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October 01, 1983 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-01

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4

Page 6 - The Michigan Daily - Saturday, October 1, 1983

Economic indicators show decline

WASHINGTON (UPI) - The leading economic
indicators sagged 0.1 percent in August, the first
K decline in a year of the recovery's vigor, the Com-
rerce Department reported yesterday.
The dip followed a revised 0.8 percent increase in
July and even stronger gains in the other months sin-
ce January when the government's economic trend
detector hit its 1988 peak growth of 3.1 percent.
SOME ANALYSTS suggested the drop was
spmething of a fluke, however, reflecting the late
simmer's temporary economic doldrums more than
ny fundamental loss of economic vigor. The en-
iturAnce of the economic recovery still depends on
Onsumers whose enthusiasm seemed to be returning

in September, they said.
Commerce Secretary Malcolm Baldrige predicted
the August index "may be revised upward" later
because data not yet available could show businesses
restocking their shelves and warehouses. The index
"is consistent with a lower and more sustainable rate
of economic growth," he said.
"It's just a one-month fluke because the economy,
staged an amazing turnaround in September,'
economist Michael Evans of Evans Economics said.
DEPUTY WHITE House Press secretary Larry
Speakes told reporters the indicators, seen in the con-
text of low inflation and high growth in the gross
national product, "are forecasting a path of slow,
steady growth, and that's the course we want to be

on."
An indicator measuring formation of new
business was the biggest loser among the four
negative trends dominant in the report.
ALSO CONTRIBUTING to the slight decline were a
slackening in building permits, a lack of strong
growth in the average of 500 common stock prices
and a slight worsening of the weekly initial claims for
state unemployment benefits.
Not available for the August report were two other
indicators showing the change in inventories on hand
and changes in business and consumer credit.
The last decline of the index, in August 1982, was an
identical 0.1 percent drop.

(Cont
Agave to break
a'"U-Club i
organization,'
Student Servic
the executive
sible for the 1
nover; they
operation."
happy hour'
nights a week
U-Club) will
ter," Johnson
The losses a
ttributed tc
perishables"1
trabb said.
naive, but I th
here are top cz
NEW CON
systems shou
the spoiling of
$40,000 comps
trols the dis
"already pai
:eliminating o
strong drinks.
Crabb also
union wages1
*University ru
be bought thr

Deficits grow while
inued from Page 1)
even to be worthwhile. tral purchasing agent. U-C
is not a break-even Some students who have worked in con
" said Vice President for Union offices say that the officials don't stu
ces Henry Johnson, who is care how much the Union-whose bui
officer directly respon- budget increased 64 percent in just this for;
Union. "There is no tur- year-loses because student fees are R
're a one-meal-a-day always around to pay for them. wa
Despite the addition of "THE UNION is like a Un
" and entertainment six hemorrhage-a broken blood vessel not
C, "I doubt seriously (the with blood just pouring out of it," said stu
be a profit-making cen- Richard Layman, an LSA senior who ren
said. has worked with the Michigan Student ceo
t the U-Club can be better Assembly for several years. MSA has a U
o "mismanagement of large office space on the Union's third We
than to "student rip-off," floor. rev
"I don't want to appear Larry Bram, a member of the Union bee
ink the students that work Board of Representatives and director neg
aliber," he said. of Eclipse Jazz, which also has Union lea
TROLS and purchasing office space, says he supports the an
ld reduce the loss due to renovations, with one exception. U
food, he said. And a new "There is a physical renovation, but loc
uterized bar, which con- there's also an evolution in attitudes. and
pensing of alcohol, has What students don't realize is that ha
d for itself" in terms of they're paying for it," said Bram, an A
)sses from free or overly LSA senior. foo
MSA PRESIDENT Mary Rowland sta
attributes losses to high said she was concerned that the new
for his employees and a changes that have been made at the U- bu
le which requires food to Club are aimed more at administrators'V
ough the University's cen- and faculty, rather than students. One foo

Union renovates

Club employee echoed Rowland's
ncerns: Union officials are moving
udents "into the bowels of the
ilding," while leaving the upstairs
faculty and alumni, she said.
Rowland also said that although she
s unsure of any mismanagement by
ion officials, she hoped "that there's
t waste in expenditures, because with
udent fees (supporting the
novation), there's an unlimited sour-
of funds."
University Cellar manager Bruce
inberg said that the loss of bookstore
venues is Cianciola's own fault
cause he refused to bend in
gotiations. "With the terms of the
se we were given, I don't know
yone who'd take it," Weinberg said.
U-CELLAR IS paying $6.50 at its
ation at the corner of South Division
d Liberty, $2.77 less than Cianciola
d asked for the Union space.
ks for the Union's future, Crabb, the
d service director, says the new food
nds have shown great promise. The
w delicatessen "does almost as much
siness as U-Club," he said.
Variety, the last of the specialty

Still to be completed downstairs is a
mini-mall, which will bring outside
retailers into the Union beginning in
1984. Union Director Cianciola said he
has not negotiated with any prospective
occupants yet, but he said he is looking
for stores that will cater to the needs of
students to fill the seven or eight
spaces.
The variety of shops will make the
Union "not as dependent on one kind of
operation," as it was when the U-Cellar
was there, Cianciola said.
Read
and
Use
Daily
Classifieds

Shapely
Students form various geometrical shapes as they snooze, snack and sketch
in the courtyard of the Arts and Architecture Building on North Campus.

14

Tenants union closed

(Continued from Page 1)
of the AATU offices in the Union.
The tenants union began to cut back
almost a year ago when its director,
Dale Cohen, left after the group could
no longer afford to pay his salary.
Since then, Delp has coordinated the
office while being paid only a part-time
salary. While Delp said the number of
donating members has remained
"basically stable," the number of
volunteers has dropped significantly
over the years.
THE organization currently boasts
"seven or eight" working members,
compared to about 30 last year, Consani
said.
AATU has yet to receive its funds
from MSA, according to MSA
President Mary Rowland.
ROWLAND SAID that when she for-
mulated MSA's funding proposal to
'present to the University regents in
July, Delp said the money allocated to
the tenants union would be used for
running workshops.
But the workshops have yet to
materialize, and Rowland said that if
AATU does not begin "some kind of,
programming" they will not receive
their funds.
"I don't want to give the money back
to the students," Rowland said. "But if
they have no programming, MSA can't
keep that money."

Rowland said she felt the tenants
union lacked volunteers because
students are no longer concerned with
tenant's rights.
"THE HIGH vacancy rate has
resulted in students getting mor4
rights," she said. "Also, students are
wealthier now and can afford to pay
high rent."
Rowland said she was dismayed
because the tenant's union has lost con-
tact with MSA, always a strong
proponent of AATU. Rowland did not
meet the president of the organization
until yesterday.
"I didn't know yho the hell she was,"
said Rowland. "I was shocked to have
her walk into the office and introduc4
herself."
THE TENANTS Union has financial
problems on top of their shortage of
funds. An escrow account from a ren-
ters strike, "years ago," is still in its
possession, said Delp.
The escrow accounts were opened
when the tenants union held security
deposits or rents while negotiating lan-
dlord-tenant disputes. Because of the
time involved in the cases, the group
lost track of some of the renters and has
not returned the money.
Delp said it was unclear how AATU
would deal with the account, or which
organization members are responsible
for handling the money.

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