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March 29, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-29

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4

Page 2-Tuesday, March 29, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Drunk drivers face stiffer laws

LANSING (UPI) - Backers of
Michigan's tough new drunk driving
laws, which kick in after midnight
tonight, believe the legislation will
result in more arrests and fewer high-
wax deaths - but they also warn the
battle is not over.
"It's a big step forward," said Lee
Landes, spokesman for Mothers Again-
st -Drunk Drivers, the group which
helped spearhead last year's successful
push for the new law. "We have a lot of
work to do."
The legislation, which takes effect at
12:01 tomorrow morning, generally im-

poses stiffer sanctions on driver's
licenses and allows police to administer
roadside breath tests for suspected
drunken drivers.
THOSE TESTS, said an early critic of
the legislation, are the most important
part of the new laws.
David Cahill, a staff attorney for the
House Judiciary Committee which in-'
tensely scrutinized the bills before they
became law, said the tests will "allow
police to arrest people they were not
confident about arresting before.'.'
No new law can be effective, he said,

Rowe file
(Continued from Page 1)
Byron McFall, who also acted as a
contact agent for Rowe, said Rowe had
a "propensity for being a good infor-
mant ... understood what he was sup-
posed to do."
MCFALL SAID HE believes he had
complete control over Rowe when he
was acting as Rowe's contact. He added
that he had no reason to believe Rowe
engaged in acts of violence. McFall also
testified in a video-taped deposition.
The former FBI agent told the court he
instructed Rowe not to participate in
any violent activities.
McFall said he knew Rowe had one
gun. "But I don't know if he had a .38
caliber or not," he said. The shot that

requested
killed Viola Liuzzo came from a .38
caliber pistol.
ACCORDING TO Joseph Sullivan, a
former FBI agent who was put in
charge of the Liuzzo investigation in
Selma, it was "commonplace" for
Klansmen like the three accompanying
Rowe the night of Liuzzo's death to at-
tend civil rights marches.
He added that it "wasn't at all
unusual for Klansmen to have side ar-
ms and to carry them." Klansmen
Eugene Thomas and Collie LeRoy
Wilkins were imprisoned for their part
in the shooting. Rowe was indicted for
Liuzzo's murder in September, 1978,
but was released because he was gran-
ted FBI immunity.
In last week's testimony, Rowe
maintained that Wilkins fired the shots
which killed Liuzzo. Thomas and
Wilins, on the other hand, accused
Rowe of murdering the civil rights
worker.
Daily reporter Jackie Young con-
tributed to this story.

unless the law enforcement community
acts.
"PEOPLE IN bars don't have law
books," he said. "We've got to make it
more likely they will be caught."
State Police currently have on order
100 of the new roadside testing devices,,
but they are not expected to be
delivered for another week or two.
Even then, said a State Police
spokesman, a training period will delay
,getting the $400 units in troopers' hands
at the side of expressways until mid-
April at the earliest.
Aside from the new tests, the new law
provides a series of tougher license
sanctions. Minimum penalties for first
offenders include:
* License suspensions for six months
for driving with a blood alcohol content
more than 0.10 percent. Currently, such
a level is viewed only as evidence of
drunkenness.
Film--s spai
(Continued from Page 1)
"What are they going to do, whack our
ears off," he said.
The standing room only crowd at
MLB 3 was first shown a slide presen-
tation by Atmospheric and Oceanic
Science Prof. Perry Samson. He
presented information gathered by a
joint study conducted by the American
and Canadian governments to discover
what the causes and effects of acid rain
are.
SAMSON SAID the American gover-
nment tells the public that scientists
are unsure of the specific causes of acid
rain. "The EPA would like you to
believe there is a lot of confusion among
scientists (about the causes), but I
disagree. There is a lot of confusion in
Washington."
Since the 1950s the acidity levels of

" License suspension for six months for
'operating under the influence of
liquor," which means driving
recklessly after drinking or using
drugs. License suspension is not now
mandatory.
" License suspension for three months
for "operating while impaired" -
usually a 0.08-0.09 percent blood alcohol
content. Licenses currently are not
suspended for the offense.
" License suspension for six months
and six penalty points for refusing to
take a police-administered blood
alcohol content test. The current
penalty is a 90-day license suspension.
Drivers can lose their licenses if they
receive 12 penalty points in three years.
" Mandatory participation in a sub-
stance abuse screening program aimed
at spotting problem drinkers.
Landes said the license provisions are
the key to the success of the new law.

debate

water has risen rapidly. While at first
the causes were not known, today scien-
tists can pinpoint the sites where acid
rain is produced, he said.
According to the film, acid rain began
as soon as oil was burned to create
energy. Burning oil produces nitrogen
oxides and sulfur dioxides as waste
products. Some of these particles fall to
Earth as dry particles, the rest mix
chemically and form acids which fall
from the atmosphere as acid rain.
MORE THAN $500 million a year is
spent in Canada to repair the damage
caused by acid rain, most of which
comes from the United States, the film
reported.
The second film showed film clips of
mutated atomic bomb victims in
Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

City plays find and tow'

Say.
_ DIne.Ax y"3DSCOUNT MUFFLERS
-----jiAMERICAN ANO FOREIGN CAR SPECIALIST
FROM AS
LOW AS...
In s ta lle d b y T ranne d
sTaied y*FITS MANY
Specialists SMALL CARS
Installed *AT
PARTICIPATING
FOREIGN CARS
Featuring...CUSTO M DUA LS
Cws HEAVY DUTY SHOCKS
-One of the finest names CUSTOM PIPE BENDING
in automotive parts!" YPS1LANT
2606 Washtenaw Ave.....57.2-9177
(11/2 mile East of US 23)
Individually Owned & Operated
IN AND OUT IN 30 MINUTES IN MOST CASES
v OPEN DAILY AND SAT.8-6GPM
Copyright©1983 Meineke#

(Continued from Page 1)
tickets belong to Michigan students," he
said. Scott denied that the crackdown
was an effort to "pick on" students.
The crackdown usually comes at this
time of year so the police can catch up
with University students who will be
leaving for the summer, said Donald

Ayers, an assistant city administrator..
"Students will soon be going home in
mom and dad's car and we won't be
able to get them," he said.
DURING THE crackdown's first
seven hours, over 50 cars had been
hauled in, Ayers said. By 9 p.m. last
night, 80 cars had been impounded.,
Until April 15, the number of "spot-
ters" looking for violators will be in-
creased from two to 12, Scott said.
During that time the city hopes to
collect $400,000 in ticket fees.
The areas that will be watched most
carefully are State Street, South
University, and University parking
lots, said Jim Stein, an assistant
parking manager.
THE CITY is using three different
towing companies to impound the cars,
he said.
According to Stein, computer listings
of every license plate with six or more
tickets have been distributed to the
spotters. Spotters then check every
license plate they see to determine
whether the car merits impoundment.
If a $3 parking ticket is not paid
within a week, the fee goes up to $8. Af-
ter two weeks, the fine is increased to
$18, Scott said.
A MINIMUM OF six tickets, or $108
in fines, is necessary before a car will
be impounded, he said. There will also
be a $31 towing fee and a $2.50 per day
parking fee.
Some delinquent parkers have cars
with "$300 to $400 worth of parking
charges on them," according to Scott.
Another reason the city is stepping up
its collection efforts is that new
Michigan license plates are being
issued, Ayers said. "Once they change
their license plates, we won't be able to
find them," Ayers said.
PROPOSAL A is A- OK
"ENERGY SAVINGS
IN RENTAL HOUSING"
Endorsed by the Ecology Center
MSA, PIRGIM, LSA- SG & others.
VOTE YES - April 4r
Paid for bt Sport Guides 415 Detroit Street

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
EPA official to investigate sale
of contaminated Michigan fish
CHICAGO - The regional administrator of the Environmental Protection
Agency said yesterday he will investigate reports that dioxin-contaminated
fish from Michigan's Saginaw Bay are being sold in major cities.
A report in the New York Times said hundreds of thousands of pounds of
carp from Saginaw Bay, samples of which have been found to have dioxin
residues, are shipped each year to markets in major cities.
Carp is a major ingredient in gefilte fish, which is a staple for the Jewish
Passover holiday that started last night. The Times said the largest makers
of bottled gefilte fish said they do not use carp from Michigan.
In a related development, EPA officials in Washington told UPI they
urged in a 1981 draft report that fishing in the Great Lakes be banned
because of dioxin contamination, but the federal government did little to
discourage fishing.
Sources said regional EPA officials in Chicago recommended in the
report, issued in the spring of 1981, that Great Lakes fishing be stopped
because potential cancer risks were too high.
Major's role stalls Mideast talks
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Lebanese news media and Israeli sources said
yesterday that the role of militia commander Saad Haddad, Israel's ally in
southern Lebanon, is the last obstacle to progress in the troop withdrawal
negotiations.
"The talks remain deadlocked because Isreal insists on giving Maj. Saad
Haddad and his militia a major security role in the South," the Lebanese
state radio reported as U.S. presidential envoy Philip Habib returned to
Beirut from Israel with no indications of a breakthrough.
The U.S.-Israeli-Lebanon talks on the withdrawal of foreign troops
from Lebanon resume Thursday in the Israeli border town of Kiryat Sh-
mona. Israeli sources, who asked anonymity, agreed that settlement was
blocked by the dispute over Haddad's future role in security arrangements
to keep Palestinian guerrillas out of south Lebanon.
The Lebanese government last week rejected Israel's demand that Had-
dad, who set up his own territory along the Israeli-Lebanese border, be rein-
stated in the Lebanese army and put in charge of security in the South.
Nicaraguan officials blame
U.S. aid for recent rebel attack
MANAGUA, Nicaragua - American aid to anti-government exiles made
possible an attack that killed five people and wounded 24 others, seven of
them children, the official newspaper reported yesterday.
"It is the unconditional and unrestricted aid that the U.S. government
gives to the Somocista counterrevolutionary forces that is the ultimate cause
of the situation that endangers Nicaragua," said a Foreign Ministry
statement in the ruling Sandinista party newspaper, Barricada. The
Somocistas supported the late Nicaraguan dictator Anastasio Somoza, and
are opposed to the leftist regime in Managua.
Four Nicaraguan soldiers and French doctor Jean-Michel Grosjean were
reported killed in the rebel attack Saturday on the town of Rancho Grande,
100 miles northeast of Managua in Matagalpa province. The government
said seven children, including an 8-year-old boy who had his leg amputated,
were among 24 people wounded in the attack.
U.S. failed to turn in Barbie
WASHINGTON - State Department documents show the U.S. gover-
nment failed to take formal action on a French request to turn accused Nazi
was criminal Klaus Barbie over to France for prosecution.
The documents, which surfaced yesterday during a Justice Department
investigation of former Nazi official's relationship with the U.S. gover-
nment, said the French ambassador in Washington made a formal request
for Barbie on Nov. 9, 1949.
The papers in the National Archives show that U.S.officials sent the Fren-
ch ambassador's 1949 request to the U.S. high commissioner in Germany
with the suggestion that the French be told to pursue the matter with him.
That was done in January 1950, but Barbie was not turned over to the
French. Instead, the man known as the "Butcher of Lyon" fled to Bolivia in
1951.
Allegations have surfaced that U.S. officials helped Barbie flee to South
America, and that has led to a number of investigations of his dealings with
U.S. intelligence agents.
Scientists scruminize defense plan
WASHINGTON - President Reagan's call for a U.S. defense system that
would render nuclear weapons obsolete has sparked a debate among
physicists, who disagree over whether such a defense system is possible.
Most scientists interviewed by the Associated Press say research on laser
and particle beam weapons - which has been going on for some time -
should continue. But they disagree over how long it would take to develop an
ironclad system, and whether it can be done at all.
Retired Army Lt. Gen. Daniel Graham, former head of the Defense In-

telligence Agency, said yesterday "it would take 10 to 12 years until you
could use beam weapons" against Soviet missiles.
But he favors a space defense plan called "High Frontier," which employs
neither lasers nor particle beams.
That system would girdle the Earth with 432 killer satellites that would
spread webs of pellets. The Soviet missiles would collide with the pellets and
be destroyed.
Vol. XCIII, No. 140
Tuesday, March 29, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
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Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
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News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 763-0375; Circulation,
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w
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4

YOUR BSN IS WORH AN
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IN THE ARMY
Your BSN means you're a professional. In the Army, it also
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BE ALLYOU CAN BE.

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