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November 01, 1983 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ninety-four Years
of
Editorial Freedom

Mit-Iia

atitj

Fair
The skies will be partly cloudy
today and the temperature
should reach the low 60s.

ol. XCIV-No. 48 Copyright 1983, The'Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan - Tuesday, November 1, 1983 Fifteen Cents Twelve Pages

U.S.

admits

to

bombing

Grenadian
institution

Trick or Treat Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
This Halloween ghoul spent the evening drinking with the spirits at Dooley's while others celebrated with the traditional door-to-door approach to
tricking and treating.
Colle e town debates nuclear ban

From AP and UPI
BRIDGETOWN, Barbados - U.S. in-
vaders in Grenada sorted seized
weapons and documents yesterday,
admitted they accidentally bombed a
mental hospital and said the military
leader of the ousted junta has been
detained on a warship.
The Reagan administration said
reports that up to 50 civilians perished
at the hospital in last week's air strike
were exaggerated.
A Pentagon source, who declined to
be identified, said that 14 people died in
the attack by a Navy A-7 bomber based
on the USS Independence.
U.S. forces were not , aware the
building was a hospital, the White
House said. Military officials said they
did not learn about the casualties at the
hospital until early yesterday, although
the attack apparently had occurred on
the first day of theinvasion, Oct. 25.
The United States and seven of
Grenada's non-communist neighbors
launched the invasion following a coup
by radical Marxists in the government
who killed Prime Minister Maurice
Bishop Oct. 19.
In Washington, the Reagan ad-
ministration was considering whether
to make public some of the documents
seized in the invasion. Officials said the
documents inlcude military supply con-
tracts between Bishop's government
and Cuba, the Soviet Union and North
Korea.
White House spokesman Larry
Speakes said that Gen. Hudson Austin,
leader of the 16-member junta that

overthrew and killed Prime Minister
Maurice Bishop, had been detained on
the USS Guam off the Grenadian coast
"for his personal protection."
The stated aim of the invaders is to
restore order, protect civilians and
evacuate foreigners who wished to
leave the tropical Caribbean island of
110,000 people.
But President Reagan also- claims
that Cubans working on the island were
building -military installations and
stockpiling weapons in preparation for
a Cuban takeover.
Cuban President Fidel Castro has
denied the accusation, denounced the
U.S. action and demanded -a full ac-
counting of the number of Cubans
killed, wounded and seized on Grenada.
Soviet- and Cuban-made weapons
were among the arsenals found on the
island. Jamican Prime Minister Ed-
ward Seaga, given a tour by military of-
ficials, said he was shown an
estimated 100,000 grenades and 4
million rounds of ammunition.
Meanwhile House Speaker Thomas
O'Neill Jr. said he was dispatching a
congressional delegation to Grenada
later this week to investigate "all
facets" of the American invasion of the
island.
On the eve of a House vote requiring
President Reagan to withdraw the
troops from Grenada within two mon-
ths, O'Neill Named Rep. Thomas Foley
(D-Wash.) to lead members of . the
House Foreign Affairs, Armed Services
See U.S., Page 3

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) - From a basement of-
vice located midway betweeen Harvard and MIT,
peace activists are waging a campaign to ban
nuclear weapons work in Cambridge - a ban that
could halt more than $100 million in missile design
contracts.
M\/embers of Mobilization for Survival are working
to declare Cambridge a "nuclear-free zone," where it
would be a crime to design, build or store nuclear
weapons. The city's 44,000 voters will decide the issue
Nov.8,
THE. MAIN target of the campaign is the Charles
Stark Draper Laboratory, a high-technology spinoff
from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that

employs about 1,800 people. Draper holds some $140
million in contracts with the Defense Department,
most of it for guidance systems on MX, Poseiden,
Trident and cruise missiles.
In the past eight weeks, the campaign has divided
this intellectual community. Nobel Prize winners are
lined up on opposing sides - biologist Geroge Wald of
Harvard is for it, and physicist Samuel Ting of MIT is
opposed. So are the presidents of Harvard and MIT.
"We have the right to say we will not be complicit
in the arms race," said Richard Schreuer, a
Mobilization Volunteer. "Draper is directly con-
tributing to the arms race."
DRAPER OFFICIALS said the campaign poses an

economic threat. "We could be genetic research next
year, then who knows what," said company vice
president Joseph O'Connor.
If the referendum passes, the Nuclear-Free Cam-
bridge Campaign would be a major breakthrough for
a movement that seeks to end the arms race village
by village across the world.
Cambridge, a city of 95,000 academics, workers,
and immigrants, situated across the Charles River
from Boston, would be the largest U.S. city to declare
itself off-limits to weapons work. It would also be the
first nuclear-free zone established in a place where
weapons design is carried out.
See CAMBRIDGE, Page 2

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...... ..... .. .................. ...v...........r....... ..... ...................... ..............................................~}:^}i::;:{:?::L4"i}:?"?i:>~ii}:::}^ii ii: :::
Black mayors split
on Jackson candidacy

Markley madness

From AP and UPI
The Rev. Jesse Jackson's campaign
for the presidency may not land him in
the White House, but it will spark new
interest in politics for blacks, increase
registration and give blacks greater
leverage, some black officials said
yesterday after Jackson announced his
candidacy Sunday.
"He will inspire thousands of our
people to register to vote," said Johnny
Ford, mayor of Tuskegee, Ala., and
president of the National Conference of
Rlt Maors.n "Bv running he will

help many of our people get elected to
local, county and state offices." But
most important, Ford said, "he will be
an inspiration to our people."
"I do not feel that he will get the
nomination," said CincinnatieCity
Manager Sylvester Murray, "but I do
think that his running wil provide some
pride to minorities, and will' provide a
sense of being part of the system."
Other black leaders were less en-
thusiastic about Jackson's decision
Sunday to seek the Democratic
See MAYORS, Page 9

Jackson
will file onmiThulrsdav

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............ y ............. .. , ...... ..
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- v r.". ..f.. .b. ... ......... ..n..........h............ . h... ..... ....................~......::..........,,...... . . ."::
Woman dies in ossible s uici e
By MATT TUCKER

Rumors
of doom
stir dorm
By BARRY WITT
Good morning Mary Markley, are you
still there?
Rumor had it that some of your
residents - 55 to be exact, or was it 53?
- were in for a rough Halloween night.
Since the weekend, the dorm has been
abuzz with talk of tragedy because a
national astrologist Allegedly predicted
doom.
STHE STORY goes that the omniscient
prognosticator Jeanne Dixon wrote in
the National Enquirer last summer that
55 people would be killed on Halloween
night in a Big Ten University building
shaped like a letter of the alphabet.
At least, that's how one story goes.
Other Markleyites said last night that
they had heard the prediction was in the
Enquirer, but that it wasn't Jeanne
Dixon's. Still others said that it was in
fact Jeanne Dixon, but it was in the Star
and it involved 53 students.
See MARKLEY, Page 9

A 21-year-old local woman fell to her death early Sunday
morning from her room on the 20th floor of Tower Plaza, a
central campus highrise located at 555 E. William.
Ann Arbor Police said they found the body of Carolyn T.
Won lying on the street at 5:45 a.m. Sunday.
Won was an LSA senior last term, but she is not listed as
having graduated. University officials said no information
was available on her status as a student this term. Won's
permanent address as registered with the University last
year was her Tower Plaza apartment.
ALTHOUGH POLICE would not call the death a.suicide,
they did say there were "no signs of struggle or indications of
foul play," and said Won either fell or jumped from her apar-

tment window.
Resdients of the 20th floor declined comment on the
fatality.
The incident marks the first probable suicide of this
academic year. Last year three students commited suicide,
two in residence halls and one living off campus.
WON'S DEATH ALSO brings to two the number of
fatalities connected with Tower Plaza: On May 13th, 1982,
University professor Philip Brickman leapt to his death from
the roof of the 26-story building.
Brickman was not a resident of the complex.
Won's body was taken immediately to University Hospital,
where an autopsy was ordered. The results of the autopsy
were not available at press time.

Is this Markley? It just might be, if the rumors that swept the dormitory last
night turn out to be true.

i

TODAY-
Pay, don't play
HE ROCK GROUP Boston has been sued for $20
million for failing to produce enough albums. The
c'iviT nit fihxrl in TT C Tistriet Cnart in Manhattan-

moon

pyschiatrist testified she was sane when she took the
money. Janet Knaeble was convicted Friday by a Maricopa
County, Ariz., Superior Court-jury on five counts of grand
theft in embezzling funds from the Phoenix office of
Nabisco. During the trial before Judge Cheryl Hendrix,
witnesses said Knaeble took the money while she worked
for Nabisco between 1972 and 1976. Her attorney, Dennis
Jones, told jurors the crimes were commited by one of
Knaeble's 16 personalities known as Tarrah, who did not
know right from wrong. He asked jurors to find his client

nick, 66, of Brooklyn, reported to the Internal Revenue
Service she was a housewife with an income of $21,000 from
1976 to 1978, according to a grand jury indictment in U.S.
District Court in Manhattan last Thursday. Instead, she
earned $200,000 in those years from peddling umbrellas,
gloves, and handbags and from shrewd stock market in-
vestments, the indictment said. Lipnick is accused of
falsely stating her occupation as a housewife while neglec-
ting to mention her profitable peddling business, as well as
under-reporting income derived from dividends on stock

1942 - The University was criticized by a Navy
lieutenant for not having enough students enlisting in the
armed forces.
1954 - The Literary College faculty voted to ask the
school-to grant severance pay to a professor who was
dismissed for refusing to testify before the House Commit-
tee on Un-American Affairs.
1974 - Michigan Gov. William Milliken announced he
would keep his running mate, James Damman, even
though Damman was accused of unethical politics as a
Trnv cityo ntnnril and ninanffninl '1

I

1

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