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October 08, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-08

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Saturday, October 8, 1983
Women shun USC 'sex pot'

IN BRIEF

A robot with sex appeal that makes a
great cup of coffee has been removed
from display at the University of
California at Berkeley.
The university decided that
Sweetheart the Robot, a five-foot-tall
coffee dispenser with "very large
breasts," is sexist.
"This is my idea of what a pretty
female robot should look like," sculptor
COLLEGES
Clayton Bailey said of his creation, one
of three robots he displayed last week
at a gala commemorating the 15th an-
niversary of the university's Lawren-
ce Hall of Science.
But three days later, the perky per-
colator was removed for the start of the
public celebration. "I was told that the
robot was deemed inappropriate,
grotesque, and sexist," Bailey said. "I
heard that some sort of feminist-radical
group had signed petitions demanding
that it not be shown."
After he complained, Bailey said,
Sweetheart was put back on display but
was removed again within an hour
because of "public reaction."
"The decision was mine alone," said
Robert Knox, deputy director of
Lawrence Hall. "Some people were
personally offended to think someone
would degrade womanhood by showing
a silent coffeepot with very large
breasts."
But Bailey, an art professor at Cal
State-Hayward who has long
specialized in comic art, said, "those
people have censored this, and this is

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not what a scientific teaching in-
stitution should be allowing to happen."
-The Associated Press
Pigeons plague Illinois
University of Illinois officials are in

hot water with local animal lovers over
some dead pigeons.
The Champaign County Humane
Society has begun an investigation into
the university's efforts to kill or
relocate the troublesome birds. School
officials say the pigeons are a nuisance

because they carry lice and disease and
leave unsightly feces on campus
buildings.
But a student last week complained
about the university's methods of
pigeon disposal when she saw two
workers take captured birds out of
wooden crates and stuff them into a
burlap sack.
Edward Cousins, associate director
of the university's Operation and main-
tenance division, said that workers are
instructed to capture the pigeons in the
crates. He said that while a few of the
birds are relocated, most are put to
sleep. -The Daily Illini
Minnesota tightens
aid requirments
It'll be tougher for students to declare
themselves financially independent in
Minnesota, according to a new state
statute.
The Minnesota Higher Education
Coordinating Board approved a rec-
commendation last week to allow only
students who are over 21 years old to
claim financial independence from
their parents. The regulation applies to
all students applying for state aid.
Exemptions in the ruling will be
made for married students, orphans,
wards of the state, students whose
parents cannot be located, and students
who have been physically abused by
their parents.
The board estimated that ap-
proximately 40 percent of those now
receiving financial aid as independent
students - nearly 2,800 sutdents in 1981-
82 - would no longer be eligible for
state assistance.
The new definition won't take effect
until the 1984-85 school year, but has
already drawn fire from students,
and financial aid officers.
-Minnesota Daily
OSU jaywalkers curbed
Jaywalking Ohio State University
students have lost their right-of-way on
the streets of Columbus.
The city's police force will be
cracking down on jaywalkers in an at-
tempt to decrease the number of
pedestrian-related accidents near the
university's campus.
A police survey had revealed that
jaywalkers caused between 10 and 20
accidents on campus each month.
Columbus police say the high number
of jaywalking accidents can be par-
tially attributed to the great number of
bars near campus. "The consequences
of mixing jaywalking and alcohol are
very serious," said Sgt. Charles Beele.
"Jaywalking is really just one
irresponsible moment," said, "but it
can cause pain and suffering for a lot of
people." -The Lantern
Colleges appears every Saturday
and is compiled by Daily staff writer
Halle Czechowski.

(turcb IIubrflIIP *rUIEcln

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Eastern won't seek bankruptcy
Eastern Airlines reached a truce with its unions yesterday, setting aside a
threat to go out of business, while Continental Airlines resumed bargaining
with pilots and flight attendants in hopes of ending a week-long strike.
Eastern chairman Frank Borman withdrew threats that the airline would
file for protection under the Federal Bankruptcy Act unless workers accep-
ted 15 percent pay cuts. But the airline and the unions agreed to set aside
their differences and have two independent analysts study the company's
financial structure.
Union leaders pledged to "do whatever is necessary" to keep Eastern in the
air.
Meanwhile, Continental Airlines - which two weeks ago filed for
reorganization under the Bankruptcy Act and resumed operations after
slashing schedules and salaries - expanded an ad campaign trying to lure
pilots to work while separate bargaining sessions with attendants and pilots
were held in Houston, said Continental spokesman Bruce Hicks.
Marcos battles econconije woes
MANILA, Philipines - President Ferdinand Marcos pledged a price freeze
and delayed an increase in the minimum wage to cushion the shock of a
currency devaluation yesterday. His opponents prepared to take their
political protests to Manila's slums despite a government ban.
Opposition leaders were refused a permit to hold a march and rally today
in the Tondo district, but said they would go ahead with their plans. Mean-
while, thousands demonstrated against Marcos in the Makati financial
district for the third successive day.
The sorely beset president crisis touched off by the assassination of op-
position leader Benigno Aquino on Aug. 21.
To combat price increases expected to result from the 21.4 percent
devaluation of the peso Wednesday, the government announced it would
freeze the prices of gasoline and such key commodities as rice, meat, eggs,
milk and school supplies.
Prime Minister Cesar Virata acknowledged at a new conference that the
unrest following the assassination of Aquino was contributing to the coun-
try's financial problems. But he said he did not think the government would
have to default on any of its $18 billion foreign debt.
French fighters head for Iraq
MORLAIX, France - Five French Super-Entendard jet fighters left a base in
western France yesterday for delivery to Iraq, informed sources reported.
Iran has warned that if France delivered the aircraft to its adversary in
the Iran-Iraq border war, it might blockade the Hormus Strait at the mouth
of the Gulf through which much of the world's oil is shipped.
The Iraqis are said to want the aircraft, which carry Exocet missiles
already sold to Iraq, to attach Iranian oil terminals.
The sources said the planes, piloted by French fliers, left the Landivision
naval air base in Brittany, on the northwest coast. They said Iraqi pilots
would take over the planes at a stopover in the Mediterranian area.
Suspect charged in murder
of young Redford's boyfriend
BOULDER, Colo. -- Thayne Smika, a prime suspect all along, was ordered
into court yesterday to face charges of killing his college roommate, the
longtime boyfriend of actor Robert Redford's daughter.
Smika, 24, an unemployed real estate agent, was arrested Thursday for
the slaying of University of Colorado student Sid Wells, roommate in a plush
condominium near the University of Colorado campus who dated Shauna
Redford for three years.
Prosecutors said Smika was the main suspect throughout the investigation
of the case, which was highly publicized nationwide because of the Redford
connection.
"rHe has been a suspect all along, and at this time he's a good supect,
said Lt. Bill Spotts. "Our investigation is continuing, but we don't anticipate
any more arrests."
Spotts refused to discuss a possible motive for the killing, saying all infor-
mation in the affidavit for an arrest warrent had been sealed by the court.
Star witness gets freedom
SEATTLE - Wai Chin, the lone survivor of a massacre that left 13 people
dead at a Chinatown gambling club, is getting his freedom after six months
in hiding and under guard.
The state's star witness at the trials of two men accused in the killings, the
61-year-old Chin becomes a free man this weekend, released by the convic-
tion of the second of the two men.
"It was like jail," said the woman who has lived with Chin for the past nine
years. He was closely guarded, with police his constant escort and guards
his neighbors across the hall. His actions were monitored by a camera and
motion detectors.
"You couldn't even throw the garbage out," the 54-year-old woman, who
identified herself only as Rose, told the Seattle Post-Intelligencer in a
copyrighted article. "I was fearful we'd have to move out again, so I
wouldn't even look out the window until the Ng trial was over."
Benjamin Ng, 20, was convicted of 13 counts of aggravated first-degree
murder and one count of first-degree assault in August, and sentenced to life
in prison. Willie Mak, 22, was convicted of the same charges Wednesday. On
Thursday he was sentenced to death.
Without Chin's testimony, prosecutors say, Ng and Mak might not have
been convicted.

4

I

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
FOUNDATION
502 East Huron, 663-9376
9:55 a.m. Sunday Worship October 9.
"Narrow Gates and Open Minds."
11:00 a.m. - Church School. Classes
for all ages. Class for undergraduates.
Class for graduates and young adults.
Also:
Choir Thursday 7:15 p.m., John Reed,
director; Janice Beck, organist.
Student theological discussion Thur-
sday 6:00 p.m.
(Call 761-6476 evenings for infor-
mation)
"Religion and Performing Arts"
group, next meeting-Oct. 9,7:30 p.m.
Weekly Student Dinner. Sunday 6
P.m.
Interim Pastor and Campus
Minister: Rev. T. J. Ging.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
663-5560
Sunday 9:15 & 10:30 Worship Service.
Sunday Morning 9:15 Bible Study.
Wednesday night 7:30 p.m. Bible
Study.
Thursday night
7:00-9:00 p.m. Concordia Seminary
representative here.
S7:30 Voice Choir
9:00 Bible Study
6 p.m. Sunday supper
* * *
GATHERED UNTO THE NAME OF
THE LORD JESUS CHRIST
For Doctrine, Fellowship, Breaking
of Bread, and Prayers
Washtenaw Independent Bible Chur-
ch meets at Clinton School, Ann Arbor,
Sunday 9:45 and 11:00 A.M.
For more information, call David
Nelson, 434-9734; or Van Parunak, 996-
1384.

NEW GRACE
APOSTOLIC CHURCH
632 N. Fourth Ave.
Rev. Avery Dumes Jr., Pastor

9:45 a.m. Sunday School
11:45 Morning Worship.
7:00 p.m. Evening Service.
Bible Study-Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.
For rides call 761-1530.
* *
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)

i

662-4536
October 9: "Love is Extravagant"-
by Dr. Donald B. Strobe.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11:00 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at 7:15
p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Rev. Tom Wachterhauser
Education Director:
Rose McLean
Broadcast Sundays 9:30a.m.- WNRS, 1290AM
Televised Mondays8: 00p.m. -Cable Chanel 9.
* * *
ST. MARY'S
STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic).
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Mon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
Thurs.-Fri.-12:10p.m.
Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-8:30 and 10:30 a.m. (Upstairs
and downstairs).
12 noon and 5 p.m. (Upstairs and
stairs).
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.m.
on Friday only; any other time by ap-
pointment.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., 6624466
(between S. University and Hill)
Campus/Career Fellowship
Coordinator: Steve Spina
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee Hour-10:30 social hall.
11:00 a.m. Issues Class, French
Room Wednesday p.m.
8:00 Christian Fellowship, French
Room.
8:30 - Study /Discussion Groups.
9:30 - Holy Communion, sanctuary.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the
Christian Reformed Church
Pastor: Reverend Don Postema
668-7421
Oct. 9: "Not Ashamed."
10 a.m. Morning Worship.
6 p.m. Evening Service.
"The Powerless Servant" (Compas-
sion II).
SPACE FOR GOD - Study and Prac-
tice of Spirituality and Prayer.
A course to be taught by Reverend
Postema.
Tuesday Evenings October 11 -
November 22 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. at Cam-
pus Chapel.
Cost for course is $7.00 and includes
course book.
Contact chapel if interested.
Wed. 10 p.m. Evening Prayers.
* * ,*
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
at Lord of Light
(LCA-ALC-AELC)
801 S. Forest at Hill St., 668-7622
Galen Hora, Pastor

I
4
4
4
4

Sunday worship 10:30 a.m.
Sunday 6 p.m. Student Supper.
Wednesday evenings:
Informal (half-hour) worship -
p.m.
Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Choir 7:30 p.m.

7

Argentine
author
arrested
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP)
The army put the general who
surrendered the Falkland Islands to the
British under disciplinary detention for
60 days Friday, apparently because he
did not get its permission for
publication of his story of the war.
. The arrest of Gen. Mario Menendez
may be the prelude to more serious
trouble for the military governor of the
offshore island archipelago during the
74-day conflict last year.
TWO WEEKS ago, a panel of retired
officers completed a nine-month in-
vestigation of the Argentine debacle.
News leaks indicated they recommen-
ded the court-martial of 14 officers, in-
cluding Menendez.
The general, who had been relieved of
military duties pending the outcome of
the investigation, was arrested at his
home before dawn. He was taken to the
Magdalena army base 60 miles south of
Buenos Aires to serve his sentence.
His mother, Hilda Villarino de
Menendez, and the official Telam news
agency said the arrest was due to the
recent publication of his account of the
war, "Malvinas, Testimony of Their
Governor."
The Malvinas is the Argentine name
for the disputed islands 250 miles off the
coast.
Police
notes
Gas station robbed

and
presents
SWEET DEA;LS FOR
E w.
Place a Sweetest Day ad in the Michigan Daily for your sweetheart
1& .wrnr n nelw ._0Iu i I (, nr z miith+ k n rAnniri

Saturday, October8, 1983
Vol. XCIV - No.28.
(ISSN 0745-967X)
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
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Editorin-chief...........
Managing Editor.
News Editor ......
Student Affairs Editor.
Features Editor.
Opinion Page Editors.
Arts Magazine Editors ...
Associate Arts Editor .....
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Associate Sports Editors ...

BARRY WITT
...JANET RAE
GEORGE ADAMS
....BETH ALLEN
FANNIE WEINSTEIN
DAVID SPAK
BILL SPINDLE
MARE HODGES
SUSAN MAKUCH
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LARRY MISHKIN
eRN POI I ACK

SPORTS STAFF: Jeff Bergida, Randy Berger, rKate
Blackwell. Joe Bower. Jim Davis, Joe Ewing. Jeff
Faye, Paul Helgren. Steve Hunter. Doug Levy. Tim
Makinen, Mike McGraw. Jeff Mohrenweiser, Rob
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Business Manager........... SAM G. SLAUGHTER IV
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A.s.ant C afes Mannne... ..JULIE SCHNEIDER

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