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September 16, 1983 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-16

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' The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 16, 1983 - Page 3
Begin resigns, Shamir
expected to take over

JERUSALEM (AP) - Prime
Minister Menachem Begin, whose
peace with Egypt changed the course of
Middle East history, formally resigned
yesterday after six turbulent years as
leader of Israel. The ailing and
dispirited Begin stepped down 15 mon-
ths after he led the Jewish state into a
divisive invasion of Lebanon.
Begin, 70, remained secluded at his
residence while his resignation letter
was delivered to President Chaim Her-
zog, clearing the way for Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir's probable
takeover as Israel's next prime
minister.
THE RESIGNATION ended 18 days
of uncertainty and set machinery in
motion for the transition from Begin, a
guerrilla fighter who rose to Israel's
highest office in 1977.
But the glory days of the 1979 treaty
with Egypt faded with a Lebanese in-
vasion that left the Israeli army bogged
down. The death of his wife last year
and continuing Israeli casualties in
Lebanon left him despondent. He was
no longer able to carry on in the face of
the worsening economic situation,
political bickering in his coalition
government and his persistent health
problems.
His departure was a melancholy af-
fair dogged by reports that he was ill
and unable to function as leader of the
government. Departing from custom,
Begin declined to deliver his
resignation himself, and sent Cabinet
Secretary Dan Meridor to deliver the
two-line typewritten letter to Herzog.
"MR. PRESIDENT," Begin wrote,
"according to section 23 a of the Basic
Law: the Government, I hereby submit
my resignation from the office of prime
minister."

Herzog said he would open con-
sultations soon to choose the man "who
enjoys the support of the majority in the
Knesset Parliament and to authorize
him to form a Cabinet."
After consulting with Israel's
political parties starting next week,
Herzog was seen almost certain to
choose Shamir, a 68-year-old comrade
of Begin from the days when they
fought together for Israeli independen-
ce.
BEGIN HAD delayed his formal
resignation until Shamir was assured of
a parliamentary majority. But his
moves were apparently hastened by a
legal opinion from Attorney General
Yitzhak Zamir that if Begin delayed
much longer, it might render
inoperative his party's efforts for a
smooth succession.
Shamir was elected by his party after
Begin announced Aug. 28 that he was
resigning. Shamir has since won the
backing of the six parties in the
outgoing coalition.
The official reason given for Begin's
seclusion was a skin ailment which
prevented him from shaving. His aides
strongly denied he was seriously ill, and
Meridor said he remains prime

minister until a new government takes
over.
BY LAW, Begin is now caretaker
prime minister with full policy-making!
powers. Confusion arose when Deputy
Prime Minister David Levy said in a
television interview Wednesday that
Begin's absence meant the powers of
prime minister had been transferred to
him.
But Justice Minister Moshe Nissim
denied this. The law states that a prime
minister remains in office unless he
delegates his powers to a replacement.
If he is incapacitated, the Cabinet can
choose a temporary replacement.
Nissim said neither case applied.
BEGIN'S SIX years in office drew to
its end in an ugly quarrel between the
news media and Begin's aides over his
personal condition.
The once-combative leader had ap-
peared wan and introverted for months,
and was said to be despondent over his
wife's death last November and Israel's
rising casualty toll in Lebanon.
Yoel Marcus, the respected political
columnist of the daily Haaretz, wrote in
a front-page story yesterday that Begin
was so depressed he no longer took care
of his health.

Anchors away!
Crew members of the Liberty, the American entry in the America's Cup race wave victoriously on their way back into
Newport. They beat the Australia II in yesterday's race.
City teachers break off talks

NURSES:

By BARBARA MISLE
Formal talks between Ann Arbor
teachers and local school board of-
ficials broke off abruptly yesterday
morning, sending the strike into its ten-
th day and keeping students out of
"school.
Negotiations ended after teachers
rejected the board's latest proposal to
transfer teachers' insurance coverage
to a less-expensive plan.
THE BOARD offered teachers a
revised program for giving up their
policies with the Michigan Educational
Special Services Administration
(MESSA) over the next threeyears.
Board officials originally asked the
teachers to drop MESSA immediately in
favor of a cheaper system which in-
cludes deductible payments.
But teachers said they would not give
up their MESSA coverage according to
Merton Campbell, spokesman for the
Ann Arbor Education Association, the
teachers' union.
"THE BOARD has basically not
Imoved from its position to get rid of
MESSA," Campbell said. "Allowing

MESSA to continue only to ultimately
take it away from us is the same."
Campbell said the teachers will
''remain firm'' in their demands.
Underthe latest proposal, teachers
would keep the MESSA plan this year
while the board found a comparable but
less expensive policy for the following
year.
TEACHERS would then have the
option of taking the new policy plus a
$250 deductible or keeping MESSA fully
paid for one year.
During the third year, teachers who
elect to keep MESSA would have to pay
the price difference between the two
plans.
Teachers also rejected the proposal
because it omitted references to other
disputed issues such as wage increases
and lay-off criteria, Campbell said.
BOARD officials said teachers are
being inflexible because they won't
consider alternative insurance policies.
Rejecting the proposal "points out
the fact that regardless of what (the
board) offers, they want to keep
MESSA or not come back to work."
said Robert Moseley, assistant school

superintendent.
Meanwhile, the start of school for
14,000 students has been delayed for the
ninth day.
Campbell said no settlement is expec-
ted before this weekend at the earliest.

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REPRESENTATIVE

DOM

I.

-HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
Canterbury Loft continues its Starving Artists Sale today. Original pain-
tings, photographs, drawings, and prints are priced at $15 or less at the sale,
which will be held from noon to 6 p.m. at Canterbury Loft, 332 S. State.
Films
Cinema II - The Year of Living Dangerously, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Alternative Action - The Shining, 7 & 9:30 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
AAFC - An Officer and a Gentleman, 7 & 9:30 p.m., MLB 3.
CFT - Play it Again, Sam, 5:30 & 9 p.m., Casablanca, 7:05 & 10:35 p.m.,
Michigan Theater.
Cinema Guild - The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, 7 & 9 p.m., Lorch.
Performances
Opportunity Program: Minority Student Services - Hispanic theater per-
formance, "Grupo Teatral Jose Alfaro," 7:30 p.m., Union Ballroom. Dance
featuring all-Latino dance band, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Ark - Lou and Peter Berryman, 8 p.m., 1421 Hill.
Speakers
Guild House - James Crowfoot, "The Challenges of Down-Sizing the
University," noon, 802 Monroe.
Engineering - J.P.M. Schalkwijk, Eindhoren University of Technology,
"Cooling for Two-Way Channels & A Conjectured Capacity Region for the
Binary Multiplying Channel," 3 p.m., 4226 E. Engin.
Meetings
Korean Christian Fellowship - Bible study meeting, 9 p.m., Campus
Chapel.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class, 7:30 p.m., University Reformed Church.
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship - Fellowship and Bible study, 7:30
p.m., Memorial Christian Church, 730 Tappan.
Regents - 9 a.m., Regents Room, Fleming Administration Bldg.
Miscellaneous
Duplicate Bridge Club - Open game, 7:15 p.m., League.
Tae Kwon Do Club - Martial arts demonstration with Master Hwa Chong,
7-8 p.m., CCRB Activities Rm.
University Musical Society - Choral Union auditions, call 665-3717 for ap-
pointment.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.
iA A-- ti ---- A -

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