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November 16, 1983 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
Cellist Mstislav Rostropovich will play selections from Beethoven,
Schumann, and Britten tonight at 8:30 p.m., in a concert sponsored by the
University Musical Society at Hill Auditorium.
Films
Cinema II - Ball of Fire, 7 p.m., His Girl Friday, 8 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Hill St. - On the Town, .7 & 9 p.m., 1429 Hill.
Cinema Guild - The Stranger, 7 & 9 p.m., Lorch.
AAFC - Aguirre, Wrath of God, 7:30 p.m., Distant Thunder, 9:15 p.m.,
MLB3.
Performances
School of Music - Trombone recital, Lawrence Cooper, 8 p.m., Recital
Hall.
Theatre and Drama - "Devour the Snow" by Abe Polsky, 8 p.m., New
Trueblood Arena, Frieze Building.
Ark - Open mike night, 7:30, 1421 Hill.
Second Chance - Masquerade.
Laugh Track - Comedy triple header, Stoney Burke, Tim Slagle, Tim
Rowlands, 9 p.m., U-Club.
Speakers
Guild House; Canterbury Loft - Christianity and Capitalism Today,
Cornel West, "The Prophetic Church & the Socialist Vision," 7:30 p.m., Rec
Room, St. Andrew's Church.
Ind. & Oper. Engin. - Seminar, A.K. Kochhar, "Computer Integrated
Manufacturing and Its Implications," 4 p.m., IOE Sem. Rm. 241.
PsychiatryB- Thomas Wehr, "Seasonal Depressions - Rhythms &
Blues," 10:30 a.m., CRH Aud.
Western European Studies; Economics; Sociology - Ernest Mandel,
"Contemporary Debates in Marxist Theory," 4 p.m., Rackham Am-
phitheater.
Dentistry - Oral biology seminar, Salam Syed, "Comparative
Microbiology of Periodontal Disease," 4 p.m., 1033 Kellogg.
Michigan Map Society - James Minton, "Modern Maps & their Research
Possibilities," 8 p.m., Grad Library, Rm. 825.
Jewish Social Action Committee - Zvi Gitelman, "Soviet Jews Today,"
7:30 p.m., Hillel, 1429 Hill.
Michigan College Republicans - Mike Nye, "Duties of a State Rep," 7
p.m., Anderson Rm., Union..
Chemistry - Analytical seminar, David Albers, "Fluoro-Immunoassay,"
4 p.m., 1200 Chem; organic seminar, Steven Tanis, "Furans as Synthons in
the Preparation of Bioactive Natural Products," 4 p.m., 1300 Chem.
New England Lit Program - Informational meeting and slide show for
spring term in New Hampshire, 8 p.m., Angell Aud. D.
Computing Center - Forrest Hartman, "Intro to TELL-A-GRAFF," 3:30
p.m., 165 Bus. Ad.
Sociology - Thomas Scheff, "Research on Emotions," 4 p.m., Rackham
E. Conf. Rm.
Minority Student Services, Trotter House - Neftali Garcia, "Economic
and Ecological Crisis in Puerto Rico; A Case in Utilization & Abuse of
Natural Resources," 7:30 p.m., Rackham W Conf. Rm.
English - Young writers series, poet Ian Reid, 4 p.m., Rackham W. Conf.
Rm.
Project Community - Panel discussion, "Career Options in Law," 4:30
p.m., Rm.116,Hutchens Hall.
International Center - Slide show, Year in Scandinavia Program, noon,
International Center;
Physics and Humanities - Brian Josephson, "Intelligence and Reality," 4
p.m., 170 Astronomy Bldg.
Center for Afroamerican and African Studies; Office of Ethicsand
I ,e1igion-,Cornel West, "Tie 196W's and Afro-America: A Black Christian
Socialist Perspective," noon, Rm.1309 School of Education..
Center for Russian and East European Studies - Bill Zimmerman, "A
Report on the Soviet Interview Project," noon, Lane Hall Commons Rm.
Marxist Humanist News and Letters Committee - Eyewitness reports by
lab sit-in and Nov. 12 march on Washington participants, 8 p.m., East Quad
Rm. 124.
Meetings
Michigan Gay Undergraduates - 9 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Tae Kwon Do Club - Practice, 7 p.m., CCRB Martial Arts Rm.
Academic Alcoholics -1:30 p.m., Alano Club.
Science Fiction Club - 8:15 p.m., League.
Miscellaneous
Museum of Art - Art Break, Jeanette Goldberg, "Woodcuts," 12:10 p.m.
Student Alumni Council - First & Foremost Week, Maize & Blue
"Tackey" Dress Contest & Cheering Contest, 7 p.m., Dooley's.
Student Wood and Crafts Shop - Power Tools Safety, 6 p.m., 537 SAB.
CEW - Math Review, 7:30 p.m., MLB.
Friends of UM Hospitals - Holiday Bell Bazaar, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., private
dining rooms adjoining the main.cafeteria; bake sale, 7:30 a.m., fifth floor

elevator lobby.M
Undergraduate English Association - Poetry reading, bring your own
poems, 6 p.m., Rm. 124 East Quad.
Transcendental Meditation - Intro to TM program, 8 p.m., 528 W. Liberty.
WCBN - Women's Rites and Rhythms, 6 p.m., Black Affairs Show, 6:30
p.m., 88.3 FM.
Red Cross - Blpood drive, 11 a.m.,to 4:30 p.m., Union.
Breakthrough - Dramatically Able, drama workshop for able and
disabled persons, 4:30 p.m., Rm. C, League.
University of Michigan Straight Shooters - Straight Shooters Turkey
Shoot, 10 a.m. -7 p.m., indoor range, top floor of North University Building.
Opryland - Talent search, 1-4 p.m., Union Assembly Hall.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109
alicious Intent
° ' r

Panel tofight black

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 16, 1983 -Page 3
enrollmnt drop

By GEORGEA KOVANIS
Presidents of the University's dormitory minority
councils have banded together to fight declining
minority enrollment by helping with recruitment and
retention programs and lobbying for increased finan-
cial aid.
According to Douglas Middlebrooks, chairman of
the newly-formed Minority President's Council, the
coalition was created earlier this week to improve
communication between minority groups on campus.
"WE WANT TO make a plan to increase the num-
ber of minorities and keep them here," said Mid-

dlebrooks, who is president of the Markley Minority
Council.
Middlebrooks said the coalition was formed par-
tially as a response to figures released recently which
show that black enrollment at the University is at 4.9
percent - a two percent drop since 1977.
He said the council, by staging its own programs to
encourage new minority students, can help relieve
some of the pressure forced on minority faculty
members.
"THE PROBLEM of minority recruitment and

retention seems to be left on minority faculty," he
said.
"We'll be working, hopefully, with some area of
admissions, and some area of housing," said Mosher-
Jordan Minority Council President Vickie Davis.She
said the coalition will publicize the resources
available to minority students.
Middlebrooks said part of the problem could be.
solved by increasing financial aid for minority :#
students to match the levels at other schools.
"Michigan can compete," he said. "We just have
to get off our duffs and do it."

Ronald
McDonald
shelter
to open in
Ann Arbor
By REBECCA KNOX
Parents coming to Ann Arbor to be
with their seriously ill children while
they receive medical treatment will no
longer have to pay a fortune to stay
near the hospital.
A "Ronald McDonald House," one of
a national network of temporary
homes for families of hospitalized
children, is scheduled to open in Ann
Arbor in late summer of next year. The
shelter is the second such facility to be
located in Michigan.
ALTHOUGH BACKERS of the fund-
raising drive are currently negotiating
for several sites, no specific location
has been selected yet. The facility
which planners hope will include as
many as 20 bedrooms, will probably be
located near Mott's Children's
Hospital, they said.
Memebers of the Ann Arbor Junior
Service League are coordinating the
drive to raise $1.2 million to cover start-
up costs for the house. According to
League President Gretchen Wieting-
Sherwood, who will serve as president
of Arbor House, Inc., owners and
operators of McDonald's restaurants
throughout Michigan have already
pledged $350,000 to the project. The
McDonald's Corp. has donated $25,000.
Once the facility is established,
Wieting-Sherwood said area parents,
business and community leaders, and
hospital representatives will help main-
tain it.
ANN ARBOR was selected as a
Ronald McDonald House location
because of the quality of the medical
services available in the area.
"We had so much need up against
other areas," Wieting-Sherwood said.
She estimated that as many as 3,000
children are brought to the city each
year for treatment.
Mary Griffith, one of the members of
the board of directors, said she decided
to help create the Ann Arbor facility
because of her personal experiences
with caring for a sick child.
GRIFFITH's FAMILY stayed in a
Ronald McDonald House in
Philadelphia for four months while 13-
year-old Jennifer received treatment
for leukemia. The room cost the family
$5 a night, which allowed them to stay
in the city until the girl's treatment was
complete.
"You think that you're the only one it
(having a sick child) could happen to,"
Griffith said. "In a Ronald McDonald
House, the parents stick together and
help each other. It's not just lodging.
It's emotional support."
Griffith, who lives in Ohio, offered
her services to the Ann Arbor house
because of what she saw at Mott's while
Jennifer was receiving treatment
there.
"Parents were sleeping in the halls,
anywhere they could find to sleep," she
said. "Cheap lodging was something
they just didn't have."
Griffith is writing a book on her ex-
perience, which she plans to call Road
in the Dark. She says the house is
"something close to her heart."
[(SHOP NOW

FOR A CHRISTMAS
GIFT THAT WON'T
BE DUPLICATED
Giant
Selection
PFD-

Flashglance Dpily Photo by DOUG McMAHON
Only the photographer's lens can capture such a unique version of last night's snowy weather. But Reggie Harvey, a
senior in the music school, probably wasn't thinking about creativity as he hovers underneath his umbrella outside,
Burton Tower.

GEO vote end; U'
finds new members

(Continued from Page 1)
student assistants membership status.
Union dues typically are paid through
deductions in payroll checks after' a
teaching or staff assistant returns a
card authorizing such payment.
Gamble said that most of the errors
occurred with new employees who tur-
ned in a deduction card for the first
time. Gamble also attributed the
problem to the uniqueness of the GEO
deduction system, which differs from
other union's systems. The system
"really hasn't had a lot of experience,"
Gamble said. But "we're going to take
steps to ensure that this doesn't happen
again," he said.
Gene Goldenfeld, GEO's elections
committee coordinator, charged that
the union lost more than 100 members
because of both the confusion over the
membership list and a confusing letter
the University sent to teaching and
staff assistants to explain the deduction
system.
BECAUSE GEO is an agency shop,
all teaching and staff assistants must
either join the Union of pay a represen-
tation service fee to GEO. Only mem-
bers are allowed to vote on the proposed
contract.
To ratify the agreement, 50 percent
plus one of the union's current mem-
bership must vote in favor of it. GEO's
membership, including the names just
cleared up, is now estimated at about
650, not 776, as stated in yesterday's
Daily. The union represents about 1,700
teaching and staff assistants at the
University.

GEO reached the tentative contract
agreement with the University in Sep-
tember. If it is approved, it will be the
first contract between the union and the
University since 1975.

i

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Earn 8 Credits This Spring
in NEW HAMPSHIRE
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LITERATURE PROGRAM,

MASS MEETING & SLIDE SHOW
WED., NOV. 16,
8 p.m.
AUDITORIUM D ANGELL HALL

for more information
PROF. WALTER CLARK
Dept. of English
761-9579

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