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November 13, 1983 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-11-13

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Wolverine Open Wrestling
Today at Crisler Arena
9:00 a.m.

SPORTS
Sunday, November 13, 1983

hockey vs. Michigan State
7:30 p.m. Friday, Yost Arena
Tickets available at
ticket office - Hoover and State

{

The Michigan Daily

Pago 7

Cagers topple AlA

in sloppy opener

0

By RANDY BERGER
It was as much as can be expected of an exhibition
game, a little sloppy play, missed layups and confusion
on defense. Nevertheless Michigan did achieve its
main objective last night, beating Athletes in Action,
-78-70.
"We have a long way to go, there's no question
about it," said coach Bill Frieder. "We didn't play
,.with the intensity you have to play with to be suc-
eessful and we didn't execute on offense, especially in
the first half."
RUSTY AND anemic best describe Michigan's play
,in the first half. The only reason that the Wolverines
went into halftime with a 29-27 lead was that AIA was
"even'slightly more anemic.
- "The only thing that kept us in the game in the first
'half was our rebounding and their poor shooting,"
added Freider. "If that was a Big Ten game we would
have been down by 20 instead of up by two."
Rebounding was definitely the most positive aspect
of the Wolverines' play. Butch Wade, who had 16
rebounds in the game, 10 of which came in the first
half, and Tim McCormick who pulled in 11 rebounds,
totally dominated underneath and essentially cov-
ered up for the rest of the team's poor play.
MICHIGAN"S shooting in the first half, 10 of 33
from the field, was horrible, especially when you con-

sider that many of those misses came on layups and
dunks.
"We missed far too many layups," said Frieder.
"A couple of our guys would rather be fancy than
good. They're in the big leagues now and they have to
do things the right way. The high school staff is
over."
It was obvious that there were first game jitters,
which partly justifies Michigan's sloppy play early in
the game.
"I WAS TOO excited," said sophomore Roy Tar-
pley, who fumbled away a perfect scoring oppor-
tunity trying to slam a dunk. "I've got to learn to keep
my head together."
Another player who experienced a little nervousness
was highly-touted freshman, Antoine Joubert.
Joubert, who entered the game midway through the
first half a midst enthusiastic applause, admittedly
forced his shots.
"I was putting a little additional pressure on myself
by trying to force my shots," said the guard from-
Detroit Southwestern. "I wanted to make one so
bad."
Joubert finally did get his first points as a college
player on a nice pass from Dan Pelekoudas. His
layup brought the sleepy crowd of 8,264 who were
shouting for Joubert to shoot, alive and provided a
spark to the team as it gave Michigan its largest lead

of the first half.
Michigan's overall play in the second half was
much improved. Behind Eric Turner, who ended the
game with 14 points and nine assists, the offense
began to execute.
Each time Athletes in Action would narrow the gap,
Turner seemed to spark his teammates. After AIA
had tied the game at 48-48 with 9:20 left, Turner
keyed a Michigan surge that outscored AIA 11-2 over
a four-minute stretch. The surge was capitulated
when Richard Rellford turned a perfect underhand
pass from Turner into a three-point play, putting
Michigan ahead 59-50.
After AIA narrowed the margin to 63-58, Turner
again sparked a Michigan rally. This time he took an
outlet pass from McCormick and drove the length of
the floor to score a basket off a goaltending call. The
basket put Michigan in front 69-63 with 1:44 left and
the outcome was never again in doubt.
In leading the Wolverines in the second half, Tur-
ner demonstrated that his role on this year's team
will be more that of a passer than a scorerm, he
believes the rest of the team is beginning to adjust to
this change.
"They're starting to know what to do with the ball
once they get it underneath," said the co-captain.
"We're startingto know each other more as far as
eye contact but we still have to improve on
ueverything."

full court
PRES
Gag rule for AIA .
.at least at Crisler
By JEFF BERGIDA
Athletes in Action came into Crisler Arena yesterday minus an i important
part of its "game plan," the halftime testimony. After two nights in Winston-
Salem, N.C. and College Park, Md. playing Wake Forest and Maryland, AIA
hit Ann Arbor but was not given the go-ahead to perform a presentation at
the half.
Some of the 8,200 fans present at the exhibition might be interested in what
they missed.
"Somebody usually will share what Christianity has meant to him" said
AIA coach Rle (pronounced Ar-lee) Nichols. "It's a 12-minute program. One
guy does an introduction another will share what Christ means to him per-
sonally and the last guy does a summary."-
Apparently, the absence of this presentation was not caused by a lack of
effort on the part of the Athletes in Action organization. "We ask (per-
mission to speak) at every school," said Nichols.
'Athletes in Action is the athletic ministry of Campus Crusade for Christ.
The basketball players are amateurs who are paid as staff and associates of
the organization. Based in Abbotsford, British Columbia AIA plays the top
colleges in the nation with the goal of winning ballgames while spreading the

Athletes deactivated

MICHIGAN

AIA

Min FG/A FT/A R A PF

McCormick....
Rellford .......
Wade..........
Rockymore ....
E. Turner .....
Joubert .......
Tarpley .......
Pelekoudas....
Thompson .....
Q. Turner ..
Team Rebounds
TOTALS ......

33
19
36
24
33
17
15
14
5
4

6/11
3/10
5/9
4/9
5/10
2/9
2/7
1/1
0/1
0/0

7/8
1/1
4/4
0/0
4/6
1/2
3/4
2/2
0/0
0/0

11
3
16
1
3
6
2
1
1
0
2

4
0
2
2
9
0
0
1
0
2

3
2
'1
0
0
2
3
3
1
0

Pts
19
7
14
8
14
5
7
4
0
0
78

Min1
Griffin .........18
Davis ........ 25
Haskins ........30
Bontrager ..... 36
Delph ......... 26
Hall ........... 25
Owens......... 16
Hoops ......... 8
Kellybrew. 16
Team Rebounds
TOTALS..

FG/AFT/A R

A PF Pts

3/10
0/2
2/6
6/16
7/11
5/10
1/5
0/0
2/4

2/2
1/3
1/2
4/4
0/0
2/2
0/0
0/0
8/11

4
6
2
3
2
3
2
0
4

0
1
0
4
0
2
0
0
2

1
4
1
3
0
3
3
0
3

8
1
5
16
14
12
2
0
12
70

8
26"/64 18/24 34

9 18

28167 22/27 47 20 15

Michigan's Roy'
78-70 Wolverine,

Daily Photo by DAN HABIB
Tarpley drives past his man to the hoop during yesterday's
victory over Athletes in Action. AIA's Jim Hoops (41) and

First half score: Michigan 29, AIA 27
Attendance - 8,264

Butch Wade of the Wolverines look on.

'M' harriers qualify

for NCAAs

word of Christ.
"Our number one objective is
to win for Christ, to win basket-
ball games," said Nichols.
AIA did not accomplish its first
objective yesterday and Nichols
sounded more like a basketball
coach than a minister , when
discussing the result.
"You'll find that playing on
the road you don't get the
breaks," said 10-year head man.
"A loose ball here, a goaltending
call there, you give all those
possessions up you're looking at
20 points a game."
But when questioned about the
halftime show, some of Nichol's
feelings on the issue came forth.
"If they don't want it (the
testimony), they don't, want it.
It's their option. It's no great
concern of ours. There's enough
schools that always want it and ask fa

'Our team is out to change
the world. We want to
make a positive impact by
sharing the gospel. We're
not cramming religion
down anyone's throat.
We're just sharing what's
important to us.'
- Mike McKee,
Athletes in Action

Special to the Daily
EAST LANSING - Brian Diemer
and Chris Brewster ran their best races
of the season, taking second and fifth
respectively, as Michigan's cross coun-
try team qualified for the NCAA cham-
pionships in the District Four clam-
pionship meet at Michigan State
yesterday.
Wisconsin, the Big Ten champion and
defending NCAA champion, won on
John Easker's winning time of 29:49.3.
But Michigan finished second, only 10
points behind a Badger squad which
traditionally dominates the Big Ten.
Purdue finished third, 73 points behind
Michigan. Illinois finished fourth in the
twenty-team meet. The top four teams
move on to the NCAA championships.
WOLVERINE COACH RON Worhur-
st was elated over his team's showing.
"Our guys ran a fantastic race," he
said. "There were two or three inches
of snow, and it was windy on the course,
but that didn't hurt us at all. We
have the confidence now to put in a good
performance at the nationals."
Warhurst credits Michigan's perfor-
mance to some new strategy. "We used
a new tactic this week," he said. "We
laid back, ran together in a group and it
worked."
The previous two times the
Wolverines faced Wisconsin, Michigan
was not as effective. At the Lehigh In-
vitational, it lost to the Badgers by 70,
and at the Big Ten championships
Wisconsin won by 50 points.

But in this 10,000-meter race,
Michigan gave Wisconsin a scare by
taking four of the top 20 spots. Besides
Diemer and Brewster, other Michigan
placers were Dennis Keane (eighth),
Dave Meyer (10), and Bill Brady (21).
Harriers disappoint
Special to the Daily
EAST LANSING - A couple of key
injuries devastated the women's cross
country team, as they finished a disap-
pointing 12th out of 20 at the district
championships yesterday.
Wisconsin won the event with 46 poin-
ts, Minnesota finished second with 86m
and Iowa came in third with 131. The
Badger's Cathy. Granta was the in-
dividual winner of the 10 kilometer
race.

MICHIGAN'S TOP runner, Suer
Schroeder, who is recovering from a
spike wound, could not even run in the
race. The Harriers' number three run-
ner, Kelli Burt, lost a shoe as she trip-
ped over another runner, but she kept
going another mile in the snow before
she twisted her ankle and dropped out.
The Wolverines' top finisher was
Bonnie McDonald, who came in 45th.
Cathy Schmidt, who had the flu all
week, finished 54th.
Considering all of Michigan's bad
luck concerning the meet, Wolverine
coach Francie Goodridge stressed the
team's performance. "Bonnie Mc-
Donald ran the best race of her career
and I was pleased with some of the
other runners."
The district meet was a qualifying
event for the NCAA championship
meet, with the top four teams moving
a on to the nationals.
Pistons 131, Kings 106
Special to the Daily
PONTIAC - The Pistons looked good
on defense but better on offense last
night as they ripped the Kansas City
Kings, 131-106, before 10,288 at the
Silverdome.-
Detroit opened up a 13-point lead
midway through the first period on the
shooting of Kelly Tripucka, who scored
33 points on the night.
THE QUARTER ended with the
Pistons ahead, 39-24, and Tripucka ac-
counting for 20 Piston points. The Kings

whittled Detroit's lead down to 10 points
in the second quarter as Piston coach
Chuck Daly substituted for four of his
starters.
Midway through the period, however,
the starters returned and so did
Detroit's lead; The first half ended with
the Pistons leading, 65-46.
Tripucka finished out his hot first half
by hitting 12 consecutive field goals to
tie a Piston record.
Detroit continued.its hot play in the
second half, building up a lead of 31
points against the Kings, who entered
the game tied with Cleveland for the
worst record in the NBA (2-5).
Bill Laimbeer added 21 points and 6
rebounds for the winners, while Da
Suttle led the Kings with 26 points.
The Pistons also traded two future
second-round draft choices and an u -
disclosed amount of cash for
Philadelphia forward/center Earl
Cureton.
Cureton, a 6-9, 250-pound Detroit
native, was Moses Malone's backup
center last season.
The three-year NBA veteran was
signed to a multi-year contract, accor-
ding to Piston general manager Jack
McCloskey.
Cureton entered last night's game
against Kansas City in the fourth quar-
ter after Piston coach Chuck Daly
heard continuous chants of "Earl"
from the crowd. Cureton played the last
two minutes of the game and scored one
point and dished off two assists.
- MIKE REDSTONE

;, 3
e f>,

"I guess, basically, we feel that a lot of things are sold through athletics,
some healthy and some not," he added. "We come to present something
positive. There's no question in my life that Christ offers hope to people. Why
not offer that to the audience?
"But they didn't want it. Christ isn't knocking anybody's head in to make
them listen."
Why wasn't AIA permitted to give its pitch?
"We didn't ask," said Nichols.
The members of the AIA squad are not a bunch of ministers who've never
played the game before. Starting guard Marvin Delph was a mainstay on the
Sidney Moncrief-led Arkansas teams that were national contenders in the late
70's. Andre Griffin was an All-Pac Ten forward last season and guard Ken
Owens was a fourth-round draft choice of the Seattle Supersonics.
Why did these potential pros choose to stay in the amateur ranks and
devote their lives to Christ? That's what they usually try to explain at the
half.
Mike McKee, a guard who played his college ball at North Carolina-
Greensboro, is in his second year with AIA. He was attending gruadate
school at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary when AIA contacted him.
After the game, McKee gave an example of what he would have said at half-
time:
"Playing for Athletes in Action is an honor' I want to make a difference in
the lives of other people and I want to share the most important thing in my
life, which is Jesus Christ.
"I played basketball for a lot of reasons in college. When I became a
Christian I wanted to play and spread the word of God. It's neat to go all over
the world and know that I'm playing for God. Our team is out to change the
world. We want to make a positive impact by sharing the gospel. We're not
cramming religion down anybody's throat. We're just sharing what's impor-
tant to us."
So the fans at Crisler did not get to hear what AIA had to say. But what's
more important, freedom of speech or another chance to hear Eric Becher
and the band play a rousing rendition of "Far From Over," that wonderful
Frank Stallone classic?

Diemer
... finishes second

Oilers crush Whings

Join the
Daily
Sports Staff

By RANDY SCHWARTZ
Special to the Daily
DETROIT - The Edmonton Oilers
traveling hockey machine passed
through here last night, leaving the
Wings and their sellout crowd of 20,088
on the losing end of a 7-3 score.
Wayne Gretzky continued his
awesome point-scoring as he nabbed a
hat trick and two assists, while Paul
Coffey, Randy Gregg, Pat Hughes and
Mark Messier added single markers for
the Oilers.
THE RED WINGS jumped to a 2-0
lead in the first 2:13 of the game with
goals by rookie Steve Yzerman and Ed-
die Johnstone. But the Oilers bounced
back quickly and headed into the locker

room with a 5-2 lead after the first
period.
Detroit threatened often in the second
period, outshooting the Oilers 13-4. But
Andy Moog, after a shaky start, stifled
the Wings and held them scoreless with
by back-to-back saves on breakaways
by Ivan Boldirev and Dwight Foster.
Oiler coach Glen Sather commented,
"Moog played a strong game,
especially in the second period when we
let up defensively. At the other end of
the rink, Greg Stefan was not sharp in
the early going, especially on Randy
Gregg's goal, a long floater from the
blue line that somehow eluded the
Detroit goaltender.-

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