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October 07, 1983 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-07

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The DAILY'S
PHONE NUMBERS:
Billing 764-0550
Circulation 764-0558
Clossifieds 764-0557
Display 764-0554.
News & Happenings
764-0552
Sports 764-0562

Page 2- The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 7, 1983

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
CIA may have supplied planes
used in Nicaraguan bombings
WASHINGON - The Central Intelligence Agency provided anti-Sang;
dinista rebels with at least one of the planes used in bombing raids insid:
Nicaragua last month, intelligence sources say.
Three U.S. intelligence sources who confirmed the existence of U.S. aid to
Pastora spoke on condition they not be identified.
One source said it was a CIA-supplied plane, piloted by two Nicaraguan
rebels, that crashed at the base of the control tower at Managua's intex-,
national airport during a Sept. 8 bombing raid. Another source said the CIA I
has provided five light planes to the Costa Rican-based forces of former
Sandinista hero Eden Pastora, who claimed responsibility for the airport
raid.
Although CIA "covert" support for Honduran-based Nicaraguan counted-,
revolutionaries has been known for months, Pastora's source of arms and,
money has remained shrouded in secrecy. Pastora, who broke with the San-
dinista government 18 months ago; has repeatedly refused to say where die
gets his support.
Bomb kills Moslem commander
BEIRUT, Lebanon - A car bomb killed a pro-Israeli Moslem militia'
commander in southern Lebanon yesterday in an attack the Palestine'%
Liberation Organization said was carried out to eliminate traitors to the
Arabcause.
The car bomb explosion at Adloun, 30 miles south of Beirut in Israeli-
controlled Lebanon, killed Hussein Wahbe, commander of the Israeli-
sponsored national guard in the region. State-run Beirut radio said. Wahbe's
wife was wounded in the attack.
The attack in the Shiite Moslem village of Aldoun came as negotiators in
Beirut said there could be a 10 to 12 day delay in convening peace talks bet-
ween Lebanon's Christian and Moslem factions.
The 11-day cease-fire between the warring factions held through the day
despite reports of sniper fire in South Beirut where the Lebanese,
army is deployed close to Shiite Moslem militia units.
Economic unrest spurs new
demonstrations in Phillipines

Daily Photos by RENEE FREIERI

Abandoned
A lonely bicycle reclines against an old cider mill in Dexter.

Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

Golding wins Nobel Prize

NL A R G E
ENLARGE

!

ENLARGE
ENLARGE

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(Continued from Page 1)
does it almost mechanically."
One judge denounced the choice in an
unprecedented attack on the British
author. Arthur Lundkvist, one of 17
judges of Swedish Academy, described
Golding as "a small English
phenomenon of no great interest" and
claimed other Academy members kept
him out of the decision-making process.
Lars Gyllensten, chairman of the
Nobel Committee, said there were no
irregularities in the choice of Golding.
He said there was "a large majority
supporting this year's prize-winner and
there was absolutely no cause for a

misunderstanding."
"Golding has, like many other can-
didates, been considered for many
years," Gyllensten said. "The impact
of his work has consistenly increased
after every novel was published."
Golding is the eighth British writer to
win the Nobel literature prize, one of six
awards named for Alfred Nobel, the
Swedish millionaire inventor of
dynamite.
The award came a day after the Nobel
Peace Prize was awarded to Lech
Walesa, leader of Poland's banned
Solidarity trade union.

540 E. Liberty St. 761=4539
Corner of Maynard & Liberty

MANILA, Philippines - The prospect of price increases and labor unrest
added to President Ferdinand Marcos' troubles yesterday as his political
opponents led thousands in another noisy demonstration demanding his
resignation.
A new round of price hikes was expected following a 21.4 percent
devaluation of the currency Wednesday, and Labor Minister Blas Ople
acknowledged, "there will probably be some strains on industrial peace."
"We must accept that we are in a difficult situation and that there's a
possibility it will worsen a little bit more," Marcos told the nation in another
of his almost-daily television appearances.
He asked the plublic to remain calm, appealed to businessmen not to raise
prices suddenly, and said, "the present situation can be turned around."
Meanwhile, leaders of 22,000 striking Filipino workers at U.S. military
bases agreed to end a fout-day-old wage walkout. Government officials said
the U.S. authorities agreed to renegotiate wage scales.
Rear Adm. Dickinson Smith, the commander of U.S. forces in the Philip-
pines, conceded that the strike disrupted the routine, but he said that
American military and civilian personnel and their families cooked meals
and waited on tables, a few personnel were flown from Guam to help out, and
"we were able to function very well."
Officials deny Watt will resign
WASHINGTON - Senate passage of a resolution calling for Interior
Secretary James Watt's resignation would not change President Reagan's
opinion that Watt should remain in the Cabinet, a White House spokesman
said yesterday.
One administration official, who spoke on condition that he not be named,
said Watt probably will step down in the next two weeks, in light of what looms
as a lopsided margin against him in the Republican-controlled Senate.
"Rather than be repudiated in a Senate vote, he will resign," the source
said.
Deputy White House press secretary Larry Speakes, meanwhile, insisted
that Watt has not been asked to resign. But Speakes refused to say whether
Watt is still an effective Cabinet member.
"As far as the White House is concerned, the case is closed," Speakes said,
repeating a statement he made last week. Speakes said he had spoken to
Reagan before making the statement.
Cardinal Cooke dies of leukena
NEW YORK - Cardinal Terence Cooke, spiritual leader of nearly 4
million Roman Catholics and American head of the church's anti-abortion
battle, died yesterday of leukemia in the shadow of his beloved St. Patrick's
Cathedral.
The 62-year-old cardinal, who had been archbishop of New York for 15
years, died 41 days after it was announced he was terminally ill and two days
after he suffered a serious setback.
Cooke, confined to his official residence behind the cathedral, was
spiritual leader of 1.8 million Catholics in the archdiocese.
Cooke was the American leader of the church's fight against abortion,
pressing for legislation to 4ban the practice and serving for 10 years as
chairman of the National Conference of Catholic Bishop's Committee for
Pro-Life Activities.

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Vol. XCIV - No. 27
Friday, October 7, 1983
(ISSN 0745-967X)
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $15.50 September through April (2 semesters); $19.50 by
mail outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day mornings. Subscription rates: $8 in Ann Arbor; $10 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syn-
dicate and Field Enterprises Newspaper Syndicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY; Sports desk, 763-0376; Circulation,
764-0558; Classified Advertising, 764-0557; Display Advertising, 764-0554;
Billing, 764-0550.e
,....... .- - 11 11 _-:a 0 -4 Rev~o. Kn i.

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Editor-in-chief BARRY WITT
Managing Editor E.. .. JANET RAE
News Editor ............ GEORGE ADAMS
Student Affairs Editor BETH ALLEN
Features Editor FANNIE WEINSTEIN
Opinion Page Editors ...DAVID SPAK
BILL SPINDLE
Arts Magazine Editors..............MARE HODGES
SUSAN MAKUCH
Associate Arts Editor ................. JAMES BOYD
Sports Editor . . ....JOHN KERR

SPORTS STAFF: Jeff Bergida. Randy Berger. Katie
Blackwell. Joe Bower. Jim Davis. Joe Ewing. Jeff
Faye. Paul Helgren. Steve Hunter. Doug Levy. Tim
Makinen, Mike McGraw. Jeff Mohrenweiser, Rob
Pollard. Dan Price. Mike Redstone. Paula Schipper
John Tayer. Steve Wise
Business Manager........... SAM G. SLAUGHTER IV
Operations Manager .......LAURIE ICZKOVITZ
Sales Manager.. . MEG GIBSON
Classified Manager ... ..... PAM GILLERY
Display Manager. ....... ... ....JEFF VOIGT
Finance Manager. .. ....... JOSEPH TRULIK

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