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November 13, 1983 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-11-13

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page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Sunday, November 13, 1983

s I See It
By LARRYMISHKIN
Gopher football . . .
... a fumbled effort
MINNEAPOLIS
F OLLOWING MICHIGAN'S gut-wrenching, 16-6 loss
to Illinois two weeks ago, I made the astute obser-
vation that not many things could be worse.
I was wrong.
The statement should now read, there is nothing worse
than being a Minnesota Gophers football fan.
All of us isolated souls in Ann Arbor think that a good
football season is when the Wolverines don't lose more
than two games: If they lose three games, the grumbling
begins and after the fourth loss, Michigan fans stop iden-
tifying with their team. If, Fielding H. Yost forbid, the
Wolverines would ever lose five games in a season,
Michigan fans would surely join their Ohio State coun-
terparts in an all-out boycott of a certain pizza chain of
which Bo Schembechler is a member of the board of
directors.
Try to imagine not only losing nine or 10 games in a
season, but losing games by such lopsided scores as 84-
12, 69-18 and 56-17. Hell, the Gophers even lost to North-
western for the second year in a row, thus earning them
a distinction as the Big Ten's new patsy.
Wolverine fans break out into a cold sweat at the mere
mention of even tying Northwestern. The effects of a loss
to the Wildcats would be too devastating to think about.
Things weren't always this bad for Minnesota. Just
five years ago Smokey Joe Salem took over the coaching
reigns of a Gopher squad that appeared to be on the
brink of conference respectability.
'Gone to pot'
As recently as two years ago, Minnesota finished with
a plus-.500 record, 6-5, had the rifle-armed Mike Hohen-
see at quarterback and had become a team to be
reckoned with.
Last year, however, the slide began. The Gophers
started losing, Hohensee got hurt and the Gophers lost
some more, finishing the season with a 3-8 mark and
only one conference victory. Their loss to Northwestern
marked the Wildcat's first Big Ten victory in over three
years.
This year, the slide turned into an avalanche for Min-
nesota. Following their season-opening victory over
Rice, the Gophers have lost and lost and lost, and not
only in games.Salem has lost19 players who were expec-
ted to contribute to the team, including team captain and
starting center Randy Rasmussen, tight end Jay Carroll
and most of the offensive backfield. As a result, the
Gophers' starting offensive unit is composed of nine
freshman and sophomores while the defensive unit has
five underclassmen listed as starters.
If that's not bad enough, freshman Brett Sadek, who
has emerged as Minnesota's starting quarterback,
recently was injuried in a Gopher game, prompting
Salem to say that without Sadek, "the Minnesota offense
went to pot." The way his team has been playing lately, I
would not be surprised if he was referring to the smoking
variety.
Ta heyGophers also have lost a coach. Salem, tired of
"getting kicked in the teeth," has announced his
resignation, effective at the end of the season. I've got to
give him credit for sticking around that long. If I was th-
e coach of a 1-8 team and my final two opponents were
bowl-hungry Michigan and Iowa teams, I sure wouldn't
want to see the bitter end.
And neither do the Minnesota fans, whom the Gophers
have also lost. The one thing I noticed about people I met
in Minneapolis is that none of them, although they are
students at Minnesota, go to the football games, even
when tickets are offered for free.
"I would never go to a Gopher game anymore," said
one disgruntled ex-fan. "I'm tired of always seeing them
lose. You couldn't get me to go with a free ticket unless
they promised a free keg of beer at the game."
The free keg of beer is not such a bad idea. At least
that way Minnesota fans could forget about how bad
their team really is.

Illini clinch Roses;

trounce Hoosiers

CHAMPAIGN (UPI) - Sixth-ranked Illinois
locked up its first Rose Bowl berth in 20 years by
defeating Indiana, 49-21, yesterday - the Illini's
ninth straight win that leaves them one game
away from a perfect Big Ten season.
The win, before 73,612 fans at Memorial
Stadium, assures the Fighting Illini of at least a
share of the conference title.
COACH MIKE white, who will return to his
native California for the classic Jan. 2, said he was
overwhelmed.
"This is the happiest day I've had coaching,"
White said. "Two words 'Rose Bowl' are like
magic if you're from where I am. I can remember
being 12 and sitting on a curb and watching the
parade. This means everything to me."
Illinois' winning streak is the longest at the school
since 1927-28. The Illini, who last played in the
Rose Bowl on Jan. 1, 1964, are 8-0 in the Big Ten
and 9-1 overall.
ILLINI FANS swarmed on the field with 21
seconds to go and tore down the goal posts for the
third straight home game. They danced and sang
on the field long after the players had gone to the
lockerroom.
Indiana Coach Sam Wyche, who coached with
White on the San Francisco 49ers staff, said he
was happy for his old friend.
"He's hung in there and stuck to his guns," said
Wyche, who is in his first year at Indiana. "This is
a team that deserves to go, no question about it.
I'll have to look long and hard at the films to
decide if Illinois played a really super game or if
we played bad.",
THE ILLINI, relying on the one-two punch of
running backs Dwight Beverly and Thomas Rooks,
used an effective offensive mix to hand the
Hoosiers their seventh defeat against three wins.
Indiana dropped to 2-6 in the Big Ten.
Rooks, who rushed for 134 yards in 18 carries,
scored two touchdowns on runs of 1 and 39 yards,
while Beverly ran for three TDs of 5, 13 and 1.
Illinois collected 306 rushing yards and 259 in the air.
Ohio State 55, Northustern 7
COLUMBUS (UPI) - Ohio State fullback
Vaughn Broadnax blasted two yards for a touch-
down with only 41 seconds gone in the game to set
the stage Saturday as 11th-ranked Ohio State
routed outmanned Northwestern, 55-7, yesterday.
Broadnax's touchdown came two plays after
Ohio State's Dennis Houston recovered Eric An-
derson's fumble of the opening kickoff on the Nor-
thwestern 5-yard line.
THAT PRETTY MUCH set the pattern for the
first half with Ohio State scoring five more times
for a 41-0 lead at intermission. Of Ohio State's
eight first-half possessions, six of them started in
Wildcat territory and all resulted in Buckeye
touchdowns.
The best field position Northwestern had in its
first seven drives of the half was its own 20-
yard line.
Broadnax, Ohio State's 252-pound senior
fullback, also scored the second touchdown on an
11-yard run midway through the first period, cap-
ping a 49-yard, four-play drive.
64IO STATE MADE it 20-0 with 1:30 left in the
period when quarterback Mike Tomczak went
over from eight yards out on a keeper. A 1-yard
run by tailback Keith Byars made it 27-0 four
minutes into the second quarter.
The Buckeyes, now 8-2 overall and 6-2 in the Big
Ten, scored twice in the final 2:16 of the half.
Byars scored his 18th touchdown of the year on a
2-yard run and after defensive tackle Dave
Crecelius recovered a fumble by Wildcat quarter-
back Steve Burton on the Northwestern 43. The
Buckeyes struck again in three plays, Tomczak
hitting tight end John Frank with a 11-yard
scoring pass.
Iowa 12, MSU 6
EAST LANSING (UPI) - Tom Nichol kicked
two field goals and quarterback Chuck Long threw

one touchdown pass yesterday to give Iowa a 12-6
victory over Michigan State.
The win boosted Iowa to 8-2 on the year and 6-2 in
the conference while Michigan State dropped to 4-
5-1 overall and 2-5-1 in the Big Ten.
NEITHER TEAM SCORED in the first quarter
with Michigan State sacking Long three times
behind the line and Ralf Mojsiejenko keeping the
Hawkeyes pinned deep with his punting.
While Mojsiejenko excelled in his punting, he
missed a 36-yard field .goal attempt coming off a
Thomas Allan interception of a long pass.
Iowa scored first when Nichol hit a 39-yard field
goal in the second quarter, capping a 55-yard, 10-
play drive. Iowa's march was highlighted by
Long's passes of 24 and 19 yards to wide receiver
Dave Moritz.
IN THE THIRD quarter, Nichol added a 40-yard
field goal and after an ineffective series by
Michigan State, Long once again took over. He
capped an 84-yard, 8-play drive with a 9-yard pass
to Eddie Phillips in the end zone.
Long had also hit Ronnie Harmon for gains of 28
and 11 yards in the drive.
Wisconsin 42, Purdue 38.
WEST LAFAYETTE (UPI) - Randy Wright
threw a 13-yard touchdown pass to Bret Pearson
with 32 seconds left to lift Wisonsin to a 42-38 vic-
tory over Purdue yesterday in a purely offensive
game.
The victory gave Wisconsin, still hoping for a
bowl bid, a 6-4 overall record and a 4-4 Big Ten
mark. Purdue dropped to 2-7-1 overall and 2-5-1 in
the Big Ten.
THE GAME WAS one where the last team with
the ball would win. The squads traded touch-
down throughout the second half, with Purdue get-
ting its last score on a three-yard run by Lloyd
Hawthorne with 2:35 left. That put Purdue ahead
38-35.
Wisconsin started its final drive on the Badger
37-yard line and marched to the Purdue 13, where
it had fourth down and 1 with 37 seconds left.

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCI
(Above) tight end Sim Nelson of Michigan juggles a Steve Smith touchdown
pass. (Below) Iowa's Eddie Phillips moves around Mgys Tom Allen in ac-
tion from the Hawkeyes' 12-6 win.

i

4

4

AP Photo
SECOND STRAIGHT LOSS TO MTU:

4

a

(Continued from Page 1)

'M'
pounds
Gophers
ointo the
ground
1;
SCORING PLAYS
Minn-FG Gallery.29 yards
Mich-Smith 75-yard run (Bergeron kick)
Mich-FG Bergeron, 39 yards
Mich-Markray 53-yard pass from Smith (Bergeron
kick)
Mich-Smith 20-yard run (Bergeron kick)
Mich-Markray 26-yard pass from Smith (Bergeron
kick)
Mich-Nelson 8-yard pass from Smith (Bergeron
kick)
Mich-FG Bergeron.33 yards
Mich-Smith 50-yard run (Bergeron kick)
Mich-Armstrong 1-yard run (Bergeron kick)

lead.
THE NEXT TIME Michigan got the
ball, Bergeron broke Haji-Sheikh's,
record with a 33-yarder and the
Wolverines took a 41-3 lead into the
lockerroom.
ALTHOUGH THE OHIO State game
next Saturday is the only contest left on
Michigan's schedule, athletic director
Don Canham said that the Wolverines'
post-season plans are still up in the air.
"We won't know until Sunday,"
Canham said. "We've got feelers from
every bowl. We don't know what we're
going to do. We've got theFiesta, Sugar,
and * Cotton Bowls represented here
tonight. That might tell you
something."
In the Sugar Bowl, the Southeast Con-
ophers domed tofailur

ference champion is likely to pla
either SMU or the winner of ti
Michigan-Ohio State game.
"WE HOPE IT will come out of tho:
three," said Henry Bodenheimer, wl;
is on the Sugar Bowl selection commi
tee. 'I would think at this point mor
inclined toward the Big Ten."
According to John Scovell, chairm
of the board of the Cotton Bowi. tt
Southwest Conference champion w
probably face Michigan, Ohio Stat
Iowa, or Georgia.
George Taylor, a member of t
Fiesta Bowl selection committee, sa
that his bowl would extend its two bi(
to either the Michigan-Ohio State lose
the Penn State-Pittsburgh winne
Georgia, or Washington.

ay
he
se
ho

Tech outskates Blue, 3-1

By JOE EWING
Special to the Daily

HOUGHTON - Michigan's hockey team lost to Michigan
re Tech for the second straight night, dropping a 3-1 decision to
the Huskies last night.
an "You have to play good on the road," said Michigan coach
ie John Giordano. "I know we can play well in our building but
ill we've got to learn what it takes to play on the road."
e, THE WOLVERINES are now 2-4 in Central Collegiate
Hockey Association play and 5-6 overall. All six of their losses
he have come on the road.
id The Wolverines showed slight improvement from the 8-2
ds drubbing they suffered Friday night but still appeared to
r, have a long way to go.
r, "I guess I'm disappointed because I look at Tech and
realize how far we have to go still to become a good team,"
said Giordano.r
IT TOOK NEARLY a whole period for either team to get on
the scoreboard, although both had plenty of first-period
chances.
"I thought we were lucky to survive the first period," said
TD Michigan Tech coach Jim Nahrgang. "Michigan came out
gunning and we were flat."
Todd Carlile lit up the goal light for Michigan at 19:13 of the
first stanza with Tech short-handed when he fired a sla shot
from the right point past Tech goalie Dave Roach after ohn
° Bjorkman won a faceoff deep in Tech's zone. It was Carlile's
fourth power-play goal of the season and his fifth overall.
° ALTHOUGH it took nearly a period for any goals to be
scored, there was still plenty of first-period excitement with

both teams dishing out quite a bit of hitting and tempers
flaring on both sides at times. Referees Mike Rublein and
Bruce Zida whistled down eight penalties in the first period,
and only 10 the rest of the game.
"Michigan out-hit us in the first period but we put our
skating and hitting together later," said Nahrgang. "That's
how we got our first goal."
The second period belonged exclusively to Tech as the
Huskies bounced back and outshot the Wolverines 22-2 while
tallying twice.
STEVE MURPHY started things off for the Huskies at 4:56
when he took a centering pass from Ally Cook and fired low
past Michigan goalie Mark Chiamp's stick.
Tech took the lead at 8:58 when Kurt Pearson picked up a
rebound in front of the Wolverine net after a flurry of Tech
shots and barely beat a sprawling Chiamp.
The third period was also all Tech as the Huskies not only
outshot and outscored the Wolverines, but also fought off an
early Michigan two-man advantage.
TECH'S DAVE Reierson and rian Clark were whistled off
at 4:44 and 5:52, giving the Wolverines the power play and a
faceoff in the Huskie zone. However, the Wolverines could
hardly keep the puck in Tech's end, let alone score, as the
outmanned Huskies continually cleared the puck from their
zone.
"We just couldn't get it going," said Giordano. "They were
forcing us and we were tentative. Just too tentative."
The Huskies showed the Wolverines just how to score a
power play goal at 9:16 as Murphy collected his second goal
of the night off the rebound of a Doug Harris shot while -
Michigan's Ray Dries was off for roughing.

RUSHING
MICHIGAN

Mich-FG Bergeron.51 yards
Minn-McMullen 5-yard pass from
lery kick)

Sadek (Gal-

Att. Yds.

First Downs .......
Rushing (att/yds) .
Passing Net Yards.
Passing (Att/
comp/int) .......
Total Yards ........
Fumbles (No./Lost).
Punts (No./Avg.) ...

MICH
29
57/423
208
22/12/0
631
2/2
3/28.0

Minn
9
34/56
101
25/8/1
157
2/0
10/41.2

S. Smith ...................
Rogers ....................
K. Smith ..................
White............. ....
Armstrong..............
Garrett ....................
Harbaugh .................
Hall.......................
Perryman .................
Logue ...:.................
Bean ......................
MINNES
Sadek...................
Wilson................
Nelson................
Small .....................
Hunter ....................

4
15
10
4
6
3
1
3
6
4
1

147
58
71
14
35
9
-2
18
35
29
9

3
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

0

Big Ten Standings

Illinois .............
MICHIGAN.......
Iowa ...............
Ohio State.........

Conf.
WLT
800
710
620
620

Overall
WLT
910
820
820
820
R A in

Scores
Virginia 17, North Carolina 14
Penn State 34, Notre Dame 30
Texas 20, Texas Christian 14
Clemson 52, Maryland 27
Arizona 27, UCLA 24
SMU 33, Texas Tech 7
Alabama 28,S. Mississippi 16

OTA
11
7
9
2
5'

-4
13
25
14
8

0
0
0
0
0

Going to
the dogs

PASSING
MICHIGAN

I

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