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September 08, 1983 - Image 47

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 8, 1983 - Page 15-B

Regents top off
'U' leadership

By BILL SPINDLE
Two days a month the University
Board of Regents meets. They arrive in
Ann Arbor from all over the state,
authorize construction on new multi-
million dollar projects, accept several
million dollars in gifts, and maybe raise
tuition ten or 15 percent.
Then they quietly disperse and drive
ck to their other jobs around the
state. Beyond that, they don't spend
much time on campus, and leave the
day-to-day University operation to ad-
ministrators.
THE UNIVERSITY Board of Regen-
ts, eight elected officials who in theory
run the University,has final authority
on any decision at the University.
They approve all faculty and ad-
ministrative appointments,
eliminations of schools and departmen-
Its, construction projects, and Univer-
sity investments. The Regents also ap-
prove each year's final budget before it
is implemented.
Although they reserve the final say
bn any University issue, the Regents of-
'ten find themselves somewhat isolated
from the University's decision making
process, and have long been accused of
being a rubber stamping body.
BECAUSE THEY are only on
campus a small fraction of

the time, they rely heavily on
an army of university ad-
ministrators, and committees to for-
mulate almost all of the proposals they
vote on.
Proposals that come before the
Regents go through months, sometimes
even years of bureaucratic channels.
Some of the more complex decisions go
from small faculty committees to the
full faculty Senate, then to low level
administrators, and finally through the
University executive officers before
they even get before the Regents.
THE REGENTS consider these
committees and administrators ad-
visory bodies, but an overwhelming
majority of the time they are forced to
accept the proposals put before them.
Working part time, they cannot
possibly do the in-depth studies that
administrators and the committees are
able to do. With only sketchy first-hand
knowledge and little time to double
check advisory studies, the Regents
usually accept the word of ad-
ministrators.
Ocassionally, however, the Regents
do take an issue into their own hands.
This summer a controversial set of
research guidelines went to the Regents
for adoption. The guidelines would have
See REGENTS, Page 19

THOMAS ROACH
One of the most prepared Regents at
the meetings, Roach usually under-
stands the fine details of proposals that
come before the board. He is a resident
of Saline.

21g
NELLIE VARNER
The most recent addition to the*
board, Varner became a Regent in 1981.
When she first joined she spoke out pr-
imarily on women's and minorities'
issues, but recently she has become
more vocal on all University issues.

JAMES WATERS
Waters rarely expresses his opinions
at the public board meetings, but is
more vocal in private discussions.
Along with Dunn, Waters was one of the
strongest proponents of divestment
from South Africa.

DEANE BAKER
Baker, 58, is the only Republican on the
board. He is one of the most outspoken
members, and often clashes with his
collegues. An Ann Arbor resident,
Baker operates a local construction and
real estate firm.

PAUL BROWN SARAH POWER
f the Power, 48, is especially vocal about
Brown, 48, graduated from thefwomen's and minorities' issues. She
University law school. A resident of worked in the Carter administration as
Petoskey, he is one of the quieter mem- deputy secretary of state for human
bers of the board. rights and social affairs.

ROBERT NEDERLANDER
Nederlander is a veteran board
member, having served for 15 years.
He has expressed particular concern in
the last year about the University's
obligations to the state's citizens and its
role in economic recovery.

GERALD DUNN
Dunn, 48, pushed some of the most
liberal views on the board last year. He
was the only Regent who voted for new
research guidelines and he advocated
complete divestment from South
Africa. He is a lobbyist for the state's
public schools.

MSA

S

members work behind the scenes

(Continued from Page 7 )

on enrollments. The president and vice
president of the assembly are chosen by
the whole student body (although only
about 4 percent vote each year).
ALTHOUGH MSA'S name does not
ppear on the posters advertising cam-
events, the assembly is behind
imany campus organizations. Last year
MSA gave almost $23,000 to 100 campus
organizations, helping to fund
speakers, conferences, films, and
social functions.

There are more than 400
organizations registered with MSA
which are eligible for funds or office
space in the student Union.
But only $1.10 of MSA's $4.25 fee goes
to the assembly for allocation or office
expenses. The rest of the fee is ear-'
marked for three other campus projec-
ts.
THE BULK OF the MSA fee supports
Student Legal Services, which curren-
tly receives $2.90 per student. Attorneys

in the office provide free legal counsel
to students.
Ten cents of the MSA fee goes to the
Ann Arbor Tenants Union, which
distributes housing information and
counsels landlord-tenant disputes.
The remaining 15 cents pays for the
assembly's ADVICE booklet, which
MSA publishes each term. The booklet
lists student's evaluations of instruc-
tors and professors for almost every
course offered.

MSA members hope to start a Student
Center for Educational Research and
Innovation this fall if the University
Regents approve a $1.50 fee hike to sup-
port the service.
The centerwould survey student
needs, counsel student groups, and
research current campus issues.
In addition, MSA asked the Regents
in July to approve 25 cent, yearly in-
creases for its fee over the next three
years. If approved, the fee would be
$4.50 this fall.
THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS
CALL 764-0557

5.8O a week student aid!

The Detroit Free Press, Michigan's best
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Bored in Business Administration (get ex-
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Positively lost in Political Science (find
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In fact, the morning Free Press will turn
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Counseling

helps

break

(Continued from Page 12)
sticn as a suicide attempt, it is usually
better for the student to get more inten-
sive treatment, Korn says.
The University Counseling Center
and the Psychology Clinic on Huron
Street also offer students therapy for
reduced fees. In many cases, a
student's insurance will cover the costs
of therapy.
Counseling services keeps all records
and information strictly confidential.
tudent records are considered part of

the counselors' personal files.
There are danger signs to watch for
which may indicate you should consider
counseling:
" prolonged depression;
" loss of interest in things you usually
find pleasure in;
* acting in self-threatening ways,
such as excessive drinking;
" staying away from friends or with-
drawing;
" loss of appetite and
* rapid mood changes.
If you notice these symptoms in

'U' pressures
friends or a roommate, counseling ser-
vices can help you determine if the
changes could be a warning of a more
serious problern, Gauthier says.
"Coming here, you think you are
coming to a place where others are
striving for the same things you are and
soon you begin to wonder," said
Derrick.
"To so many people, their only
priority is to get a degree and get a good
job. There is no unity at the Univer-
sity."

V NTE
VOLUNTEERS to build
brighter future- Join org
that grows because
No causeof You.
No exp. needed.Work
n campus, in Communitt
iy.
if you enynU r i
line Subp y ingunder n
,. f%, r

O \\\\\

i +

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epar,\
9Sur
evi'

Join
PI RGI1M
where students make the difference
PIRGIM (Public Interest Research Group in Michigan) is students and our staff of
professionals working together to improve the quality of our environment, our society,
our lives. Student-founded, run, and funded, the organization is a resource for learning,
;experience, and being heard. PIRGIM's past victories include:
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