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November 04, 1983 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-11-04
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COVER STORY.

Inside the internship

Page 1

With winter term rapidly approaching, many
students are getting concerned about their summer
plans. Summer, you may ask? Well, there's no time
like now to start planning for that internship, and
besides, many deadlines for applications are looming
up in the near future. Find out about the competition
you may be up against for that summer internship in
this weekend's story about the warring students and
what they get in return for long hours spent gathering
experience as an intern. Cover by Johnathan Stewart.
MUSIC
Get your musical fix Page 3
This week Ann Arbor is the proud host to a variety
of musical entertainment, from the popular rock of
the Fixx to the classical orchestrations of the New
World String Quartet. The Fixx will perform not one
but two shows at the Michigan on Monday for you die-
hard "Stand or Fall Fans". And don't miss your
opportunity to soak up some culture with the New
World String Quartet also on Sunday.
FILM

to be.at the right time for Democratic presidential
candidate John Glenn - what with all the attention
the film itself is receiving. In this week's review, find
out how this film explains the mystery behind the
men who have the just "stuff" to be American's
astronauts.
THE LIST
Happenings Pages 5-7
Your guide to fun times for the coming week in Ann
Arbor. Film capsules, music previews, theater
notes and bar dates - all listed in a handy-dandy,
day-to-day schedule. Plus a weekly feature on your
favorite foods.

Green eggs and Hammill

Peter Hammill's latest release, Patience, while not
necessarily the best effort from this prolific
singer/songwriter/musician, is nonetheless a gut-
level and thoughtful record. But everybody's cup of
tea? Read this week's review and see.
BANDS
Halfway tunes Page 9
The Halfway Inn is host to some pretty bizarre
local bands seeking to make it big on the new music
scene these days. Last week's concert proved that
there is definitely some talent out there to be
recognized. This week's band feature fills you in on
what's coming and going by way of local bands to see,
hear and avoid.
BOOKS

Page 8

Maas was one of 25 interns who com-
pletely staffed the agency, which is
responsible for mediating consumer
complaints. Although she had to do
some clerical work, Maas also got to do
her own legal research.
Smaller businesses or organizations
also tend to provide students with more
hands-on experience than they might
pick up as part of a larger staff.
After his stint at WDIV, Nash inter-
ned at a Toledo television station where
he was able to edit television tapes (a
unionized position at most larger
stations), work closely with the full-
time anchors, and appear regularly on
the air as a sportscaster.
Television interns usually apply to
the larger stations thinking of "the
bright lights and the big city," he says.
"But they don't realize that in order to
be on the air, you've got to go to a small
station."
Because many students apply only to
larger organizations, they often are
disappointed with the level of respon-
sibility and independence they are
given, according to Peggy Carroll,
director of placement of the Univer-
sity's business school.
"Students have unrealistic expec-
tations about their first professional
experience," she says, but they don't.
realize that most internships are
designed to "bridge the gap from
school and the college atmosphere to
the world of work."
Salaries can be a disappointment as
well. Interns, for the most part,
shouldn't count on making next year's
tuition over the summer. While ther
e are some fields which offer lucrative
jobs (see related story), most offer only
experience as compensation for long
hours and hard work.
Interns often find themselves as low-
people on the totem pole, especially in
terms of scheduling. Although many in-
terns work from nine to five, others'
work schedules fluctuate and personal
lives must be planned around their
jobs. Overtime is not uncommon and
usually is not rewarded. Some interns
report there were days where they
worked up to 15 hours.

Students in engineering, computer
science and, to a lesser extent,
business usually garner top wages -
anywhere from $5 to $10 an hour.
Medical-related, art, architecture, and
some communication students, on the
other hand, usually are left to fight over
voluntary positions.
For students who land either volun-
tary or low-paying positions, the Public
Service Intern Program offers grants
to qualified interns which equal the
average cost of housing and living ex-
penses for the duration of their inter-
nship.
But other interns aren't so lucky and
the popularity of voluntary jobs leads
many students to believe that finan-
cially secure students have an unfair
advantage in the race for internships.
Sophomore Inteflex student Allan
Mishra searched for a paid internship
in his hometown of Okemos last sum-
mer, but ended up working at a retail
store.
"I could waltz into any lab on this
campus and probably get paid," he
says. "But if I stayed (in Ann Arbor) all
summer I wouldn't be able to save any
money after paying room and board."
According to Richter, it is generally
up to the intern to demonstrate a
willingness to accept added respon-
sibility and to take the first step.
LSA senior Michael Katz says his job
in U.S. Rep. John Dingell's office
"would have turned into a go-fer job"
had he not asserted himself.
While the other interns in his office
were spending their time typing form
letters to Dingell's constituents, Katz
proposed a research project on defense
department expenditures to Dingell, a
Dearborn Democrat, who approved the
project.
It also helps to be aware of a firm's
goals, problems, and trends in that par-
ticular industry.
Scott Almquist, an LSA junior, used
his knowledge about Cedar Point to
land an internship as an internal
auditor.
"Cedar Point was changing owner-
ship from a corporation to a partner-
ship," he explains. "I knew about the
acquisition and realized my job would

Anything goes

Page 12

V
N
N
N,
Y:

The third installment of a supposedly humorous tri-
logy of books (The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
and The Restaurant at the End of the Universe being
the first two) is aptly entitled Life, the Universe, &
Everything. See if anything, indeed, goes by reading
this week's book review.r

Tom Nash: Persistence pays off

The right time

Page 4

Warner Brothers release of the Right Stuff seems 'The Right Stuff': Blasts off

Weekend
Fridoy, November 4, 1983
Vol. II, Issue 8
Magazine Editors ................ Mare Hodges
Susan Makuch
Sales Manager ......................Meg Gibson
Assistant Sales Manager .........Julie Schneider

Weekend is edited and managed by students on the
staff of The Michigan Daily at 420 Maynard, Ann Ar-
bor, Michigan, 48109. It appears in the Friday edition
of the Daily every week during the University year
and is available for free at many locations around the
campus and city.

Weekend, (313) 763-0379 and 763-0371; Michigan
Daily, 764-0552; Circulation, 764-0558; Display Adver-
tising, 764-0554.
Copyright 1983, The Michigan Daily.

be central to the park. I knew my work
would count."
For some students, internships can
either confirm a student's commitment
to a particular profession or drastically
alter career goals. For Maas, her inter-
nship at the Consumer Protection
Agency was the deciding factor in
choosing between a career in jour-
nalism or one in law.
LSA senior Shari Lynn started her in-
ternship with an Ann Arbor public
relations firm last summer with every
intention of making this her life's work.
"I'm glad I had the internship,
because I know public relations is not
for me," Lynn said.
"I expected the job to be more
writing and communicating with
people," she said of her job with The

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330 E. Liberty

665-9919

Expires
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prospective employers:
Will I learn by doing or wat-
ching?
Will I have the space and
facilities I need for my work?
Does the person who will be
my supervisor understand his
or her role?

May I have the names of for-
mer interns? (Talk to more than
one).
- Prepare a resume and
cover letter that recognize the
firms goals and matches your
qualifications with their needs.
Apply for a specific position.
Address the cover letter to a
specific person.
- Always follow up a resume
with a phone call and, like-wise
an interview with a thank you
letter.

663-3355, 663-4244

In . . 0

2 Weekend/November 4, 1983

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