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March 13, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-13

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4

Page 2-Sunday, March 13,1983-The Michigan Daiss
OPEC again fai~ls to -set quotas

From AP and UPI
LONDON - OPEC ministers failed to
reach agreement on the crucial issue of
production quotas during their 10th
emergency meeting here yesterday,
and Venezuela's oil minister warned a
price war could drive oil prices down to
$20 a barrel.
The average world price of oil is
currently about $32.5 a barrel.
The oil ministers of the 13 members
of the Organization of Petroleum Ex-
porting Countries met all day yesterday
and again at night before adjourning
their discussions until today. They have
been trying to settle longstanding dif-
ferences on dividing the cartel's share
of the world market.
SOME MINISTERS say they have
agreed in principle on a $5 per-barrel
cut from the official price of $34 a
barrel, but that such a cut would be con-
tingent on an agreement on production
quotas.
The current OPEC official price often
is undercut on the spot market - that
is, sales of oil not under long-term con-
tracts.
Venezuelan Oil Minister Humberto
Calderon Berti told reporters yesterday
that competition with non-OPEC expor-
ters could drive oil prices in general
down to $20 a barrel.

"If we start fighting, all of us, it will
go down to $20 a barrel," Calderon said.
"WE (VENEZUELA) are the only
country that will reduce its produc-
tion," Calderon said. "All the others
want to remain where they are or even
increase their production from the
present level."
Calderon added that Venezuela could
not afford to accept the cut in oil
production that was proposed by other
OPEC chiefs.
"I told them we are willing to
decrease production, to cooperate with
the others, but we have some limits to
our sacrifice," he said. "We have to pay
our debts this year."
Calderon, in unusually candid
remarks, stressed that his was not the
only dissatisfied country.
Calderon said "at least two other
countries" also were unhappy with
their quotas. He would not name the
other holdouts, but conference sources
said there had been heated disputes
between Iran and Saudi Arabia over
allocations.
IN CARACAS, the Venezuelan
Energy Ministry said Calderon would
return home if no agreement were
reached soon. No specific deadline was
given.
Calderon's comments appeared to

contradict an assessment of the talks
earlier yesterday by Saudi Arabian Oil
Minister Ahmed Zaki Yamani.
Yamani, whose country is the world's
biggest oil exporter, said he believed
OPEC could reach a full agreement and
avert a price collapse.
ASKED WHETHER an accord was
reached to cut the $34 official price to
$29, he said: "We already have agreed
on that."
Saudi Arabia demanded at least a 5.5
million barrel per day quota to enable it
to continue financial assistance for
Iraq's war against Iran.
The full-scale meeting initially had
been scheduled to begin at noon. But
ministers, after gathering in the con-
ference suite, adjourned the meeting
for six hours to discuss differences in
private sessions and to consult with
home governments, OPEC officials
said.
IF THE TALKS end with no
agreement, the price of oil on the open
market is expected to continue sliding,
possibly forcing Britain and other non-
OPEC oil exporters to cut the price of
oil sold on contract. A world price war
would have a devastating effect on the
economies of some oil-exporting coun-
tries such as Venezuela and Mexico,
which are saddled with huge foreign
debts.

'- -

Calde ron
. willing to cut production

In an effort to dry up the world oil
glut, which is cutting sales and prices,
OPEC is trying to set a formal limit on
each member's production.
The OPEC crisis talks werecalled af-
ter Britain fired the opening salvos of a
price war, announcing last month the
price of its high quality North Sea oil
would drop to $30.50. Nigeria broke
ranks with OPEC and undercut Britain
by 50 cents, with a $5 price drop.
Total OPEC output must come down
from the present fixed maximum of 17.5
million barels per day to reflect a
shrinking world market, most OPEC
nations have agreed.

LAST CALL
FOR
CANDIDATES!!1
General Elections for the Michigan Student Assembly (MSA)
will be held April 5 and 6, 1983.
Students will elect the following offices: President, MSA
Executive Vice President, MSA
And representatives from the following schools and colleges:
School or College No. of Representatives
LS&A 12
Rackham School of Graduate Studies 5
Engineering 3
Business Administration 2
Student Publications Board 2
All following schools will elect one candidate
Architecture & Urban Planning, Art, Dentistry, Education,
Law, Library Science, Medicine, Music, Natural Resources,
Nursing, Pharmacy, Public Health, Social Work
Prospective candidates.must submit applications to the MSA
-' office no later than5:00 p.m., March 15, 1983.
For filing forms and further information, contact the MSA
office, 3909 Michigan Union, phone 763-3241.
MSA ELECTIONS
APRIL 5. 6
International Student Pugwash
CONFERENCE ON
SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY
& GLOBAL RESPONSIBILITY
WORKING GROUPS June 20-26
The Impact of Computers (Including Robotics) on the Workplace
Priorities for Biotechnology
International Resource Development
Managing Technology
International Security and Nuclear Weapons
ABOUT THE CONFERENCE
The conference will offer 75 students from around the world the
opportunity to meet with distinguished senior participants in an.
.intensive seminar format. Student participants will be chosen
through a competitive selection process.
THE APPLICATION DEADLINE IS MARCH 15, 1983.
SENIOR PARTICIPANTS INCLUDE: RUTH ADAMS, Editor
of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists; ROSEMARY CHALK,
American Assn. for the Advancement of Science; HARLAN
CLEVLAND, former U.S. Ambassador to NATO; ALEXANDER
GLASS, President of KMS Fusion, Inc.; JOHN ROLLWAGON,
President of Cray Research; HERBERT SCOVILLE, JR.,
President of the Arms Control Association; LEONARD
WOODCOCK, former President of the United Auto Workers;
BURKE ZIMMERMAN, CETUS Corporation; 20 OTHERS FROM
UNIVERSITIES, INDUSTRY, GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC INT-
EREST ORGANIZATIONS.
STAFF POSITIONS ARE A VAILABLE IN:
* Media/Public Relations
* Research
* Management/Planning
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD CONTACT
Michael B. Berger, c/o I.P.P.S. 763-4212
Sponsored by International Student Pug wash, The University of Michigan Collegiate
Institute for Values and Science, and the Institute of Public Policy Studies.
Faculty Coordinator: Nicholas H. Steneck, Collegiate Institute for Values and Science.

Goals key to success for
women, says executive

(Continued from Page 1)
"It is very important to strike a solid
balance between the ideal and the prac-
tical, to balance both career ambitions
as well as personal needs," said Cun-
ningham.
"Career ambitions can quickly
become hollow when they begin to
separate us from our family and frien-'
ds. We must make trade-offs which
require us to devote extra time to per-
sonal goals at one time and career goals
at another, but constantly monitoring
the balance between the two.
"ONCE YOU'VE defined a goal,
don't be diverted from it," Cunningham
said, although diversion can be very
tempting. "Then when we look back we
will be able to be proud of what we did."
"This generation of women has lear-
ned to question," Cunningham said.
"We are a generation of institutional
skeptics." But this is healthy because
the traditional model of women in the
business marketplace is "dangerous -
it nourishes apathy, hostility, and
mediocrity," she said.

Concluding her speech, Cunningham
addressed the audience directly on a
personal level. The applause thundered
as she said, "Women can not merely
make an impact or contribution (to the
business world) by imitating men -
they must keep their traditional
feminine traits such as compassion,
good listening skills, caring d. s ,
''The nation's economy needs you,"~
she said. "The responsibility of
humanizing the corporate community
and insuring that each individual ad-
vances on a more equal footing to make
the workplace a more enjoyable,
productive, humane place to be
remains with you. s s
In addition to speeches by several of
the nation's most successful women,
the - conference offered a
conglomeration of exhibits from the
newestinddiet colas, streamlined sports
cars, and Hudson's fashions, to the
newest technological advances in com-
puter ware, tupperware, and facial hair
(or make-up).{

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Memo could hurt arms talks
WASHINGTON-The Reagan Administration is trying to limit the poten-
tial damage caused by the release of an internal memorandum that accuses
some U.S. negotiators of seeking progress "at any cost" in arms control
talks with the Soviet Union.
Some administration officials fear that the disclosure last week of the
memo, prepared for the chief U.S. negotiator at the talks in Geneva by
someone on his staff, could cast doubt on Washington's sincerity in reaching
any arms agreements with Moscow.
In addition, they say it has worsened already low morale at the U.S. Arms
Control and Disarmament Agency, could disrupt the cohesion of the
American negotiating team, and is complicating President Reagan's
struggle to win Senate confirmation of Kenneth Adelman as the agency's
new director.
The memo criticized more than a dozen U.S. arms control officials and
recommended that many be purged. The paper has been disavowed by the
man for whom it was prepared, retired Army Lt. Gen. Edward Rowny, chief
U.S. negotiator at the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks.
Decontrol gas prices, says
energy commission head
WASHINGTON-The head of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
warned yesterday that unless Congress acts quickly to solve natural gas
pricing problems, there "will be a disaster in the gas market" for both con-
sumers and producers.
"Rules governing natural gas prices must be changed, and they must be
changed soon," FERC chairman C.M. Butler told the Senate Energy and
Natural Resources Committee. The commission oversees the gas pricing
system.
The panel finished four days of hearings on President Reagan's plan to
remove all controls from natural gas by 1986, a plan Reagan says will cut
prices and end the complaints of consumers who have been hit by price hikes
of 40 to 50 percent a year.
"The most urgent problem is that natural gas prices are now on average
too high," Butler said. "Consumers are being required to pay prices that
serve no rational economic purpose; producers with new supplies are fin-
ding it impossible to market their gas."
Nkomo flees to London
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa-Zimbabwe opposition leader Joshua
Nkomo flew to London yesterday, repeating charges that the soldiers of his
bitter rival Prime Minister Robert Mugabe had tried to kill him.
"If I though it was safe to go back to Zimbabwe, I would have gone back
yesterday," Nkomo told reporters before he left. "I am going back home,"
he said, but would not say when.
Nkomo claims government troops were looking for him when they burst
into his house last week and killed his driver. "I never thought it would come
to this when they start shooting at you in your own home," he said yesterday.
Mugabe has emphatically denied ordering Nkomo's assassination. The
two rivals led separate guerrilla groups in the independence movement for
what was then white-ruled Rhodesia, a British colony. After a seven-year
guerrilla war, the southeast African land became black-ruled Zimbabwe in
1980.
Israelis stone Carter motorcade
Palestinians on the Israeli-occupied West Bank hurled stones at the
motorcade of former President Jimmy Carter Saturday and protests against
his private visit to Israel left five people injured.
Carter's limousine had long passed through the center of the West Bank
town of Ramallah when Palestinian youths aimed rocks at the last vehicles
in his motorcade.
The stones fell harmlessly, while Carter's vehicle was at least a half-mile
ahead.
Israeli soldiers quickly chased off the stone throwers. After the Carter
party had passed through the town, protesters were dispersed with tear gas
and water cannons. Israel radio said two policemen were injured.
Carter's six-day visit to Israel, part of a seven-nation Middle East tour,
has touched off demonstrations in the Israeli-occupied territories despite his
repeated calls during the visit for Palestinian rights.
Many Palestinians were angered by Carter's sponsorship of the Israeli-
Egyptian peace treaty and the autonomy plan for the West Bank, which does
not call for a Palestinian state.
Reagan order violates
civil liberties, critics say
WASHINGTON-President Reagan's directive to use polygraph tests to
plug the leaks of classified information raises serious civil liberties concerns
and "smacks of a government that just bullies its people," critics said
yesterday.
Rep. Don Edwards (D-Calif.) said the administration order requiring
federal employees with security clearances to submit to lie detector tests in
a leak investigation has "a totalitarian ring to it."
Edwards said the House civil and constitutional rights subcommittee,
which he chairs, will hold hearings.
Reagan, increasingly annoyed over leaks of classified information to the
media and others, issued the order Friday. It establishes for the first time a

standard policy on using lie detector tests.
The order requires all federal agencies to amend their policies to allow
polygraph tests and warns that workers who refuse to take a test, if
requested, may be subject to "adverse consequences."
In the past, federal employees could take a lie detector test voluntarily but
were not penalized if they refused. Only the CIA, the National Security
Agency and certain parts of the Justice and Defense Departments could
require workers to submit to lie detector tests.
Vol. XCIII, No. 127
Sunday, March 13, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $7.50 in Ann Arbor; $8 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid-at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syn-
dicate and Field Enterprises Newspaper Syndicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 763-0375; Circulation,
764-0558; Classified Advertising, 764-0554; Billing, 764-0550.

14

4

I
I
I

Steinem: omen must unite

(Continued from Page )
Steinem. She described those who do
get involved as "courageous."
During the 1950s, colleges allowed
women very little freedom and adhered
to traditional sex role, Steinem said.
"I've been corrupted by going to
college. It was more than an education,
it was a brainwashing in the '50s," she
said.
STEINEM encouraged women to
take control of their bodies by fighting
for reproductive freedom, calling anti-
abortion legislation a "legal night-
mare."
"We (women) can make sure we
never vote for any politician at any
level who doesn't support reproductive
freedom. Unless we can control our

bodies from the skin in, we'll never con-
trol it from the skin out," she said.
As she took the stage to deliver her
speech, she said she was very optimistic
about the future of the women's
movement. The Ms. magazine founder
arrivedat the conference threehours
late after her plane was snowed-in in
Albany. The crowd, however, didn't
seem to mind and greeted her with
thunderous applause.
Steinem added, however, that she is
not optimistic about the White House,
alluding to President Reagan's refusal
to support pro-choice legislation and
the Equal Rights Amendment. Reagan
has blamed women for the current
high unemployment rate, but women
actually lost one million jobs a year,
she said.
Other featured speakers at the con-
ference by A Better Way, Inc., a job
counseling service, included corporate
executive Mary Cunningham, author
Judith (Ordinary People) Guest,
Paula Blanchard (wife of Michigan
Gov. James Blanchard), and Detroit
newscaster Carmen Harlen.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

4

I PREFER
MY OWN ROOM
Enjoy your own remodeled apartment at University
Towers. Now leasing for fall and winter 1983-84!
APARTMENT 8 MO. LEASE 12 MO. LEASE
3 person/2 bedroom/mo. $485.00 $405.00
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Editor-in-chief...................... ..BARRY WITT
Managing Editor....................... JANET RAE
Opinion Page Editors................ KENT REDDING
DAVID SPAK
University Editor................FANNIE WEINSTSIN
News Editor . GEORGE ADAMS
Student Affairs Editor .......... BETH ALLEN
Arts'Mogazine EditorE..................BEN TICHO
Associate Arts/Magazine Editors .. LARRY DEAN
MARE HODGES
SUSAN MAKUCH
Sports Editor.......................... JOHN KERR
Associate Sports Editors............ JIMDWORMAN
LARRY FREED
CHUCK JAFFE
C EFEFDI KI

son Faye, Chris Gerbosi, Paul Helgren, Steve Hunter.
Doug Levy. Tim Makinen, MikeMcGraw. Rob Pollard
Dan Price. Paul Resnick, Scott Solowich. Amy Schiff,
Paulo Schipper. Adam Schwartz. John Tayer, Steve
Wise.
BUSINESS MANAGER . SAM G. SLAUGHTER IV
SALES MANAGER. MEG GIBSON
CLASSIFIEDS MANAGER ....... PAM GILLERY
OPERATIONS MANAGER .. LAURIE ICZKOVITZ
DISPLAY MANAGER. . . . ...- JEFF VOIGT
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FINANCE MANAGER. . . . MARK HORITA
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SALES COORDINATOR . .... E. ANDREW PETERSEN

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