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April 14, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-04-14

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Page 2-Thursday, April 14, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Tech fair heralds
wave of the future

By JIM SPARKS
The University will offer a glimpse
into the high-tech future Saturday and
Sunday when the Michigan Technology
Fair rolls into town.
The technological forefront will be
featured in 133 exhibits ranging from
robotics and molecular genetics to
computers. The University will have 25
displays.
AFTER A heavy ad campaign,
William Ince, president of the Michigan
Technology Council, which is spon-
soring the event, said he expects 20,000
people to turn out. The 1981 fair drew
10,500 people.
Ince said he hopes the Fair will get the
word out about Michigan's growing

high-tech efforts, let business and in-
ventors mix and mingle, and interest
students in pursuing technology-related
fields.
Although high technology is the
thrust of the conference, Ince said the
impact of past innovations will also be
explored.
The "Eureka" display, for example,
treats such, mundane but definitely
vital inventions as ice cream cones,
zippers, and windshield wipers.
the fair will be open Saturday from 10
a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from noon to
6 p.m. atthe Track and Tennis
Building, 1150 South State St. Tickets
are $2 and will be available at the door.
Students can get in for $1.

33 students earn Hopwoods

(Continued from Page 1)
graduate students.
THEY CAN all compete in this con-
test, Aldridge said, but the competition
is different. "This way you're com-
peting with the full force," he said.
Special awards were given to junior
Sebastian Rotella for his short story
"Plus Tips, Exiles, and Reunion," and
to Laura Kay Kasischke, a junior from
Grand Rapids, for her poem "The
SHORT OR LONG
Hairstyles for
Men and Women
DASCOLA STYLISTS
Liberty off State.......668-9329
East U. at South U.......*662-0354
A rboland...............971-9975
Maple Village.........761-2733

Pheasant Does Her Final Dance."
Special awards were given to the win-
ners of four first places in the minor
competition, which is for first-year
through third-year students. Rotella
and Kasischke each received $1,500.
After the awards were handed out,
Kingston congratulated the winners
and the non-winners, acknowledging
the hard work each contestant put for-
th. "I am amazed that you can write
and go to school at the same time," she
said.
Kingston said after the ceremony
that the Hopwood competition is a great
way to encourage young students to
write.
"I'm sure it influences the at-
mosphere of this place (the University)
for young people to write," she said.

Washington hailed as new
mayor, Epton defeated
(Continued from Page 1)

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Nevertheless, Washington said
Chicago residents must deal with the
racial divisions. "The'y can't bury it
because that wouldn't solve the
problem."
Epton, bitter in losing his quest to be
the city's first Republican mayor in 52
years, offered no concession. He
dispatched his brother to the recon-
ciliation meeting, breaking a pledge
made on election eve to attend win or
lose.
THE VANQUISHED Republicanwas
criticized in news reports for bitter
remarks late Tuesday as the vote was
counted. In a television interview, Ep-
ton wished Washington well in coping
with city finances but made a snide
reference to the congressman's 1970's
no-contest plead to charges of failing to
file federal income tax returns.
"His expertise in the area of finances
certainly leaves a lot to be desired,"
Epton said.

"The black friends that I've lost,
perhaps it's just as well that I found out
at this stage. But in the future, I'll save
a lot of money on charitable causes."
LOCAL Democratic powers in the
nation's second-largest city were not
too bashful to try to climb on the
Washington victory bandwagon.
Alderman Roman Pucinski, one of
eight Democratic committeemen who
endorsed Epton, said he now is ready to
support Washington.
"I intend to work closely with him,"
said Pucinski, a former congressman
whose ward went 90-10 for Epton. But
he warned Washington will have to ally
white fears "by his conduct, by his ac-
tions, by his speech."
BOTH MAYOR Jane Byrne and
County Democratic Chairman Edward
Vrdolyak issued terse statements
saying little and promising less.
"The people have spoken, and
Chicago has a mayor," Mrs. Byrne
said, pushing past reporterssoutside her
office, who finished second to
Washington in February's bitter
Democratic primary.
In his victory speech early yesterday
to thousands of cheering supporters,
Washington extended the olive branch
and proclaimed a new national
Democratic coalition.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Walesa seized and questioned
WARSAW, Poland - Crying "tell the whole world," former Solidarity
Leader Lech Walesa was taken from his home by police yesterday for
several hours of interrogation about his meetings with fugitive leaders of the
banned union.
An official communique broadcast on national television said Walesa was
released after being questioned about his weekend talks with the Solidarity
activists, who are high on the Polish militia's most-wanted list.
"After explanations, Walesa was allowed to go home," the official PAP
news agency reported.
Looking tired and tense, Walesa returned to his home in the Baltic port of
Gdansk, nearly five hours after he had been taken away by three armed
policemen.
Review of EPA candidate finds
possible conflict of interests
WASHINGTON - William Ruckelshaus, President Reagan's choice to
take over the troubled Environmental Protection Agency, is a director of a
firm that EPA auditors accused of grossly overcharging the government on
"superfund" waste cleanup contracts.
There was no indication from EPA documents that Ruckelshaus played any
role in three disputed contracts held by the firm, Peabody Clean Industry
Inc.
Ruckelshaus, who is awaiting Senate confirmation as successor to Anne
Burford, who resigned under pressure March 9, was flying from Seattle to
Washington yesterday and could not be reached for comment.
Interim EPA audits of three emergency cleanups of chemical dumps han-
dled by Peabody Clean Industry last year concluded that the firm over-
charged EPA by $335,022 and inadequately documented $2 million in other
charges.
At the time of the three cleanups, Peabody Clean Industry was a branch of
Peabody International Corp. of Stamford, Conn., a firm that Ruckelshaus
has served as an outside director since 1974. Ruckelshaus was EPA's first
administrator from 1970 to1973.
Hondurans move into Nicaragua
CIFUENTES, Honduras Anti-Sandinista forces apparently have moved
most of their campus from Honduras into Nicaragua but residents of the
area report a constant flow of insurgents across the rugged, unguarded bor-
der.
Sometimes the rebels cross back into Honduras to flee Nicaraguan army
attacks, sources said.
Refugees have also been coming from Nicaragua recently in large num-
bers. There are about 1,000 such new arrivals in camps in Danli, a town far-
ther inland, being cared for by the Honduran Red Cross and Caritas, a
Roman Catholic relief agency.
The refugees tell of forced emlistment in the Nicaraguan militias, of death
threats against evangelists and of food-ration cards being withheld for
refusal to join cooperatives organized by the leftists Sandinista government.
Officials estimate there are 26,000 Nicaraguan refugees in Honduras.
Vietnam to withdraw troops
from Cambodia next month
BANGKOK, Thailand - Vietnam announced yesterday it would withdraw
some of its estimated 180,000 troops in Cambodia next month, following a
two-week blitz of Cambodian guerrillas along the Thai border.
The withdrawal was announced by the foreign ministers of Vietnam,
Cambodia and Laos. Their joint communique, broadcast by the Voice of
Vietnam, did not say how many troops would be pulled out.
A similar withdrawal was announced last summer, but then also the num-
ber of troops withdrawn and the number left were not announced.
The foreign ministers also renewed an earlier.proposal for a special
"security zone" along the Thai-Cambodian frontier, a neutral strip super-
vised by the United Nations. The proposal was rejectedhby Thailand and the
other non-Communist nations of Southeast ASia, which recognize the anti-
Vietnamese coalition whose guerrilla camps are located along the border.
Pill linked to heart disease
BOSTON - Some brands of birth control pills raise levels of a kind of
cholesterol linked with heart disease, and long-time use of these pills "may
be undesirable," a study says.
The research may explain why women who use the pill face an increased
risk of heart attack and stroke.
The researchers found widely varying levels of different forms of
cholesterol in pill users' blood, depending largely on the proportion of two
kinds of sex hormones in their birth control pills.
Pills that are relatively high in progestin and low in estrogen raise the
levels of the hazardous form of cholesterol, called low density lipoprotein
cholesterol, or LDL. But pills that were low in progestin and high in estrogen
didn't do this.
LDL causes fatty deposits on the blood vessels and makes them narrow

and clog. This condition, called hardening of the arteries, contributes direc-
tly to heart attack and stroke.
The.effects-of the balance between the two hormones "may underlie the
increased incidence of stroke and myocardial infarction heart attack in
women of childbearing age who take oral contraceptives," the researchers
wrote.
OTbr 3lidjigan BOat-i
Vo.XCIII, No. 154
Thursday, April 14,1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
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scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
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I.

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Bottle assault
A 25-year-old man was assaulted with
a bottle in the parking lot of the Broad-
way Party store Tuesday afternoon,
Ann Arbor Police said. The complain-
tant observed a man in his early 20s at-
tempting to shoplift a carton of cigaret-
tes and reported the incident to the
clerk. The man was followed out of the
store and struck over the head with a
wine bottle. The assailant fled on foot
and is still sought by police.
- Halle Czechowski

I

NO CIVILIAN BAND
CAN MAKe YoTHU IS OFFER.

01

If you're a musician who's serious
about performing, you should take a
serious look at the Army.
Army bands offer you an average
of 40 performances a month. In every-
thing from concerts to parades.
Army bands also offer you a
chance to travel.

The Army has bands performing
in Japan, Hawaii, Europe and all
across America.
And Army bands offer you the
chance to play with good musicians. Just
to qualify, you have to be able to sight-
read music you've never seen before-and
demonstrate several other musical skills.

It's a genuine, right-now, imme-
diate opportunity.
Compare it to your civilian offers.
Then write: Army Opportunities, P.O.
Box 300, North Hollywood, CA 91603.
ARY .BAN
BE ALLYOU CAN BE.

Editor-in-chief .. . . . . . . .
Managing Editor.
Opinion Page Editors.........
University Editor.
News Editor.. . . . . . . . .
Student Affairs Editor ...... .
Arts Magazine Editor ...........
Associate Arts./Mogozine Editors.
Sports Editor. .................
Associate Sports Editors........ .

...BARRY WITT
...JANET RAE
.... KENT REDDING
DAVID SPAK
FANNIE WEINSTEIN
..GEORGE ADAMS
.......BETH ALLEN
..... ...BEN TICHO
LARRY DEAN
MARE HODGES
SUSAN MAKUCH
... JOHN KERR
.J.. JIM DWORMAN
LARRY FREED

son Faye. chris Gerbosi. Paul Helgren. Steve Hunter.
Doug Levy. Tim Mokinen. Mike McGraw. Rob Pollard
Dan Price. Paul Resnick, Scott Salowich Amy Schiff.
Paula Schipper. Adam Schwartz. John Toyer, Steve
Wise.
BUSINESS MANAGER........SAMG. SLAUGHTER IV
SALES MANAGER ................... MEG GIBSON
DISPLAY MANAGER................. JEFF VOIGHT
CLASSIFIEDS MANAGER............... PAM GILLERY
OPERATIONS MANAGER..........LAURIE ICZKOVITZ
FINANCE MANAGER..................JOE TRULIK
NATIONAL MANAGER.................GITA PILLAI
ASSISTANT DISPLAY MANAGER ..... NANCY GUSSIN
ASST. CLASSIFIEDS MANAGER . ... TOM GUNDERSON
CIRCULATION COORDINATOR........,TIM McGRAW

i

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