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October 25, 1983 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Michigan-Illinois Football
Televised by CBS
Kickoff 12:35 EDT

SPORTS

Women's Volleyball
vs. Michigan State
7:00 p.m. at CCRB

The Michigan Daily

Tuesday, October 25, 1983

Pagel7

Schembechler

downplays

TEAM Michigan Football Statistics

Illni s 'dirty' reputation

By JOHN KERR
4If there are hostile feelings between
the Michigan and Illinois football
teams going into Saturday's "Big Ten
title" game, both the head coaches
won't admit it.
"I don't think there's any of that,"
said Illinois coach Mike White over the
speaker phone at Bo Schembechler's
weekly press luncheon. "I don't know
aaw that cropped up and I don't put
imuch stock in it."
.LAST SEASON, in Michigan's 16-10
,win over the Illini in Champaign, many
Wolverine players complained that
--- r 7Ur

v Z-

Illinois had played dirty football, ver-
baly taunting them and taking cheap
shots. Schembechler said, however,
that his team does not care about such
things.
"Those things mean nothing," he
said. "We're playing for the Big Ten
title. You can point your finger all day,
it doesn't bother me."
It may not bother Bo, but it has
bothered some other Big Ten teams.
A few of Illinois' opponents have ac-
cused it of not playing by the rules. The
Illini are a very tough and physical
m

team and so far this season have in-
jured. Michigan State's top two quar-
terbacks and Ohio State's Mike Tom-
czak. When asked what he thought
about that, Bo replied, "Oh they've
showed a little exuberence."
THIS SATURDAY, the Illini should
be very exuberent. With both teams
sporting 5-0 conference records, the
winner of this game will almost surely
go to the Rose Bowl, even if it should
lose one of its final three games. That's
because if the two teams tie for the title,
the winner of Saturday's game would
be the champion. Illinois hasn't been to
the Rose Bowl since 1964.
Bo said that he thought Illinois would
be a "shoo-in" for the Rose Bowl if it
beat the Wolverines, but that the rever-
se was not necessarily true.
"I don't believe if we win the Illinois
game we're a shoo-in," he said, "but I
do believe if Illinois wins they are a
shoo-in. That's because of the schedule.
"We've got Purdue, Minnesota, and
Ohio State left and they've got Indiana,
Minnesota, and Northwestern," Bo
said.

Total First Downs .
Rushing .........
Passing .........
Penalty .......
Total Net Yards ...
Total Plays.
Avg. Per Play ...
Avg. Per Game..
Net Rushing Yards
Total Attempts .
Avg. Per Play ...
Avg. Per Game..
Net Passing Yards.
Att/Comp/Int ...
Avg. Per Att..
Avg. Per Comp..
Avg. Per Game..
Punt/Yds/Avg ....
Pt Ret/Yds/Avg ...
KO Ret/Yds/Avg..
Int/Yds/Avg ......
Fumbles/Lost .....
Penalties/Yds .....
Scoring
Total Pts/Avg ...
Touchdowns .....
Rushing .......
Passing .......
Other .......
PATK/Att.
2 pt Conv/Att....
Field Goals/Att..
Third Down Conv/Att
Success Pet......

M
166
118
43
5
2771
535
5.2
395.9
2041
408
5.0
291.6
730
127/64/8
5.7
11.4
104.3
22/850/38.6
22/233/10.6
12/235/19.6
12/91/7.6
9/3
39/300
218/31.1
28
22
5
1
20/25
0/3
10/12
47/97
.485

Opp
104
47
52/
5
1665
408
4.1
237.9
627
215
2.9
89.6
1038
193/111/12
5.4
9.4
148.3
38/1583/41.7
6/23/3.8
23/393/17.1
8/152/19.0
10/6
34/282'
94/13.4
11
3
7
1
9/9
2/2
5/7
31/89
.348

S. Smith.........
Garrett..........
Mercer..........
Rice...........
Logue...........
Armstrong ......
Perryman .......
White...........
Hall.............
S. Johnson .......
Witcher .........

56
47
30
34
9
11
10
9
7
1
1

341
230
151
135
43
37
29
16
9
-2

6.1
4.9
5.0
4.0
5.2
3.9
3.7
3.2
2.3
9.0
-2.0

0
1
2
1
0
1
0
1
0
0

Rice""..............
Schlopy .............
Bean ................
Carthens..........
Garrett...........
Hally.............
Logue.............
Mallory...........
Mercer............
Nelson...........
Perryman.........

1
1

3
2

1
1

18-
18
1-2 9-
6
6
6
67
6
6
6

I

F

MICHIGAN........ 408 2041 5.0 22
Opponents ......... 215 627 2.9 3
Passing
PA PC Int Pct Yds
S. Smith .............104 53 6 .510 638
Hall ................. 22 11 2 .500 92
Harbaugh ........... 1 0 0 .000 0
MICHIGAN ......... 127 64 8 .504 730
Opponents.......... 193 111 12 .575 1038
Receiving
No Yds - Avg TD
Nelson............. 23 272 11.8 1
Bean .............. 14 213 15.2 1
Rogers............. 11 90 8.2 0
K.Smith...........5 41 8.2 0
Carthens ...........3 59 19.7 1
Armstrong......... 3 13 4.3 0
Garrett............ 2 11 5.5 1
Markray........... 1 17 17.0 0
G. Johnson......... 1 12 12.0 0
ice...............1 2 2.0 1

MICHIGAN ......... 22 5 1 10-12 218.
Opponents........... 3 7 1 5-7 94
TDr-Rush TDp-Pass TDo.-Other
Field Goals
20-29 30-39 40-49 50+ Tot
Bergeron.............2-2 4-4 3-3 0-1 9-14
Schlopy.............. 1-2 1-2
MICHIGAN ......... 2-2 5-6 3-3 0-2 1042
Opponents"..........1-1 24 1-1 1-1 5
Punting
No Yds Avg Long
Bracken ........... 22 850 38.6 53
MICHIGAN........ 22 850 38.6 53
Opponents.......... 38 1583 41.7 58
Returns
PR/Yds/Avg/LP KOR/Yds/Avg/LP
Cooper ........ 16/190/11.9/41
G. Johnson... 6/43/7.2/12 4/60/15.0/28
K. Smith ... 3/75/25,0/38
S.Johnson .... 2/28/14.0/20
Rogers ........1/25/25.0/25
Wicher ....... 1/23/23.0/23
White .........1/14/14.0/14

UPI Top Twenty

WLT
1. Nebraska .................8-0-0
1. Texas .........................6-0-0
'3. North Carolina .............8-0-0
¢4. Florida ........................6-0-1
5.-Auburn......................6-1-0
6. Georgia .................. 6-0-1
7. Miami (Fla.) .................7-1-0
8. MICHIGAN ...............6-1-0
l 9. Illinois ....................6-1-0
10. Maryland .....................6-1-0
Medicare
free-flowing as it has been in the past.
"ONE CHANGE is clear: There will
no longer be an automatic increase in
revenue flowing into the institution,"
Ward said. "There'll be little if any in-
crease, and probably a decrease in
revenue., That means it is going to be
hard to keep the hospital and medical
school complex afloat at its current
size," he predicted.
Neither Ward nor Forsyth would say
exactly where their units might cut to
offset the effects of the new program.
Forsyth and his staff currently are
conducting investigations into which of
their departments are big losers and
which make money. Until they com-
plete that analysis. Forsyth said, it is
impossible to tell which areas will be
affected.
"AS LONG AS we can maintain the
bottom line of breaking even, services
won't be cut,"Forsyth said.
As DRGs are phased in, two things
should work in the hospital's favor. Fir-
st, it will receive a subsidy because it is
a teaching hospital. In addition, reim-
bursements for hospitals with special
ases that are unusually severe or
complicated will provide additional in-
come.
But even with these special subsidies,
DRGs "will change the way a hospital
behaves, with respect to physicians,
and how they (doctors and hospital ad-
ministrators) market their services,"
Ken Rasky; a senior vice president of
the Michigan Hospital Association,
said.
DRGs will create a new kind of
relationship between doctors and
hospital administrators, one which
gives the administrator more control

11. Washington ...................6-1-0
12. Southern Methodist ..........5-1-0
13. West Virginia ................6-1-0
14. Oklahoma ....................5-2-0
15. Brigham Young ...............6-1-0
16. Ohio State .................5-2-0
17. Iowa ..........................5-2-0
18. Boston College ................6-1-0
19. Alabama ......................4-2-0
20. Pittsburgh.................5-2-0

INDIVIDUAL
Rushing
Att Yds Avg T
rs ............ 128 653 5.1 9
mith .......... 65 343 5.3 3

MICHIGAN..
Opponents.........

64
111

730 11.4 5
1038 9.4 7

Scoring
TDr TDp TDo
Rogers .............. 9
Bergeron .....4
S. Smith............. 4

Roge
K. Si

TD
9
3

FG TP
54
9-10 41
24

MICHIGAN .. 22/233/10.6/41
Opponents ..... 6/23/3.8/13

12/235/1
23/393/1

payment
over what treatment patients
receive.
BECAUSE THE government
only pay a designated amount for a
tain illness - and that price is expe
to cover drugs, tests, the room, and
additional costs except the physic
fee - administrators trying to n
ends meet may pressure doctors t
der fewer tests, restrict prescriptio
expensive drugs, and discharge pa
ts as quickly as possible.
Forsyth insists that quality contr
University Hospital will insure4
patient gets the best possible ti
ment, but Ward maintains that do
will not have the freedom to try
perimental tests or drugs, which tel
be more costly.
In addition, Ward said,
flexibility for new prog
development is not going to be the
High technology equipment used
diagnosis or treatment will
"goodies" that hospitals will hav
learn to live without, he said.
GOODIES LIKE PET scanning
new technology which allows the
tors to observe changes in the br
will be affected because DRGs
place "sharp restrictions on how
can apply expensive diagnostic it
vention," Ward said.
"With DRGs, the hospital wil
anxious to do only exams which
essential," said William Martell, c
of radiology at the hospital and on
DRGs' few supporters in the Unive
community.
Martell says the new system
provide an added incentive to
discriminating about which tests t
der, making hospital operations n
efficient.

changes upset
will But it is not only a matter of efficien- cost.
cy versus inefficiency. Hospitals will no Til
will longer be able to support the variety of in th
cer- services most people expect, some ad- when
°cted ministrators say. DRG
I any "THIS HOSPITAL and others will no pictu
ian's longer be able to be all things to all mini
nake people," Forsyth said. aroui
o or- "The typical hospital that will do well Be
ns of (under the DRG system) is the 200 to again
tien- 400 community hospitals with relatively ten y
straightforward cases," Ward said. custo
01 at Teaching and specialized-care tests
each hospitals, despite their special reim- litiga
reat- bursements and subsidies, stand to lose Cos
ctors the most, he said. torsc
ex- "AS YOU GET these DRGs drawn their
nd to up, they have neither the understan- healt
ding, backing, or ability to recognize But
"the that medical care in hospitals like ber o
ram (University Hospital) is far more ex- docto
re." pensive," the dean said. puts
for "(DRGs) are a series of arbitrary,
be capricious, and ill-advised remedies
e to that will cause great pain to a stable
system," Ward said.
g, a He said the balance of power within
doc- the system will shift, with ad-
rain, ministrators pressuring doctors to
will discharge patients as soon as possible.
one FOR EXAMPLE, under the DRG
nter- system, a hospital will be allowed to
keep a splenectomy patient under the
1 be age of 17 for nine days. If the patient is
are well enough to leave in five, the hospital
chief gets four extra days of payment.
ie of The plan also sets a limit on how many,
rsity extra days, if any, the government will
cover. Extensions are to be decided on
will a case-by-case basis.
be Should the splenectomy patient en-
o or- counter complications during treat-
nore ment, the hospital can receive payment
for a maximum of 29 days; any further

'U' administrators

must be absorbed by the hospital.
ERE ARE several other problems
he medical care industry which,
combined with the advent of
s, paint a rather bleak financial
re for physicians and hospital ad-
strators. One problem revolves
nd malpractice.
cause the number of lawsuits
nst doctors has soared over the last
years, doctors have become ac-
med to ordering a broad array of
to protect themselves from
tion.
st has not been a concern, so doc-
did whatever they could to insure
own security and the patient's
h.
t under the DRG system, the num-
f tests, or experimental drugs, a
r can choose will be limited. This
"hospitals and physicians clearly

in a wedge," as far as one hospital ad-
ministrator is concerned.
the legislation calls for the DRG plan
to be phased inover a three-year period.
In the first year, the federal gover-
nment will pay hospitals 75 percent" of
what they used to get and 25 percent of
the DRG allocation.
In the second year, hospitals can ex-
pect to receive 50 percent of the old
payment and, in the third year, the
government will pay hospitals 75 per-
cent of the DRG limit and 25 percent of
the old one.
By 1986, if the legislation is im-
plemented unamended, hospitals will
receive 100 percent of all Medicare
payments based on the DRG limit.
Not all hospitals will be subject to the
restrictions DRGs pose. Psychiatric
and rehabilitation hospitals are two
which will be exempt.

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