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March 15, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-15

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4

Page 2-Tuesday, March 15, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Lebanon pushes for
self-protected border

WASHINGTON (AP) - Lebanese
Foreign Minister Elie Salem said
yesterday Israeli fears that Lebanon
cannot prevent terrorists from crossing
its borders "are not justified" and
Israel should get its troops out of his
country without further delay.
Emerging from a meeting with
Secretary of State George Shultz,
Salem said "some progress" is being
made in talks on the question of an
Israeli pullout.
He rejected an assertion by Israeli
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir that
Israel should help bolster security in
southern Lebanon for a period of years
because the Lebanese army is not
strong enough.
"THE LEBANESE ARMY is capable
now to control all the territory of
Lebanon," he said. "We in Lebanon are
anxious to have the Lebanese army
control all the Lebanese territory and
for all non-Lebanese armies and forces
i leave Lebanon."

The issue of protection for Israel af-
ter a troop withdrawal has become the
major stumbling block preventing a
withdrawal agreement between the two
neighbors.
Shamir hinted in an appearance on
ABC's "Good Morning America"
yesterday that Israel wants U.S.
backing for keeping some forces in
Lebanon for two or three years.
" WE ARE NOT willing to stay there,
to have a permanent Israeli presence,
but for a few years - two years, three
years . We want to have some
arrangements that we will cooperate -
Israelis and Lebanese - that we will
prevent the coming back of these
terrorists," Shamir said.
Shamir met with Shultz for three
hours,then went to the White House for
a meeting with President Reagan. Af-
terward, the Israeli foreign minister
said the White House discussions had
been "very good and friendly talks."
"The president expressed again his
feelings of friendship towards Israel,
his concerns about the security of Israel
and his wish to accelerate the arrival of
peace in our area - e
peace between all the countries and
Israel," Shamir toldsreporters.
THEY DID NOT discuss details of

Shultz
... meets with Lebanese minister
negotiations on getting Israeli troops
out of Lebanon, the foreign minister
said.
An aide said Shamir would return to
the State Department for another
meeting with Shultz following his
session with Reagan.
Shultz and other U.S. officials have
supported Lebanon's demand that all
Israeli troops leave. Israel has wanted
to keep about 750 Israeli soldiers and as
many as five anti-terrorist observation
posts in southern Lebanon.
One alternative put forward by
Washington is to have an international
force, possibly including Americans,
assist Lebanon in protectings its border
with Israel.

Report
questions
tax plan
LANSING (UPI) - Michigan's in-
come tax increase could be as little as
0.6 percentage point or as much as 1.5
percentage point, depending on deficit
and spending reduciton figures used, a
research firm said yesterday.
The Citizens Research Council said an
increase of one point would do the
trick if the projections of Gov. James
Blanchard's Financial Crisis Council
are accepted and spending cuts "at
mid-range" - $302 million - are im-
posed.
The council also said the state's cash
shortage could be reduced to "in-
significant proportions" in four years
even without a specific tax increase
earmarked for that purpose.
The council's report offered no
specific proposals of its .own, but
merely outlined various options and
their consequences.

MSA raffles at"~ Rck

9

UofM
CHAPTER OF AAUP
OPEN MEETING
Thursday, March 17 at Noon
Michigan League Conference Rooms 4 & 5,
A ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION OF
THE UNIVERSITY'S PROCESS

Frederick W. Bertolaet,
William T. Carter, Jr.,
Thomas M. Dunn
Murray E. Jackson,
William J. Johnson,

PARTICIPANTS
School of Education
School of Art
LSA, Chemistry Department
School of Education
School of Natural Resources

By LAURIE DELATER
Someone will walk away from Rick's
American Cafe tonight with more than
a buzz.
The odds are about 1,000-1, but some
lucky student will take home the $250
grand prize in the Michigan Student
Assembly raffle.
PROCEEDS from the raffle will go to
a student scholarship fund, according
to raffle chairman Drew Marcus, who
is also a member of MSA's Financial
Aid Committee.
Students who have already bought
tickets will not have to pay a cover
charge. For those who still want to en-
ter the raffle, tickets will be on sale at
the bar for $1 and the winners will be
drawn at midnight, Marcus said.
In addition to the grand prize, students
will have the chance to win a $150
MATZA BALLS -
Food for Thought
See page 7

programmable calculator, as well as
dinners for two at the Count of An-
tipasto and the Great Lakes Shipping
Company. Other local merchants have
also donated prizes, Marcus said.
THE RAFFLE is only one way the
committee is trying to raise money for
student financial aid and increase
student awareness about proposed aid
cuts.
A spring beer bash at the University
Club is'one fundraiser in the planning
stages, Marcus said.
On the national level, committee
members organized a petition cam-
paign against the Solomon Amen-
dment, which links student financial
aid to draft registration. The petitions
were presented to Congress last week,
according to MSA member Jono Soglin.
This week, students will visit dorms
to encourage students to write their
congressment protesting financial aid
cuts and the Solomon Amendment,
Soglin said.
MSA is also looking into the
possibility of setting up a computer in-
formation service about financial aid
for eligible students, he said.

Lunch trays may be brought from the cafeteria.
The program will begin at 12:30.

Ann Arbor,
Antiquarian Book Fair
Saturday, March 19,10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Michigan Union Ballroom
30dealers
with books
from five
centuries.
\ First editions I
*Americana
eFineprinting
~r1
" Old &rare
0 I
Free Admission
Sponsored by the Ann Arbor
Antiquarian Book Dealers Assoc. 0
- .

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
OPEC slashes oil prices
LONDON - The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries agreed
yesterday for the first time in its 23-year history to slash it sbase oil price by
$5 to $29 a barrel to avert a global pricing war.
Sources said the 13-nation cartel also decided to retain its current produc-
tion ceiling of 17,5 million barrels a day and impose strict quotas for each
member after 12 days of bitter negotiations to prevent a world oil price
collapse.
OPEC Secretary General Marc Nguema said the cartel agreed to set a
new official price of $29 per barrel with the strict production ceiling of 17.5
million barrels per day.
Each $1-a-barrel drop in world crude oil prices theoretically means a
savings of 2.3 cents a gallon for the U.S. motorist and homeowner who heats
with oil, but analysts say consumer prices have fallen to a level almost equal
to $29 a barrel oil.
Analysts said the OPEC agreement should temporarily halt the recent fall
in world oil prices and minimize the threat of an all-out price war for the
time being.
Dioxin check urged in Midland
LANSING - A Midland-based group and a dissident state environmental
employee yesterday urged that a dioxin threat involving Dow Chemical Co.
is checked.
Figures on cancer and birth defects in the Midland area were cited by
Larry Fink, a Department of Natural Resources employee who runs the
Foresight Society, and Andrea Wilson, director of the Environmental
Congress of Mid-Michigan.
They said there should be a thorough study on dioxin levels in Midland-
area soil and dust and a health risk assessment performed while work at
Dow is suspended.
"We are afraid to live in Midland, afraid of what we might be exposing our
children to and we are afraid for their future," Ms. Wilson said.
The groups made their call in a letter to Gov. James Blanchard which was
released at a Capitol news conference held under unusually tense conditions.
State police security guards reportedly were asked to attend the news con-
ference to prevent disruptions by unspecified non-reporters.
There was no immediate response from- the governor's office, but Dow
issued a statement reiterating the company's position that the dioxin 2,3,7,8-
TCDD is "The inevitable byproduct of a variety of natural and man-made
sources" and "may not be the health threat that some people fear."
31 jailed in Miami riot
MIAMI - Thirty-one people were jailed yesterday on looting and loitering
charges after 500 youths and young adults took to the streets in the troubled
Liberty City ghetto because police shut down an open-air party.
Police said the youths rampaged for four hours Sunday night, smashing
windows, hurling bottles and beer cans and torching bins of trash in the
city's second major street disturbance in four months.
Police put up roadblocks and diverted traffic from the area Sunday night
after three white motorists were taken to a hospital with minor injuries.
They were treated and later released.
Unlike the Liberty City riot of nearly three years ago and a disturbance in
Overtown last December, Police said the latest disorder in a black neigh-
borhood was not racially motivated.
"It had nothing to do with race," police spokesman Angelo Bitsis said. "It
was caused by people who didn't want to turn their music down."
A self-serve filling station was ransacked and angered partygoers
smashed at least one police car windshield before spilling into Martin Luther
King Jr. Boulevard, Liberty City's main thoroughfare. A car windshield and
rear window were bashed in and trash bins were set ablaze, authorities said.
Reagan stands behind
National Security Consultant
WASHINGTON - The White House yesterday reaffirmed President
Reagan's "full confidence" in national security consultant Thomas Reed
and said a top aide is expected to meet soon with a congressman seeking
documents regarding Reed's stock dealings.
Deputy press secretary Larry Speakes said national security adviser
William Clark is expected to meet later this week with John Dngell (D-
Mich.) chairman of a House subcommittee that oversees the Securities Ex-
change Commision.
A subcommittee spokesman said no meeting has yet been scheduled. But
Dingell has informally requested background documents in the questionable
stock dealings case, which is being reviewed by a New York grand jury for
possible criminal charges.
Reagan threatens jobs bill veto
WASHINGTON-The Senate, facing the threat of a presidential veto, tried
yesterday to pass a multibillion-dollar jobs bill that would keep 27
states-including Michigan-from running out of unemployment compen-
sation money.
President Reagan has said he will veto the measure if it contains a popular
amendment to repeal tax withholding on interest and dividends. But Sen.
Robert Kasten (R-Wis.) sought a vote on the repeal, which has 53 sponsors in
the Senate and about 250 in the House.
The overall bill that includes the $3.8 billion Senate jobs bill also contains

$5 billion to replenish the federal unemployment insurance trust fund, which
lends money to states at 10 percent interest to pay unemployment claims.
The fund runs dry after today.
The Senate planned to stay in session last night if necessary to pass the bill
and send it to conference with the House, which passed a $4.9 billion jobs
measure.
Vol. XCIII, No. 128
Tuesday, March 15, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
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