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March 18, 1983 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 6-Fridoy, March 18, 1983-The Michigan Daily

II

Ross University
Schools of Medicine
and Veterinary Medicine
Now accepting applications for study leading to
degree in both Medicine and Veterinary Medicine.
Courses taught in English, Programs under guidance
of American Dean utilizing American curriculum.
Transfer students accepted. Semesters begin July
and November 1983. We are an accredited school
and listed in W.H.O. and affiliated with U.S. hospitals
for clinical rotation. Direct inquires to:.
Ross University
Portsmouth, Dominica,.I. Attention: Mr. Butler
or Caribbean Admissions, Inc.
16 West 32 Street, New York, N.Y. 10001

Law Review wants

minorities

1 '1

(Continued from Page 1)
1983-84 board - which took over last
week - adopt the affirmative action
plan in addition to other revisions in
selection criteria.
THE AFFIRMATIVE actin plan was
approved by the old board by an eight to
seven vote. Of the seven dissenting
opinions, two editors wanted a stronger'
plan and five disapproved of affir-
mative action for the Review in any
form.
The new editorial board is expected
to decide the plan's fate in the next two
weeks.
Debate on the old board came down to
those who saw the review as an
honorary society and those who saw it
more as a magazine or organization,
said John Frank, the Review's former
Managing Editor.
THE MAJORITY sided with the lat-
ter view. "The Review is more than an
honorary society; it is a student journal
dedicated to the twin goals of con-
tributing to legal scholarship and
training future lawyers," the report
states.
But a dissenting opinion, issued by
former editors Douglas Davies, Don
Dripps, Mark Herrmann, and Ira
Rubinfeld, strongly disagreed with that
assessment.
They wrote: "Granting, as we do, the
appropriateness of affirmative ad-
missions standards for entrance to a
4v1p
206 s.FIRS1
A-2 48103
AA S 4167
ADRIAN'S T-SHIRT PRINTER?'

program of graduate study does not
automatically require affirmative
criteria for election to an honorary
program of advanced study."
THE DISSENTING opinion also
rejects the notion that the quality of the
Review staff will be unaffected by an
affirmative action program.
"Since the Review staff is already
overworked and generates too few
publishable notes, it seems un-
desirable, from an organizational stan-
dpoint to take affirmative steps to
displace those most able to contribute
meaningfully," the dissenters said.
But Frank, who voted for the affir-
mative action proposal, said the new
plan "ensures that the only minorities
that will be invited. . . clearly will be
accomplished writers, and I'm con-
fident they'll be able to contribute to the
Review."
BRODERICK JOHNSON, chairper-
son of the Black Law Students Alliance,
said he was "encouraged and a bit sur-
prised" by the recent action.
"It's a move in the right direction.
My only criticism is that it doesn't go
far enough," he said.
The black student group submitted its
own proposal, which apparently had
some influence on the Review's report.
That proposal called for staff selection
to be based on a 100-point grading scale,
with writing ability and grades coun-
ting for 65 and 35 points respectively.
Racial background would be taken into
account by giving minority applicants
10 points. A student's combined score
would determine their rank within the
application pool.

Johnson said that he was optimistic
that if the Review's proposal is adopted
by the new board, it will increase the
number of black applicants.
The Michigan Law Review has had
only one black member in the last 17
years. The Law School itself has about
55 black students and another 50
students from other minority groups,
according to the school's assistant
dean. The school enrolls about 1100
students.
The potential of a faculty veto hangs
over the heads of the incoming editors
with regards to the new plan.
FORMER BOARD member Donald
Baker said he wouldn't rule out faculty
intervention because "they have the
power of the purse." Baker said the
school-gave the Review $20,000 last
year to bail it out of financial troubles.
Law School Dean Terrance Sandalow
said he "will not recommend to the
faculty that they intervene, but that
doesn't guarantee that they won't."
Sandalow said that he could not
remember the faculty ever intervening
in the Review's staff selection policy.
But that is largely due to the fact that
no significant changes in staff selection
criteria have been made in the last 20
years.
BAKER SAID the affirmative action
issue currently is being discussed by
the law review staffs at UCLA, Pen-
nsylvania, and Cornell.
"It's a real hot spot on the law review
scene right now," he said.
In the highly publicized Harvard
case, the staff tried to correct the racial
imbalance of its staff by adopting a
rigid quota system. On a staff of 89,

there were no blacks, one Asian-
American, and 11 women. The decision
caused so much dissension among
staffers, that shortly thereafter, the
journal, by a 44 to 36 vote decided tA
merely consider race and sex in selec-
ting eight of its 48 editors. That plan
also received a great deal of criticism,
so the Review tabled the issue for
almost a year.
LAST YEAR the editors narrowly
passed the mildest program yet. Under
the plan, a certain number of editors
can be selected on the basis of racial,
economic, and physical "handicaps'
they have had to overcome. The ap-
plicants, however, must have grades
close to those of students selected by
the standard system. Sex is no longer
considered a "handicap" by the
Review.
As a result, this year's 40-person
staff, includes only two black students,
for example. In contrast, Harvaid's
Law School has 12 percent black
enrollment.
Nonetheless, Harvard Law Review
President Scott Nelson said he is'
"fairly pleased" with the program's
results. "I would like to see an increase
(in the number of blacks on the Reviev's
staff), but we're not now contemplating
any change," Nelson said.
Harvard's program has been Op-
proved through 1987 and no changq in
that plan is expected.
"There is no urgent feeling among
editors or the law school community (to I
do anything before 1987) Nelson saidA
"especially since it caused such a con-
troversy."

Panel wants LSA units spared

AY LA 665-3699

(Continued from Page 1)
teers until 1974, when the University
hired a full-time director and support
staff.
As the result of a 1980 program
review, CULS established a faculty and
student executive board to oversee the
program's budget and make recom-
mendations for programming.
Barham said that he is not an-
ticipating any cuts. The program ac-
tually needs more money to maintain
its programs, he said.
"CUTS WOULD put us back at a time

323 S. Main

Mon - Sat 10-6
All Major Credit+

Fri. till 7:30
Cards Accepted

when there is a lot of .concern for
minority attrition," the director said.
Once minority students decide to enroll
"then the University has a respon-
sibility to provide them with support,"
he said.
If cuts were necessary, they would be
made in the program's administration,
Barham said. "We don't want to
eliminate academic support in favor of
the administration," he said.
"Academic services are our primary
function."
As for the ECB, which is responsible
for enforcing the upper- and lower-level
writing requirements in the college and
provides tutorial services, the review
panel said it did not have enough infor-
mation to make any- firm recommen-
dations. Panel members said they will
ask that a full-scale review of the
program be made before cutting its
budget.
THE FOUR-YEAR old writing
program has received much acclaim
from several colleges around the coun-
try, some of which are instituting
similar programs of their own.
Jay Robinson, the program's new

director, said ECB has promoted more
writing throughout the college. A
preliminary survey of the faculty has
shown "a lot of positive feedback,"
Robinson said.
The third program to be reviewed -
the Alice Lloyd Pilot Program - also
was "reasonably cost effective;"
Pachella'said.
That program, which celebrated its
20th anniversary last year, has been
reviewed four times in the last five
years. The Pilot Program offers
students a chance to participate
academically and socially in a smaller
and more personal atmosphere, accor-
ding to its directors.
A report issued by the program in
response to the latest review offers a
pessimistic view of what would happen
if the program received budget cuts: A
20 percent cut would mean the
elimination of eight of the progranf's
present 28 courses, the report said. The
program's present enrollment is '27
students.

Correction

A picture in yesterday's Daily in-
correctly identified Professor Goran
Therborn as Professor Charles Tilly.

astronautical, civil,
electrical, mechanical and
nuclear. Hundreds of diverse
specialties are included in a wide'
variety of work settings. For
example, an electrical engineer
may work in aircraft design,
space systems, power production,
communications or research.
A mechanical engineer might be
involved in aircraft structure

OPPORTUNITIES
IN THE NEW
USAF SPACE COMMAND

All

MON, TUE, THUR, FRi, 7:00-9:00
SAT, SUN,
5:00-7:00-9:00

NICK NOLTE
is a ,cop.
EDDIE MURPHY
/is a convict.
APARAMOUNT
PICTURE

Computer-generated design for investigating
structural strengths and weaknesses.
Developing and managing Air
Force engineering projects could
be the most important, exciting
challenge of your life. The
projects extend to virtually every
engineering frontier.
8 CAREER FIELDS
FOR ENGINEERS

design, space vehicle launch pad
construction, or research.
PROJECT RESPONSIBILITY
COMES EARLY
IN THE AIR FORCE

MON, TUE, THUR, FRI, 7:00-9:30
SAT, 1:30-4:00-7:00-9:30
Jessica Lange is
Her story is
OSTRBUT E2BY UNIVERSAL PICTURES
Your big
.chance to go
y' totally crazy!
SUSAN ANTON
SPRING
FEVER
(UPPER LEVEL) e1
MON, TUE, THUR, FRI, 7:00-9:30
SAT, SUN, WED,
1:00-3:00-5:07:00-9:30

Artist's concept of the DSCS II I etense Satellite
Communications System satellite. (USAF phoA.)
Recently, the Air Force
formed a new Space Command.
Its role is to pull together space
operations and research and
development efforts, focusing on
the unique technological needs of
space systems. This can be your
opportunity to join the team that
develops superior space systems
as the Air Force moves into the
twenty-first century.
To learn more about how you
can be part of the team, see your
Air Force recruiter or call our
Engineer Hotline toll free

THE FINEST SCHOOLS TURN
OUT THE FINEST LEADERS...
YOU WILL UNCOVER
THE TRUTH
THE
l.ORDS OP
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
MON, TUE, THUR, FRI, 7:10-9:35
SAT, 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:10
Sat at 9:35 "'TOUGH ENOUGH"

1

A i

Air Force mechanical engineer inspecting
aircraft jet engine turbine.
S:Most Air Force engineers

MON, TUE, THUR, FRI, 7:05-9:35
SAT, SUN, WED,
1:05-3:05-5:05-7:05-5
III

mvm , C n Ki , ,! :vv-Y:LaV ..
SAT, SUN, WED,
1:10-4:10-7:00-9:25
NOMINATED FOR 5 OSCARS
PAUL
NEWMAN
THE

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