100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 18, 1983 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-Friday, March 18, 1983-The Michigan Daily

Visit ourbrandnew
Greeting Card Department.

1

...and discover the
feshest ideas in
social expression!

Prof calls budget
commttee "tool'
of administration,

Creative excellence is an American tradition.
FOLET*
M ICH IGAN BOOK STORE
3 22 SO U TH ST A TE ST RE E T

IN BRIEF

By LISA CRUMRINE
Chemistry Department Chairman
Thomas Dunn yesterday said the
University's top budget committee is no
more than "a tool of the ad-
ministration."
The remark came at a discussion on
the University's review process by
University professors, sponsored by the
American Association of University
Professors.
DUNN, WHO chaired the Budget
Priorities Committee (BPC) when it
was formed 12 years ago, said "Our
colleagues on the present BPC perhaps

I, k

a
y
K
OK

are not aware of the original charge to
the BPC. There has been a slippage in
the original role."
"They're not there to make pronoun-
cements," he said, "but rather to put
pressuring advice about the budget to
the administration. The Committee
now is snowed under with detail, and it
has become a tool of the ad-
ministration."
Dunn said faculty can blame "no one
but themselves" for the BPC's in-
creasing ties to the administration.
DISCUSSION centered on criticism
of the current reviews of the Schools of
Art, Education, and Natural Resour-
ces. The BPC has recommended major
cuts to all three schools.
'(The review) is a painful process,"
said Natural Resources Dean James
Crowfoot, "and there's a substantial
risk that those of us in the University
are captives of the unfolding process.''
Crowfoot joined about 35 other
professors who said they were confused
about the review process and thought it
was having a divisive effect on faculty.
" IN A SENSE, we're placing
colleagues against colleagues," said
School of Education Prof. Murray
Jackson, "and perhaps this is unfair to
them."
The danger of (faculty) viewing one
another as enemies - with unit Y
taking money from unit X - is very
dangerous for the atmosphere of the
community."
"It really affects us all," Jackson
said. "If anybody doesn't understand
this, they need a guardian."
ART SCHOOL Prof. William Carter
said he was concerned about the
process used to choose schools for
review.
"Why were we targeted for review in
the first place? Vice President Frye
met with us, and his response was 'Why
not art?"' Carter said. He said Frye
justified the review by citing questions
which had never been asked about the
quality of the art school.
"The whole process began with an
aiutocratic decision, and will end with
an autocratic decision. We feel helpless
now, having been recommended for a
25 percent cut, wondering what the
process for appeal would be," Carter
said. "We're hoping for a face-down
negotiation, just like the School of
Natural Resources had."
Med school Prof. Ronald Bishop,
chairman of the Senate Advisory
Committee on University Affairs,
defended the review process, saying
"the executive officeres are quite
aware of the devastating effecttthis is
having. They are open to suggestions. I
think, however, they'd like suggestions
on how the process could be done dif-
ferently."
But Education Prof. Loren Barritt
disagreed with Bishop. "There's no
dearth of suggestions," Barritt said.
"We just have administrators who are
damn gonna go through with the
process. I just really doubt they'd back
off on what has already been decided."
WESTERN BOOTS
25% to 75% off
U of M Track and
Tennis Building
March 1th and 20th

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Senate passes jobs bill, delays
vote on tax withholding repeal
WASHINGTON - The Senate voted 82-16 yesterday to approve a $5.1
billion jobs and recession-relief bill, sending it to conference with the House
where negotiators will be under pressure to lower the price tag.
The Senate delayed a vote on a controversial proposal to repeal the 10 per-
cent tax withholding on dividends and interest scheduled to take effect July
1. Maneuvering on that proposal had held up action on the jobs bill for a
week.
Senate leaders gave those seeking the withholding repeal a chance to put
their amendment on another bill and promised full Senate debate on the tax
measure beginning April 15.
Reagan administration officials said that more than half the states would
run out of money to pay unemployment benefits by this weekend unless
agreement on the jobs legislation could be reached by then.
"We can't play with the fate of people who are expecting and entitled to
unemployment checks," House leader Howard Baker told the Senate.
State GOP wants low tax hike
LANSING - Senate Republicans unveiled yesterday a tax increase alter-
native 43 percent smaller and of a far shorter duration than one backed by
Gov. James Blanchard.
The GOP proposal calls for boosting the 4.6 percent income tax to 5.6 per-
cent for nine months and includes business tax cuts for 1984. It was im-
mediately blasted by Senate Democrat Leader William Faust of Westland as
"putting a baby's finger in the hole in the dike."
Faust said Democrats probably will back a plan which includes asking
voters to approve a sales tax increase that would be used to roll back any in-
come tax hike.
The Democratic leader ordered the Senate Finance Committee to com-
plete a bill by Monday night and scheduled extensive Sentate debate for next
week. A vote may come Wednesday.
Blanchard said he is pleased with the pending Senate action and appeared
confident the plan he supports will be supported.
House budget committee slashes
military spending proposal
WASHINGTON - The Democratic-led House Budget Committee slashed
President Reagan's proposed 1984 military spending yesterday and added
billions for several domestic programs, including a federal pay raise.
The committee voted to slice Reagan's proposed 10 percent real increase
- adjusted for inflation - in military spending to 4 percent.
Chairman James Jones (D-Okla.) said he believes "much of Congress is
coalescing around a level of 3 to 6 percent growth for the military."
It was the first time during the Reagan administration that House
Democrats have so quickly and easily pushed their own budget proposal
through committee.
Overall, the panel set spending for fiscal 1984 at $863.5 billion and included
$30 billion more in tax revenues than Reagan recommended.
Dioxin linked to birth defects
WASHINGTON - A study of 40,000 Vietnamese families suggests for the
first time that men exposed to dioxin -- a chemical in Agent Orange - have
an abnormally high number of birth defects among their children.
The Vietnamese research - revealed to 120 scientists at a conference in
Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon) - contradicts American investigations
on the same subject and lends support to the claims and fears of many U.S.
veterans.
No American research has linked dioxin to birth defects in humans.
The new study, undertaken by the government of Vietnam, concluded that
women whose husbands stayed in the North during the war ran significantly
less risk of having, miscarriages, stillbirths and children with abnormalities
than women whose husbands may have been exposed to Agent Orange in the
South, the only place where it was sprayed.
Not only were 2.5 million American servicemen potentially exposed to
dioxin in South Vietnam, but the chemical has been found in Times Beach
and other places in Missouri. The U.S. government has bought out the town
of Times Beach, while health officials have just begun to study the potential
adverse health effects - including birth defects - upon 2,400 residents ex-
posed for up to 11 years.
Kremlin threatens deployment
of missiles near U.S. borders
MOSCOW - A senior Soviet official said yesterday that the Kremlin would
have to deploy missiles "near American borders" to gain equality if NATO
goes ahead with plans to place medium-range nuclear rockets in Western
Europe.
Today's edition of the newspaper Pravda added that "a timely and effec-
tive answer will be given to the growth of the threat to the security of the
USSR and its allies, which the new American missiles in Western Europe
would constitute."
In yesterday's edition of the Communist Party paper, Georgi Arbatov,
director of the USA and Canada Institute of the Soviet Academy of Science,
wrote:
"As far as equality is concerned, in that case for the sake of this equality
we would have not ony to add to our missiles in Europe, but also deploy them
near American borders." Arbatov, considered a Kremlin spokesman, did
not specify where.

I

0

4

199 CLASSROOMS
MOUNTAINVIEWUIN
All our windows open to a great climate for learning: summer school in the
Colorado Rockies. Study Shakespeare under the stars, explore our rivers and
snow-capped mountains, and take classes with world-famous lecturers. We offer
hundreds of academic courses, a wide array of professional performing arts
and recreational activities, and a distinguished guest and resident faculty.
If you're window shopping for an exciting educational adventure, call us for
information on our 24-hour line: (303) 492-7424, or write for a free catalogue.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO-BOULDER
Campus Box 7
Boulder, Colorado 80309

Please send me information on the following 1983
Programs:
PERFORMING ARTS
] COLORADO DANCE FESTIVAL
June 3-30
Q COLORADO MUSIC FESTIVAL
June 23-July 29
Q COLORADO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL
July 8-August 19
Q MUSIC THEATRE FESTIVAL
June 6-July 24
Q TEACHER RECERTIFICATION PROGRAM
Q MOUNTAIN RESEARCH STATION (Field
Ecology, Field Techniques in Environmental
Science, Mountain Geomorphology, Mountain
Climatology)
F RECREATION PROGRAM AND FACILITIES
F SCHEDULE OF COURSES AND APPLICATION
Q] HOUSING

DISTINGUISHED VISITING PROFESSORS
Q SHIRLEY CHISHOLM-first black woman to enter Congress and to run for
President of the United States. "Women and Public Policy"
July 1-August 12
F DAVID L. COSTILL-international leader in Exercise Physiology. "Scientific
Principles of Training"
June 6-July 8
F TORU TAKEMITSU AND BERNARD RANDS-contemporary composers,
will jointly teach "Music in the 20th Century," with master classes in
composition.
June 27-July 1
F STEWART L. UDALL-former Secretary of the Interior under John F.
Kennedy, "The Environmental Movement: Its Evolution and Impact on the
Built Environment"
July 12-August 12
ACADEMIC CALENDAR JUNE 6 TO AUGUST 12,1983
Name

X6

City

State Zip

Mail to: University of Colorado, Boulder
Campus Box 7
Boulder, CO 80309
(3(03) 492-7424
Line open 24 hours
The University of Coloradois an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution.

s

4a

1~

i
t
v

YHDName
Address
This.eek to place your Sublet ad ! phone__ __
.ecial Summer Sublet Issue _ _ _
is impossible to accept any ad i
after March 18, this Friday! 1
Summer Sublet Supplement
9 !
Mail or Bring in Person with payment to ! i
420 MAYNARD STREET 1 U
MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: THE MICHIGAN DAILY __
<, x

0Jbe Midligan Bat-IV
Vol. XCIII, No. 131
Friday, March 18, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters) ; $14 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $7.50 in Ann Arbor; $8 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class.postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
borMI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syn-
dicate and Field Enterprises Newspaper Syndicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 763-0375; Circulation,
764-0558; Classified Advertising, 764-0554; Billing, 764-0550.

Editor-in-chief ...
Managing Editor.
Opinion Page Editors.
University Editor.
News Editor.
Student Affairs Editor
Arts Magazine Editor . ...
Associate Arts Magazine Editors.
Sports Editor ....
Associate Sports Editors.....

KE

BARRY WITT son Faye, Chris Gerbasi. Paul Helgren, Steve Hunter
JANET RAE Doug Levy. Tim Mokinen, Mike McGraw, Rob Pollard
:NT REDOING Dan Price, Paul Resnick. Scott Salowich, Amy Schiff.
DAVID SPAK Paula Schipper. Adam Schwartz. John Toyer, Steve
Wise.

FANNIE WEINSTEIN
GEORGE ADAMS
...BETH ALLEN
..BENETICHO
LARRY DEAN
MARE HODGES
SUSAN MAKUCH
.....JOHN KERR
.... JIM DWORMAN
LARRY FREED
CHUCK JAFFE

DISPLAY MANAGER.. ............. JEFF VOIGT
CIRCULATION COORDINATOR......... TIM McGRAW
SALES COORDINATOR...... E. ANDREW PETERSEN
ASSISTANT FINANCE MANAGER.... JOE TRULIK
ASSISTANT DISPLAY MANAGER..... NANCY GUSSIN
OPERATIONS MANAGER.... LAURIE ICZKOVITZ
FINANCEAM ANER..... . MARK HORITA
NATIONAL MAAE . .. GITA PILLAI,
CLASSIFIEDS MANAGER.............PAM GILLERY
SALES MANAGER_....................MEG GIBSON

I

1=

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan