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March 25, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-25

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Page 2-Friday, March 25, 1983-The
Clark

From AP and UPI
Dr: Barney Clark had accomplished
"his goal, his mission" before he died
and his 112-day ordeal on the first per-
manent artificial heart was worth-
while, his surgeons said yesterday.
Clark, 62, a humorous, golf-playing
dentist with a zest for life, died Wed-
nesday night of a collapse of his blood
circulation system and "multiple organ
failure."
UNIVERSITY of Utah doctors turned
off his plastic Jarvik-7 heart at 10:02
p.m. MST.
"It was essentially the death of the
entire being except for the artificial
heart," Dr. William DeVries, who im-
planted the device, told a news con-
ference that was part eulogy, part
science seminar.
DeVries said the decision to turn off
the heart was made only after Clark
had shown no neurological response for
several hours and Clark's wife, Una
Loy, had been consulted.

Michigan Daily
s death profits s
"HE DIED IN peace and with Jarvik estimated it would take five to
dignity," said medical center seven more years before the Jarvik-7
spokesman John Dwan. "He was an in- completed the Federal Drug Ad-
credible man. The heart worked well ministration approval process to reach
right up until the end. It was a scientific the commercial stage.
success. Rodman Moorhead III, a managing
"There is no question we plan to go director of a New York investment firm
ahead with the program," Dwan added. involved with Kolff, said he expects the
"The physicians, the researchers know Jarvik-7 to sell for about $15,000 when it
immeasureably more now than prior to reaches the stage of commercial
Dr. Clark's implant. And that, of cour-. production. Since an estimated 36,000 to
se, is his contribution to science and his 66,000 Americans a year could qualify
legacy to us all." as heart implant candidates, Kolff's
In the days before Clark's death annual sales from the Jarvik-7 could
Wednesday, investors - including approach $1 billion in the United States
some of the nation's largest medical alone, he said.
companies '- poured more than $5 "We feel that for a first implant, the
million into Kolff Medical, the tiny com- Barney Clark case exceeded our expec-
pany whose president invented the Jar- tatiions," Moorhead said yesterday.
vik-7 heart. "We never wanted to reach any definite
DR. ROBERT Jarvik, the president of conclusions about the long-term merits
Kolff and inventor of the plastic-and- of this particular implantable device
aluminum heart, said in a recent inter- until there were several cases. So far it
view he expects Kolff to be profitable in has met and exceeded our expec-
five years, and eventually to be "one of tations."
the major U.S. medical companies."

ctence

Clark
... sets science trend

I 1- 1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
FACULTY SALARY LISTINGS
$1.00 per copy
ON SALE NOW!

student wins world trip

(Continuedjrom Page 1)
and return from the opposite direction.
"I rely on them for advice," Zamor-
ski said, "But I actually do it."
Zamorski plans to begin his trip early
May and will return in September,
when he will present his findings to the
Circumnavigators Club. His itinerary
includes stops in Latin America,
Southeast and Central Asia, the Peoples
Republic of China, and short stops in
east and west Africa.
CHOOSING THE Third World for his

study because "that's where the
world's health problems are," Zamor-
ski said he is confident of the importan-
ce of his project. "In nations where
healing is like religion," he said, "it is
not clear that it is appropriate to install
western means of healing, especially
when we aren't sure of those means."
The beauty of his project, Zamorski
said, is that "I can talk to any man on
the street. Any volunteer can help."
Zamorski read about the contest in

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

420 MAYNARD

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Social Security rescue plan
to include federal employees
WASHINGTON - House and Senatenegotiators, ironing out differences in
the $165 billion Social Security rescue plan, moved rapidly yesterday to force
new federal workers into the system in January.
The members of a conference committee were still working on the other
major discrepancy between the bills passed in the House and Senate:
whether to raise the retirement age to 67, as the House voted, or to follow the
Senate's plan to raise the age to 66 while cutting future retirees' benefits by
5.3 percent.
Congressional leaders expected to wrap up the conference yesterday and
press for a vote in both houses so the lawmakers can depart on a 10-day
Easter recess.
Sen. Russell Long (D-La.), who convinced the Senate on Wednesday to
delay coverage of new civil servants until Congress devises a supplementary
plan for them, was rebuffed when his Senate colleagues voted on party-lines,
4-3, to bow to the House plan. Only Sens. Lloyd Bentsen(D-Texas) and Daniel
Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.) sided with Long.
Long said it was not his intent to keep federal employees out of Social
Security forever.
EPA estimates may be lowered
WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency, accused for
years of inflating its annual auto mileage ratings, may pare the numbers
back by as much as 25 percent to better reflect what motorists can expect in
day-to-day driving.
Agency officials said yesterday they hope within the next few weeks to
propose methods to reduce the figures. One staff recommendation would
simply slash the numbers from the laboratory tests by a fixed percentage.
For the city mileage figure, the cut might be only 5 percent to 10 percent,
but for the highway mileage figure, the drop could be between 20 and 25 per-
cent, according to Charles Gray, director of EPA's auto testing center in
Ann Arbor.
Mileage figures are one of the government's most widely quoted statistics,
often featured prominently in auto advertising.
But they have also been attacked as being totally unrealistic. A House
Government Operations Committee report in 1980 said the gap between the
figures and actual mileage was as high as 30 percent.
For years, the EPA has urged motorists to use the rankings only to com-
pare one model against another, not as a prediction of their own mileage.
But government surveys show consumers are ignoring this advice. Gray
said the leading proposal would apply a fixed percentge cut for all the
figures. He said this would be simplest and would not involve complicated
attempts to change the current test procedures to better reflect road con-
ditions.
Six die in Florida hotel fire
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.- An arsonist set fire to a three-story downtown
rooming house yesterday, filling the building with thick gray smoke that
killed six people and injured three others.
Officials said the victims, who died of smoke inhalation, were either asleep
behind locked doors on the third floor of the Palms Hotel or got lost in the
blinding smoke and could not find their way out.
About 30 other residents, most of them men, scrambled to safety out the
front door or broke windows and clambered down fire ladders.
"It was definitely arson. There were three points of origin in the back of
the building," said Capt. R.E. Huntley of the Jacksonville Fire Marshal's Of-
fice.
Ambushes spark Beirut patrols
About 4,000 Lebanese police in armored personnel carriers and jeeps laun-
ched 24-hour patrols of Beirut yesterday to guard against new attacks on the
multinational peacekeeping force.
The patrols were ordered in response to last week's ambushes that woun-
ded five U.S. Marines and nine Italian soldiers. One of the Italians died
Tuesday from complications after an operation to remove shrapnel from his
spine.
The patrols started a -day after Lebanese soldiers came under fire from
Christian gunmen in east Beirut for the first time since they took over con-
trol of the sector from Phalangist militiamen three weeks ago.
A bomb went off as an Israeli military bus passed by a Palestinian camp
outside the southern port of Tyre yesterday, but no casualties were reported.
Nine Israeli soldiers were wounded in two ambushes in the area last week.
Nicaraguan troops battle rebels
MANAGUA, Nicaragua - Honduras-based rebels said yesterday they
were fighting government forces in three northern provinces and along the.
Atlantic coast in what Nicaragua claims is a CIA campaign to overthrow its
Marxist-led regime.
The Nicaraguan government and rebels both claimed victory in a clash
near the town of San Fernando, 130 miles northeast of Managua in Nueva
Segovia province.
The Defense Ministry said in a statement that 12 insurgents and three
members of the government's Sandinista Popular Army were killed in the
fighting near the Honduran border.
The ministry claimed the soldiers captured 15 Belgium-made FAL assault
rifles, Chinese made RPG-7 armor-piercing rockets and "plastic explosives

only used by the CIA."
Clandestine rebel radio "15 de Septiembre" said, however, that the in-
surgents ambushed a column of nine Sandinista troop trucks in the same
area.
The rebels claimed they killed 35 government soldiers in the clash and
wounded "many more."
ibe Micpgan Baik
Vol. XCIII, No. 137
Friday, March 25, 1983
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Editor- in- chief.. . . . . . . .
Managing Editor.
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University Editor...............
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CHUCK JAFFE

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