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October 21, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-21

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 21, 1983
Faculty urge salary

By SHARON SILBAR
The University's top faculty committee urged the
University's regents to place faculty salaries as a
high priority - "perhaps second after fixed costs" -
when they made their annual salary request at the
regent's monthly meeting yesterday.
"Faculty overall, have demonstrated forebearance
as the University has undergone serious fiscal trials
during the past several years," said Cheryl Easley, a
nursing professor and member of the Senate Ad-
visory Committee on University Affairs (SACUA).
"It is however, discouraging to perceive faculty
compensation to be a residual item of budget plan-
ning," she added.

'Perhaps second
after fixed costs'
THIS YEAR, faculty salaries rose an average of
about 5 percent - a figure higher than the inflation
rate but not enough to make up for deficiencies in
previous years, faculty members say.
A report released earlier this week from a SACUA
subcommittee said that University faculty members
only make 93 percent of what professors do at peer
institutions - both public and private.
"The implications of these trends for faculty

as priority
quality and morale are, we believe, quite serious,"
the report concluded.
Easley also requested administrative attention to
the problem of eroding fringe benefits. Although in th
past, fringe benefits have compared favorably to
other institutions. Easly said those benefits hav
decreased significantly in the past few years, and
they no longer make up for comparatively small
salary increases.
Regent Thomas Roach (D-Saline) acknowledged
SACUA's request, but said they could not be oblivious
to the obvious attempts made by Billy Frye, vice
president for academic affairs and provost, in the,
area of faculty salaries.

Haig sets policy priorities

(Continued from Page21)
ameliorate those problems and see that
their resolution ends up in our favor.
The former NATO leader and advisor
to six American presidents said this
country must follow a foreign policy
based on human rights and "the critical
"aspects of a democratic dream."
Haig will lead three seminars for
small groups of students tomorrow, and
he and his wife Patricia will have din-
ner at the home of University President
Harold Shapiro.

The Haigs will end their stay in Ann
Arbor Saturday with the Michigan-
Iowa football game, which Haig said
the Wolverines should be able to win "if
they sharpen up that secondary."
LSA Dean Peter Steiner, who in-
troduced Haig as "someone of general
interest," said former Attorney
General Ramsey Clark will be the next
speaker in the 'Warner-Lambert lec-
ture series. He is scheduled to speak
this spring.

Protesters die' for Haig

(Continued from Page 1)
yesterday afternoon.
Prior to last night's speech, members
of the Progressive Student Network, a
radical anti-defense group, staged a
"die-in" on the steps of Rackham, par-
tially obstructing the entrance to the
building.
HAIG SAID the protesters were a
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small minority who have little effect on
him.
"I don't welcome this (radical
behavior)," he said after his speech.
"It lacks rationality. The large
majority of students came to listen ...
and they were angered (by the disrup-
tion)."
NOT EVERYONE in attendance op-
posed Haig's presence on campus. At
one point, a woman got up and told the
audience, "Let the man speak. Save
your childish taunts for the
playground." Others joined her, telling
the protesters to "shut-up" and "go to
Russia."
About 200 people, anticipating Haig's
departure, gathered in the basement of
Rackham. Haig supporters yelled back
at anti-Haig people during the wait but
both groups of people were outsmarted
when Haig used a different route to get
out of the building.
Students and staff members who
could not get into the speech sat on the
floor of the lobby and pounded on the
doors of the auditorium to be let in.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Iran's forces seize Iraqi land
NICOSIA, Cyprus - Iranian forces struck Iraqi artillery positions in Kurd-
istan early yesterday and pushed across the border in a major new offen
sive.
Iranian news media said the troops captured 40 square miles of enemy:
territory and a series of strategic heights, but Baghdad radio said the offen-
sive had been "contained and repulsed, with the enemy forced to flee leaving
behind the bodies of dead soldiers littering the battleground."
Iraq said the campaign was "completely foiled after most of the attacking
force was wiped out," and promised retaliatory strikes of "immense-
strength."
The claims and counter-claim could not be confirmed because foreig;
reporters are banned from the front.
Iran's official Islamic Republic News Agency said more than 2,000 Iraqi
troops were killed or wounded in the first four hours of the battle. IRNA said
Iranian forces also captured scores of Iraqis and Kurdish rebels supported
by Iraq
Economy zips past predictions
WASHINGTON - Government figures indicated yesterday the economy
grew at a brisk 7.9 percent annual rate in the third quarter, retaining more of
the previous quarter's zip than most analysts envisioned. President
Reagan's spokesman said "The economy has moved out of the recovery
phase and into expansion."
The Commerce Department, in its preliminary estimate for the July-
September quarter, said growth came from the rebuilding of inventories by
businesses and from all categories of final sales except foreign trade.
Secretary Malcolm Baldrige said "we are seeing a normal, healthy
recovery" that is in no apparent danger of stalling or heating up inflation.
At the White House, spokesman Larry Speakes was even more upbeat,
saying the third-quarter figure "surpasses the peak quarter of production
before the recession. We have made up for what we lost, and reached a new
high in national economic output."
Army orders curfew in Grenada
BRIDGETOWN, Barbados - Scattered gunfire broke out in Grenada yes-
terday, a day after the army killed Prime Minister Maurice Bishop and top
leaders of his faction in a power struggle that ruptured the Marxist ruling:
party.
The army placed the island under 24-hour curfew and warned that
violators would be shot on sight.
In Washington, White House spokesman Larry Speakes said the turmoil on
the Caribbean island - where there are some 1,000 Americans, many of
them medical students - "has raised our concerns to the highest level."
State Department Officials, who spoke on condition they not be identified,
said "there are suspicions" but no evidence that Cuba mighthave played a
role in the upheaval.
The gunfire crackled in the early morning, said sources in Grenada's
capital of St. Georges, but no one ventured outdoors because the army led by
Gen. HudsonAustin threatened to shoot anyone judged to be disturbing the
peace.
McDonald's seeks liquor license
LOS ANGELES - The McDonald's Corp., the nation's fast-food giant, has
applied for a license to sell wine and beer at one of its California stores, the
first attempt in. the United States to put booze under the Golden Arches,
company officials said yesterday.
Spokesman Steve Leroy, from McDonald's headquarters in Oak Brook,
Ill., said the owner of the store in the Sierra resort community of Mammoth
applied earlier this month for a beear and wine license from the state.
Alcohol Control Board.
"Basically, the application was made in Mammoth because of the unique
demographics in the area," Leroy said.
"It's an adult recreation location and a large number of tourists are in the
area."'
But Leroy said there are no implications at this time" that the same ser-
vice might be offered at the chain's other 6,000 restaurants nationwide.
"There is no similar service in the McDonald's in the United States, but
outside the U.S. we hve served both beer and wine in our restaurants in
Germany and France since we began operations in those countries."
Company documents disclose
GM warned of faulty brakes
WASHINGTON - General Motors Corp. test drivers and internal company
documents repeatedly warned of brake locking problems on 1980 X-body
automobiles before the cars went into general production, according to GM
files made public yesterday.
The papers showed key GM executives were warned of the seriousness of
the problem just before production at a Dec. 10, 1978, meeting in Phoenix,
Ariz., that included GM President F.M. "Pete" Estes.
The documents were ordered unsealed by U.S. District Judge Thomas
Jackson, who is hearing a suit brought by the Justice Department, seeking a
recall of 1.1 million X-body cars.

The department also is asking that GM be ordered to pay $4 million in
damages, alleging the manufacturer failed to act on the braking problem
and later withheld informaton from federal officials.
Among the documents released were test-driver logs from 1978 that show
drivers in at least 35 cases complained of brakes locking and causing control
problems.
GM has denied the allegations, saying the company did not know about the
X-body brake problem before production. GM has said it will vigorously
defend itself against the suit.

F' owvl friendsDaily Photo by JEFF SCHRIER
This may be the last friendly gesture exchanged between the Iowa
Hawkeyes and the Michigan Wolverines before tomorrow's homecoming
football battle. University Activities Center members Maureen Devlin (left)
and Ian Price, both LSA freshpeople, were clad in feathers and fur yesterday
to promote homecoming weekend.

11
JUMP out of the 80's
into the 50' s
ALTERNATIVE CLOTHING FOR
MEN AND WOME
(Don't miss our Grand Opening P
and Sale Halloween Weekend
213 So. State 995-
(above Jason's)

Police
notes

EN

Party
jI)
9500

LAW SCHOOL CONVERSATIONS
WITH
Allan Stillwagon
U-M Law School Admissions Dean
SMALL GROUP DISCUSSIONS ON PREPARATION FOR LAW SCHOOL
LAW SCHOOL EXPECTATIONS AND HOW ADMISSIONS DECISIONS ARE MADE
TIME: 9 to 12 AND 1:30 to 4:30
(HOURLY DISCUSSIONS AT: 9, 10, 11 A.M. AND 1:30, 2:30, 3:30 P.M.)
PLACE: 312 HUTCHINS HALL
(LAW SCHOOL ADMISSIONS OFFICE)
DATES: OCTOBER 25, TUESDAY
OR
NOVEMBER 15, TUESDAY
OR
DECEMBER 7, WEDNESDAY
OR
JANUARY 11, WEDNESDAY
INTERESTED STUDENTS PLEASE SIGN UP FOR A TIME AND DATE.
SIGN UP LIST AVAILABLE IN 312 HUTCHINS HALL OR TELEPHONE 764-0537
Sponsored by: THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN LAW SCHOOL AND
PRE-PROFESSIONAL SERVICES OF CP&P

Rape charges filed
An Ann Arbor man, already in jail for
a previous incident, was charged
yesterday with two counts of rape and
robbery for a July 31 break-in. Kim
Miles, 28, was already in custody for
allegedly attempting to assault a clerk
in a Quick-Pic store on Ellsworth early
Aug.22.
Miles now is also charged with
breaking into the bedroom of a house
near the corner of Liberty and Virginia
Streets, robbing the man and woman
who lived there, and raping the woman.
Escapee in serious
condition
A suspect shot by Ann Arbor police
during a robbery at the Stadium
Boulevard Taco Bell Wednesday is
listed in serious condition at University
Hospital. Police say Daniel Frizzle, 26,
is an escaped prisoner from Ionia State
Prison near Lansing who had been ser-
ving a sentence for armed robbery.
Frizzle had escaped from prison once
before in 1978. Police say they do not
know how long Frizzle has been on the
run this time.
Stabbing suspect charged
Shannon Daniel Smith of Ypsilanti has
been charged with the Oct. 17 stabbing
of a 25-year-old Ann Arbor man outside
the Art Museum. According to Ann Ar-
bor Police Sgt. Harold Tinsey, Smith 27,
was charged with the stabbing after he
was arrested in Detroit earlier this
week for disorderly conduct. Bail has
been set at $25,000 and a pre-trial
hearing is scheduled for Oct. 26.
The stabbing victim's name and con-
dition have not been released.
Dooley's break-in
Burglars used a key to enter Dooley's
through a side door sometime between
2:15 and 6:00 Wednesday morning,
police say. They attempted to open a
safe, but were not successful.
- Matt Tucker
Correction
The top award in the LSA Student
Government essay contest is $200 for
the best papers in two categories. The
Daily reported an incorrect amount in
yesterday's Today column.
"BUDDHISM IN THE

Friday, October 21, 1983
Vol. XCI V-No. 39
(ISSN 0745-967X)
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