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April 16, 1983 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Budget panel approves
cut for education school

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, April 16, 1983-Page 5
Teamsters chie
says he'll resign

(Continued from Page 1)
other jobs "where they have more sup-
port and security."
"WE HAVE several (professors) who
are looking, a few that have offers. But
they might be the faculty we want to
have. That decision should be more
than an accident."
One of the dean's primary complaints
with the plan is that it takes away the
*gree-granting power of the faculty.
"It removes most of the degrees from
the School of Education and offers them
in other schools," she said. "The only
thing they would leave us to offer, is a
Master's degree."

SHE ALSO said that the committee
had overstepped its boundaries by dic-
tating the curriculum for the school.
"The committee, none of whom are
experts in education, have essentially
designed the program for us," Stark
said. "It is like if I went into the
medical school and designed their
programs. (The plan) does not respect
the professional experience and exper-
tise of the faculty.
The eight-member review subcom-
mittee issued its original report in late
February. Details from that report
received wide publicity and reaction.
The subcommittee had no un-

dergraduate student representative for
the final six months of its 12-month
review. The original undergraduate
resigned last September, and the
Michigan Student Assembly did not find
a replacement, the report said.
The plan now goes to the executive of-
ficers for their review. An open hearing
on the report will be held from 7 to 10
p.m. on April 20 in Auditorium A of
Angell Hall.
Two other schools - art and natural
resources - that were reviewed at the
same time as the School of Education
face budget cuts of about 25 percent
each.

From AP and UPI
CHICAGO-Teamsters President
Roy Williams promised to resign his
union post yesterday and a judge freed
him while he appeals his bribery con-
spiracy conviction.
U.S. District Judge Prentice Mar-
shall signed a court order freeing the
ailing president of the nation's largest
union on his own recognizance
providing he has no involvement with
the Teamsters before his resignation is
effective next Wednesday.
Williams, 67, had been ordered to
surrender yesterday at the federal
prison hospital in Springfield, Mo., for a

90-day medical examination. He was
hospitalized for a flareup of chronic
emphysema Tuesday, but was released
yesterday from Park Lane Medical
Center in Kansas City.
The government had sought an im-
mediate resignation, but defense attor-
ney Raymond Larroca asked for the
added time so Williams could step
down at a Teamsters executive board
meeting next Tuesday in Scottsdale,
Ariz.
"There is no real danger," Larroca
said, adding that Williams wanted "to
say goodbye to his friends and leave
with a minimum of dignity" after being
a union member for 45 years.

Williams
... appealing bribery conviction

- _

$I

M an on the Street Daily Photo by DAVID FRANKEL
LSA senior David LaRue is interviewed on North University yesterday by Cable News Network correspondent Bob
Vito. CNN was in town to cover the Regents' decision Thursday to divest from South African companies.
500 march to 'take back the night'

a

(Continued from Page 1)
fear of rape acts as a curfew for
women, limiting their activities after
dark. It is emphasized that women
should be able to rely on themselves
and on each other, not male
chaperones, for safety.
"WE ARE doing it to allow women to
voice their rage ... to make them feel
powerful," said Ellen Fabes, one of the
ally organizers.
It was for this reason that men were
asked not to march, although their par-
ticipation at the rally and dance after-
wards was welcomed. It was stressed
at the rally that this was not meant to
discriminate against men and the only
male speaker, Ann Arbor City Coun-
cilman Lowell Peterson, strongly
agreed. So did other men at the rally.
"The point of the rally and the march
sthe statement of the strength and
nity of women. For men to go
chaperoning and 'protecting' the
women tonight undermines the purpose
of this whole event. I support their
stand whole-heartedly and am proud of
my friends that are marching," said
James Boyer, a junior at Wayne State
University who came into Ann Arbor
for the rally.
- Many students aren't aware of the
extent of rape that occurs, nor even of
the threat, organizers said. "The
'University hasn't taken enough respon-
sibility in informing students," said
Susan McGee, a coalition member. Cer-

tain safety measures could be im-
plemented. For example, there should
be "more sensitivity on the part of the
University for not having night exams
for day classes," said McGee.
AMONG THE current goals of the
coalition are the establishment of rape
prevention workshops at student orien-
tations and the training of resident ad-
visors, administrators, and security
guards in rape prevention and victim
assistance.
Past achievements have been the

adoption of an all-night public transpor-
tation service, printing of a spot map
showing high risk rape areas, and a city
ordinance requiring landlords to put
bolt locks on their housing.

If you have Used Books
to Sell-Read This!

i
,I' Ii !I O

Sheer vocal elegance effortlessly and flaw-
lessly applied to Mozart, Handel, Debussy,
Porter, Manilow, Gershwin, Kern ...
liU ccw w \n/ e QX3rngcr
Thursday, April 21, 1983, 8:00 p.m.
ORCHESTRA HALL E Woodward at Parsons ' Detroit

As the Semester end approaches-bringing with it a period of heavy
book selling by students-ULRICH'S would like to review with you their
BUY-BACK POLICY.
Used books fall into several categories, each of which-because of the
law of supply and-demand-has its own price tag. Let's explore these
various categories for your guidance.
CLASS I. CLOTHBOUND
A textbook of current copyright-used on our campus-and which the
Teaching Department involved has approved for re-use in upcoming
semesters-has the highest market value. If ULRICH'S needs copies
of this book we will offer a minimum of 50% off the list price for copies
in good physical condition. When we have sufficient stock of a title
for the coming semester, URLICH'S will offer a "WHOLESALE PRICE"
which will be explained later in this article. (THIS IS ONE REASON
FOR SELLING ALL YOUR USED BOOKS as soon as you are finished
with them!)
CLASS II. PAPERBOUND
Paperback are classified in two groups:. A. Text paperbacks; B. Trade
Paperbacks.
A. Text Paperbacks will be purchased from you as Class I books
above.
B. Trade Paperbacks would draw an approximate offer of 25% of the
list price when in excellent condition.
CLASS Ill.
Some of the above Class I or Class 11 books will be offered which have
torn bindings, loose pages, large amounts of highlighting and under-
lining, or other physical defects. These will be priced down according
to the estimated cost of repair or saleability.
CLASS IV.
Earh emester various professors decide to change text for a Given

i N' v
I y i iHt i '
n
..;
'

All seats reserved.
call 271-4360
Brethren Productions

.,..$15, $1 2, $9, $6
or 833-3700
Orchestra Hall

ij
b 1:4

HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF POSITIONS
FOR 1983-84 ACADEMIC YEAR

POSITIONS INCLUDE:

6 RESIDENT ADVISORS ON MALE CORRIDORS - BURSLEY

4 RESIDENT ADVISORS ON FEMALE CORRIDORS - BURSLEY
1 RESIDENT ADVISOR ON MALE CORRIDOR - COUZENS
1 RESIDENT DIRECTOR - SOUTH QUAD
1 RESIDENT ADVISOR ON MALE CORRIDOR - SOUTH QUAD
1 MINORITY PEER ADVISOR IN EASE QUAD ON A
FEMALE CORRIDOR
*4 RESIDENT FELLOWS ON COED CORRIDORS - PILOT PROGRAM
ALICE LLOYD
The above resident staff positions are available for the 1983-84 academic year.
Interested individuals who have an updated application on file may call the Housing
Office (763-3161) and request that their application be forwarded to the appropriate
buildings. New applicants may pick up an application, job description, etc., in the
Housing Office, 1500 Student Activities Building from 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon and from
12:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m., Thursday, April 14 through Thursday, April 21, 1983.
QUAlIFICATIONS: Undergraduates must have completed a minimum of 48 undergraduate credit
hours toward program and must have at least a 2.50 cumulative grade point average at
the end of the 1983 Spring Term. Graduate students must be in good academic standing in
the School or College in which they are enrolled by the end of the 1983 Spring Term.

Course. These decisons on change of textbooks are made in echelons
of THINKING AND AUTHORITY far above the level of your local book retailers, AND ULRICH'S
HAS NO PART IN THE DECISION. (Quite often we have MANY copies of the old title which
you have only ONE.)
However, ULRICH'S does enter the picture by having connections with other bookstores
throughout the country. We advertise these discontinued books and sell many of them at schools
where they are still being used. ULRICH'S dres this as a service to you and pays you the best
possible "WHOLESALE PRICE" when you sell them to us with your currently used books.
CLASS V.
Authors and publishers frequently bring out new editions. When we "get caught" with an old
edition, let's accept the fact that it has no value on the wholesale market, and put it on the shelf
as a reference book.
You will find that you come out best in the long run when you sell ALL your books to ULRICH'S.

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