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March 27, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-27

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Page 2-Sunday, March 27, 1983-The Michigan Daily

Snow flower
This snow sculpture created by Terri Dover of Traverse City was originally a 10
caused the flower, which took 16 hours to create, to topple over.

AP Photo
foot tall daisy. But warm sunshine

Drug may aid sickle-cell victims

By JAMES BODNER
The alteration of DNA molecules
through molecular genetics has been
psed experimentally to treat sickle-cell
anemia and another blood disease, said
a top researcher from the National
HIjart, Lung, and Blood Institute at a
campus conference yesterday.
Patients with damaged or low levels
of hemoglobin - the oxygen-carrying
molecule of the blood - benefitted by
the administration of a drug which
alters the chemical nature of a gene
normally inactive after birth, said Ar-
thur Nienhuis, the institute's chief
clinical hematologist. When reac-
tivated, that gene forms a different
type of hemoglobin to make up for
deficiencies caused by blood disease, he
aid.
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NIENHUIS WAS speaking at the
University's Biomedical Research
CouncilsForum on Biomedical Ap-
plications of Gene Cloning, held yester-
day at the Towsley Center on the
medical campus.
Nienhui s' work is aimed at fin-
ding a treatment for the many black
Americans who suffer from sickle-cell
anemia.
But the researcher said his findings
are too preliminary for clinical use.
Thus far, he has used the technique only
experimentally on patients who had
short life expectancies due to advanced
stages of a disease.
N ienhuis and his colleagues gave
experimental patients a drug known as
azacytidine and found that hemoglobin
levels increased. After finishing a
seven-day treatment period,
hemoglobin levels returned to their
original low levels within sixhweeks.
NIENHUIS SAID THAT he believes
the drug "turned on" a hemoglobin-
producing gene normally active only
during fetal development.
But Nienhuis acknowledged that it is
not yet certain that the process he

described actually occurred, and many
others of the conference expressed
skepticism that it had. Nienhuis said
that even if he is correct, "we haven't
gotten to the point yet where we can
even think about using this drug to treat
a human patient.
A second featured speaker at the
conference, Robert Weinberg, of the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Center for Cancer Research, reviewed
the last two decades of cancer research
findings at the molecular level.
WEINBERG SAID THAT one com-
mon feature in many human cancer
types is the presence of certain cancer-
inducing genes, called "oncogenes."
"The basic oncogenic (cancer-causing)
process is likely to be identical in a
large number of outwardly different
cancer types," he said.
Ten percent to 15hpercent of all
tumors removed frm humans have on-
cogenes, Weinberg said, and he
believes that most of the rest also have
them, although their presence is un-
detectable with current techniques.
RESEARCHERS IN the field ex-
pressed much excitement several years
ago when oncogenes were first
discovered. Experts believed the
discovery was an important clue to un-
derstanding the cause of cancer.
BUT WEINBERG CAUTIONED that
"oncogenes are hardly the answer to
cancer, they are just one small part of a
very large problem."5
He noted that in the transformation
from normal cells into tumor cells,
many other biological processes are
occurring that still are not fully under-
stood.
In addition to the two guest speakers,
28 University research groups set up
displays of their recent work. The
forum provided a rare opportunity for
University molecular geneticists -
who are spread out over several dif-
ferent departments throughout the
campus - to share their work with one
another. The University is in the
process of boosting its work in
molecular genetics, including the
establishment of a Center for Molecular
Genetics to boost research in the field.

Passover
brings
together
Jewish
community
By TRACEY MILLER
Passover, the Jewish holiday
celebrating the exodus of the Jews from
Egypt nearly 4000 years ago, begins
tomorrow night, and two campus-area
organizations are holding Seders for
those who can't make it home.
The Ann Arbor Chabad House, at 715
Hill St., and the Hillel Foundation, 1429
Hill St., will hold Seders tomorrow
night and Tuesday night.
"THIS HOLIDAY is important, for it
brings people together for an important
service," said Esther Goldstein, a
teacher at Chabad House and wife of
Rabbi Aharon Goldstein. "The refor-
med, conservative, and orthodox Jews
can all celebrate this holiday at the ser-
vic at the same time," Goldstein said.
Each food eaten at the meal sym-
bolizes part of the 'exodus from Egypt.
Matzah, or unleavened bread, is eaten
to represent the hurried exit from
Egypt, Goldstein said, since the Jews
didn't have time to wait for the break to
rise. "Bitter herbs are eaten to remem-
ber the bitterness of the time spent in
Egypt."
During the meal, four cups of wine
are served, each representing part of
the exodus. A fifth and final cup is left
for Elijah "to lead the exodus of the
Jews from the exile we are now in,"
Goldstein said.
Andropov:
Reagan's
missile plan
is insane'
(Continued from Page 1) k
term research effort to be carried out
"consistent with our obligations under
the Anti-Ballistic Missile treaty."
"The treaty does not prohibit resear-
ch into ballistic missile defense concep-
ts," Miss Stockman said.
ANDROPOV, NOTING Reagan's
comments about growing Soviet
military strength, said the United
States has ample forces and accused
the president of pursuing an "ex-
tremely perilous" strategy aimed at
making the United States "the world's
dominating military power,"~
ANDROPOV DID NOT directly deny
Reagan's claims - backed by the use of
photographs from intelligence
satellites - that the Soviet Union had
bases in Cuba, Nicaragua ad Grenada.
But he countered with claims of his
own, saying the Americans maintained
"hundreds of runways thousands of
miles away from the United States" on
which they maintained aircraft capable
of launching a nuclear attack and

"ready to take off at any moment.
"In fact the strategic offensive forces
of the United'States will continue to be
developed and upgraded at full tilt and
along quite a definite line
at. .. acquiring a first nuclear strike
capability."

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Nicaraguan rebel forces open
new front; kill ten soldiers
TEGUCIGALPA, Hunduras-Insurgents trying to topple Nicaragua's
government claimed yesterday that their forces opened a second front near
the Costa Rican border, killing 10 Nicaraguan soldiers in their first firefight.
The rebel's Honduran-based radio 15 de Septiembre said the shootout took
place Thursday night when rebels from the revolutionary armed forces at-
tacked the Nicaraguan village of Fatima.
The radio quoted rebel leader Fernando "El Negro" Chamorro as stating
the insurgents killed 10 government troops in the skirmish, about 30 miles
from Nicaragua's southern border with Costa Rica.
"This combat is the beginning of the offensive in the southern front," the
radio said, before adding that the rebels were driven back by a "superior
force" of about 80 Nicaraguan soldiers guarding Fatima.
Nicaragua charges the rebels are receiving aid from the United States and
Honduras, where journalists have visited their base camps near the
Nicaraguan border.
Cheap gas may end with tax
Gasoline can be bought for less than $1-a-gallon in many states, a survey
showed yesterday, but a steady drop in prices will likely be cut short April 1
when the new 5-cent tax increase starts.
A random sampling showed gasoline can be bought for less than $1 in 13 of
22 states.
The Labor Department reported recently that consumer prices dropped
0.2 percent, but would have increased 0.3 percent if it had not been for a 6.7
percent drop in gasoline prices.
The department said gasoline prices had dropped an enormous 10.8 per-
cent within four months, as world markets were awash in oil.
But all that good news may come to an end at most gasoline pumps around
the nation when President Reagan's 5-cent-a-gallon gasoline tax increase
goes into effect this Friday.
The tax increase was enacted by Congress late last year as part of
Reagan's jobs-creating program funding improvements in roads, bridges
and mass transit systems.
100 die in Iranian earthquake
BEIRUT, Lebanon-Rescue workers abandoned their search yesterday
for victims of an earthquake that leveled two Iranian mountain villages and
sent rocks and debris crashing onto a crowded highway, officials said. The
death toll stood at 100.
Most of the casualties were motorists, returning to Tehran Friday after
the Iranian New Year, who were trapped in rubble until rescuers could dig
their way through, official reports said.
The small villages of Larijan and Gazanak were leveled by the ear-
thquake, and up to 10 other towns in a region spanning 27 miles were affec-
ted, official reports said.
The earthquake, centered 50 miles northeast of Tehran, measured bet-
ween 5.0 and 5.5 on the Richter Scale. A milder quake hit towns 100 miles
northwest of Tehran yesterday, causing no damage, the reports said.
Walesa called sensation seeker
WARSAW, Poland-Communist authorities yesterday accused Lech
Walesa of being "an obedient tool of provocation," desperately seeking
world publicity by claiming assassins were after him in Rome.
Walesa, reached at his apartment in Gdansk, said he had not read the ac-
count but added: "Oh, well, let them play stupid. Let them do what they
want. Those are just convulvise movements. They are in convulsion. And
not having read the article, ILcannotrelly gornment."
The Communist Party newspaper in daik, in a report also broadcast by
Radio Warsaw, said Walesa was reaching "for a sensation" in suggesting
there my have been a plot to kill him on the Rome trip in 1981.
The account said Walesa "finds it too difficult to come to terms with his
loss of popularity" and asked, "How long will he remainat the top of world
press reports? What new things will be concocted in few.weeks time?"
The report said Walesa recently told Italian journalists that during his 1981
visit to Italy he was urged to enter a car without a bodyguard. He was quoted
as saying that it was "a godd thing too. Things might have taken a bad turn. I
might not have returned."
Walesa told ABC News on Wednesday that during his trip he was asked to
take a walk without bodyguards. "At the last moment, I said I was not
going... I probably avoided losing my head because, so far as I know, there
was some incident and I can suspect that I would have been hit," he said.
Bomb explodes in Bethlehem
TEL AVIV, Israel-A bomb exploded on Bethlehem's Manger Square
yesterday as U.S. special envoy Philip Habib returned to Jerusalem-repor-
tedly carrying new Lebanese proposals to break the deadlock in troop with-
drawal talks.
The military command said the bomb exploded outside a shop near the
Bethlehem police station and caused no injuries. Israel radio reported that
police later found a second bomb nearby and safely defused it. There was not
immediate claim of responsibility.
The military command said its soldiers were patrolling Bethlehem, Arab
East Jerusalem and other location, and Jerusalem police spokesman Ziv
Rotem said all vacations had been canceled as police increased their
presence for the Easter and Passover holidays.
Palestinian rioting has rocked Bethlehem and other occupied West Bank
cities for the past month. On Friday, a Jewish settler was stabbed by six Ar-
abs and a 15-year-old Arab boy was shot to death by a guard of the Israeli-
backed Palestinian Village Leagues.

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~be AeiIglan ?ai
Vol. XCIII, No. 139
Sunday, March 27, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
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J

Editor-in-chief BARRY WITT
Managing Editor ............. JANET RAE
Opinion Page Editors........ KENT REDDING
DAVID SPAK
University Editor ................FANNIE WEINSTEIN
News Editor ................... GEORGE ADAMS
Student Affairs Editor ......... BETH ALLEN
Arts Magazine Editor...... ............ BEN TICHO
Associate Arts Mogaline Editors ..LARRY DEAN
MARE HODGES
SUSAN MAKUCH
Sports Editor.......................... JOHN KERR
Associate Sports Editors...... JIM DWORMAN

son Faye. Chris Gerbosi. Paul Helgren, Steve Hunter.
Doug Levy. Tim Mokinen. Mike McGraw, Rob Pollard
Dan Price. Paul Resnick. Scott Solowich. Amy Schiff,
Paula Schipper, Adamn Schwartz. John Toyer, Steve
Wise.
BUSINESS MANAGER. . ...... SAM G. SLAUGHTER IV.
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