
cruises to Ann Arbor

By SHARON SILBAR
Sun-tanned and conservatively dress-
ed -at least by Hollywood standards -
former University student Henry
Coleman says his job is to satify the
public's "void of happiness."
Every Saturday night millions of
American's glue their eyes to a TV set
and let Coleman do his stuff.
"WE SELL glamorous women in
bikinis and evening gowns, gorgeous
food, and luxurious travel," said
Coleman, producer of the TV series
"The Love Boat."
"It's an enticing kind of thing. Total
fantasy," he told a group of 25 in Lane
Hall yesterday.
Although producing "The Love Boat"
is hardly the kind of job one would ex-
pect a former engineering student to
have, Coleman relishes his position.
The hour-long show on ABC features
a different group of top Hollywood stars
each week who cruise the western coast
of Mexico on the fictional "Love Boat"
usually to find true love or comical
oNdiance.
Most of the show is actually filmed on
a cruise ship, he said. During the seven
years Coleman has produced the show
he has sailed to Australia, Greece, the
Fiji Islands, Monaco, and Japan.
"What could be boring with a job like
that?" he said.
--Actors and actresses appearing on

the show also enjoy the travel benefits
and most stars earn a hefty salary
which can exceed $15,000 an episode.
The show's regulars earn even higher
salaries. Gavin MacLeod, who plays
Captain Steubing, is the show's top-paid
actor earning $60,000 per episode.
Coleman added that MacLeod is just as
pice inperson as he appears to be on the
show.
BUT COLEMAN, who has also
worked on television classics such as
"Dobie Gillis," "Peyton Place," and
"Love American Style," warned the
audience at a forum sponsored by the
communication department that the
downfall -of workers in Hollywood is
,that "you lose perspective on who your
are, what you are, and what you're wor-
th."
One person who lost perspective, ac-
cording to Coleman, was the show's
leading female star, Lauren Tewes,
who played cruise director, Julie Mc-
Coy.
At the start of last season, which
featured an unprecedented location
filming in China, Tewes' new agents
asked for $25,000 more per show.
Tewes' salary per episode was already
$42,500 and management refused her
request. Tewes eventually left the
show.
"I personally felt a sadness, because
we are, after seven years, a family."

Daily Photo by DOUG MCMAHON
Former University student Henry Coleman, now producer of the popular
television show The Love Boat, says at Lane Hall yesterday his program
fulfills Americans' need for fantasy.

Blanchard reveals plan to increase educational aid

<Continued from Page 1)
inereases; much less making up for the
backlog in equipment purchases and
phAnt maintenance."
EARLIER this week, James
crinkerhoffnUniversity vicespresident
Ond chief financial officer, said if the
proposal for freezing tuition is limited
to- in-state undergraduates, it is
possible the University would increase
tuition for out-of-state students and
graduate students.
Robert Sauve, assistant to the vice
president for academic affairs and one
of the designers of the University's
budget, said he was "hoping Blanchard
would be more specific" on the details

'That amount of incremental money would
not be sufficient to meet our costs, so what
appears generous, in fact, is not.'
- Billy Frye
University vice president

Along with higher edcucation, Blan'
chard emphasized increased support
for elementary and secondary
education, computer literacy for all
Michigan schoolchildren, and the
economic recovery of the state in the
wake of the income tax increases. He
told the people of Michigan that "we
saved ourselves" with the controversial
tax hike.
Calling 1984-85 the "year of the zero
budget," Blanchard vowed to not in-
crease spending in the coming year.
The budget detailing the proposals an-
nounced in yesterday's speech will be
announced early next week.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Islamic gunmen kill American
president of Beirut university
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Gunmen firing silencer-equipped pistols killed the
president of the American University outside his office yesterday and
Moslem extremists said he was a victim 'of "the American presence in
Lebanon."
The Islamic Jihad group claimed responsibility for the killing of Malcolm
Kerr, who refused a bodyguard after becoming head of the school, and also
threatened to kill a Saudi Arabian diplomat kidnapped Tuesday in Beirut.
"Kerr was the victim of the American presence in Lebanon," said a caller
identifying himself as a member of the Islamic Jihad - the Holy War.
Kerr, 52, an American who was an expert on the Middle East, was shot by
two gunmen using silencer-equipped pistols. He was declared dead on
arrival at the American University Hospital, the same hospital where he
was born.
Police and Army units - aided at one exit by U.S. Marines assigned to the
adjacent U.S. Embassy - sealed off the walled and guarded 73-acre campus
to search for suspects but the gunmen escaped.
Gromyko attacks U.S. policies
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Groriyko
delivered a blistering attack on U.S. policies yesterday, but in a private
meeting later he and Secretary of State George Shultz appeared to make
headway toward better relations.
It was the first high-level contact between the superpowers since U.S.-
Soviet arms talks broke off last November. U.S. officials said "the
discussion was a good one" and progress was made over a broad range of
unspecified issues.
There was no announcement of a follow-up sesson but a U.S.. official, who
briefed reporters on condition he not be identified, said "future contacts were
addressed." He declined to elaborate.
In his address to the 35-nation. European Disarmament Conference,
Gromyko accused the United States of making "maniacal plans" for nuclear
war. He said, "New missiles, bombers and aircraft carriers are being chur-
ned out in some kind of pathological obsession."
Asked about Gromkyo's address, the U.S. official said Shultz "recognized
it was a speech, but he took his normal, constructive attitude toward doing
business with a foreign minister."
Fire rages in Japanese mine
TOKYO - Fire broke out in Japan's largest coal mine more than 700 feet
beneath the ocean floor and the death toll stood at 58 today, with the number
expected to climb.
Mining officials said 26 miners remained trapped in an undersea pit filled
with smoke and poisonous carbon monoxide resulting from the blaze yester-
day at the Miike Mine off the island of Kyushu.
Police said they had confirmed 29 dead, 38 injured and 28 still in the mine,
but acknowledged that many classified as "injured" probably had lost their
lives.
Mining officials said 707 miners were below ground - nearly two miles
from the shaft entrance - when the fire started. They said more than 600
escaped through three exits, but the rest did not make it to the surface.
Education Secretary criticizes
learning programs in schools
WASHINGTON - Education Secretary T.H. Bell criticized computer
learning programs in schools as "electronic page-turning," and said yester-
day he will finance research on new ways to teach children algebra and how
to write.
Bell said computers, if used properly, can serve as "a slave mechanism"
to relieve English teachers of burdensome tasks and to help keep students
with average IQ's from "bombing out" on algebra.
The education secretary said some high school English teachers have the
"horrendous burden" of trying to teach 150 pupils a day, and it is "sort of
self-inflicted punishment" to give a writing assignment.
Much of the hard work of checking for grammar, spelling, punctuation and
structure "could be done by the computer as a slave mechanism," leaving
the teacher free to critique style and content, he said.
Bell, who has played a pivotal role in stirring the national debate about
raising school standards, said he expects unions to keep fightingstate efforts
to adopt performance-based pay for teachers.
High court opens jury selections
WASHINGTON - The public and news reporters have a constitutional
right to attend jury selection proceedings in criminal trials, the Supreme-
Court ruled unanimously yesterday.
The court said trial judges may conduct secret jury selection only as a last
resort, and only after listing specific reasons why such steps are necessary.
"The presumption of openness may be overcome only by an overriding
interest based on findings that closure is essential," Chief Justice Warren

Burger wrote for the court.
And when such closures take place, the court said, transcripts of the
proceedings most often should be made public "within a reasonable time."
The decision set' aside rulings that have allowed California courts
routinely to conduct secret jury selections in capital murder cases. The
decision also extended a landmark 1980 Supreme Court ruling that public
and press have a right to attend criminal trials even when defendants object.

4

4

{

4

I

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of the merit scholarship plan.
"Any money to be given to students is
good," Sauve said. "But in this case you
don't know how it will be implemen-
ted."

SAUVE SAID the governor was not
clear on whether these grants would be
based totally on academic merit or if
financial need would also be con-
sidered.

-.I

Lie CntWle

, I

4

14

4

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cTle lI ictigai 1ati
Thursday, January 19, 1984
Vol. XCIV-No. 90
(ISSN 0745-967X)
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Anti Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $15.50 September through April (2 semesters); $19.50 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day mornings. Subscription rates: $8 in Ann Arbor; $10 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syn-
dicate and Field Enterprises Newspaper Syndicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY; Sports desk, 763-0376; Circulation,
764-0558; Classified Advertising, 764-0557; Display Advertising, 764-0554;
Billing, 764-0550. Tom Ehr, Joe Ewing, Chris Gerbasi, Jeff Harrison, Pau
Editor-in-chief... ............. ...BARRY WITT Helgren. Steve Hunter. TornKeaney. Ted Lerner. Doug
Managing Editor............... . ... JANET RAE Levy. Tim Makinen, Adorn Martin. Mike McGraw.
News Editor......................GEORGE ADAMS Scott McKinley.Barb McQuade, Liso Nolen, Phil
Student Affairs Editor .................. BETH ALLEN Nussell, Rob Pollard. Mike Redstone. Scott Salawich .
Opinion Page EditorsN.............. DAVID SPAK Paula Schipper, Randy Schwartz, Rich Weidis, Steve
BILL SPINDLE Wise. Andrea Wolf.
Arts/Magazine Editors..............MARE HODGESi Business Manager SAMG. SLAUGHTER IV
SUSAN MAKUCH Sales Manager ...'....... MEG GIBSON
Associate Arts Editor ........... JAMES BOYD Operations Manager LAURIE ICZKOVITZ
Sports Editor........................... JOHN KERR Classified Manager .. PAM GILLERY
Associate Sports Editors ............JIM DWORMAN Display Manager .JEFF VOIGT
LARRY FREED Finance Manager JOE TRULIK
CHUCK JAFFE Nationals Manager RON WEINER
LARRY MISHKIN Co-op Manager .. DENA SHEVZOFF
RON POLLACK Assistant Display Manager NANCY GUSSIN
Chief Photographer ................DEBORAH LEWIS Assistant Classified Manager LINDA KAFTAN
NEWS STAFF: Marian Abernathy, Cheryl Boocke, Assistant Sales Manager . JULIE SCHINEIDER
Sue Barto, Neil Chase, Laurie Delater, Andrew Assistant Operations Manager ., STACEY FALLEK
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