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March 11, 1983 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-11

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, March 11, 1983-Page 5

Burfor
From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON - A somber Anne
Burford said yesterday she resigned as
ead of the Environmental Protection
Agency because "I became the issue"
and it was impossible for her to do her
job.
Asked whether she was a scapegoat,
Burford said: "I've never claimed vic-
timization and I'm not going to claim it
now.
THE WHITE House moved swiftly to
put the controversy that forced Burford
out of offibe to rest, giving a House sub-
committee boxes of confidential EPA
Rdocuments that Reagan previously had

d replacement
ordered withheld. A spokesman said cleanup program.
the White House will be "moving as fast PRESIDENT Reagan's choi
as we can" to name a permanent suc- permanent successor to Annel
cessor. could prove especially crit
The administration replaced Bur- whether the shaken Environ
ford, who resigned Wednesday night, on Protection Agency can boun(
a temporary basis with John Hernan- from the throes of scandal, thos
dez, the agency's deputy administrator. out of the agency said yesterday
In announcing Mrs. Burford's resign- Many environmentalists re
ation, the White House said Reagan skeptical that the replacement
would turn over to a House subcommit- ford would have much impact
tee the EPA documents, which may EPA at all as long as Reagan
support allegations of same environmental polici
mismanagement, political favoritism people such as Interior Se
and conflicts of interest in the EPA's James Watt remained int
$1.6 billion Superfund toxic waste ministration.

ce of a
Burford
ical to
nmental
ce back
e in and
Y.
mained
of Bur-
on the
kept the
es and
cretary
the ad-

ought
"Anne Burford's tragic
mismanagement of EPA had to end,
but the real tragedy is that the ad-
ministration's anti-environmental
policies remain in place throughout the
government," said Jay Hair, executive
vice president of the National Wildlife
Fedeation. Hair said replacing Burford
would affect Reagan environmental
policy "about the same way that
replacing a water boy affects a lousy
football team."
While environmentalists urged an
appointee free of industry ties, the
names mentioned most frequently as
theWhite House began its search all had
ties to business.
John Quarles, deputy administrator
at the agency during the 1970s, has
spent the past two years as a chief in-
dustry lobbyist urging Congress to
loosen the Clean Air Act. Also being
mentioned are Washington attorney
Stanley Legro and James Mahoney, the
founder of a Massachusetts environ-
mental research company with a long
list of industry clients.

LAST CALL
FOR
CANDIDATES!
General Elections for the Michigan Student Assembly (MSA)
will be held April 5 and 6, 1983.
Students will elect the following offices: President, MSA
Executive Vice President, MSA
And representatives from the following schools and colleges:

McCarthy condemns T.V. news

School or College
LS&A
Rackham School of Graduate Studies
Engineering
Business Administration
Student Publications Board

No. of Representatives
12
5
3
2
2

By CARL WEISER
Writer and former U.S. Senator
Eugene McCarthy called for the
abolition of televised political ads and
TV news yesterday at a press conferen-
ce in Ann Arbor.
1 McCarthy is in town to participate in
"The Future of 1984," a conference
sponsored by the Department of
English. The conference will run
through noon tomorrow.
MCCARTHY SAID that political ads
are a step toward the 1984 described by
author George Orwell because "they
are a conditioning effort and they ought
tobe abolished." He voiced similar sen-
tiients about TV news.
'(Newscasters) don't give you time
to.think," he said. "You can't get the
whole story in 45 seconds."
McCarthy said that government
rhetoric has become more "Or-
wellian," citing examples from the
Vietnam war and the debate surroun-
ding nuclear weapons. In Orwell's
wprld, the government freely used
language to distort people's perceptions
of reality.
DURING THE Vietnam war, he said,
"pacification" meant "driving
villagers into the roads, shooting cattle,
and bombing villages."
"McCarthy said television news turned
the Vietnam war into a "simpleissue
Because they could take pictures of it.
'I would aboli'sh all TV news if I
could," he said.
'McCarthy said the possibility of a
sbciety similar to the one described in
Orwell's book is not as remote as some
people think.
y"IF YOU WERE alert in the fifties,
you could watch our basic liberties
being eroded," through such methods
as loyalty oaths, he said.

All following schools will elect one candidate
Architecture & Urban Planning, Art, Dentistry, Education,
Law, Library Science, Medicine, Music, Natural Resources,
Nursing, Pharmacy, Public Health, Social Work
Prospective candidates must submit applications to the MSA
office no later than 5:00 p.m., March 15, 1983.
For filing forms and further information, contact the MSA
office, 3909 Michigan Union, phone 763-3241.
MSA ELECTIONS
APRIL 5, 6

4

NOW INTERVIEWING
ON CAMPUS

We are now accepting applications for management
positions in:

ELECTRONICS
ENGINEERING
INVENTORY CONTROL
PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION
SYSTEMS ANALYSIS
Applicants should be no older than 34 years old (varies by program), have a
BS/BA degree (summer graduates may inquire), be able to pass aptitude and physical
examinations and qualify for security clearance. U.S. citizenship required.
To make an appointment, sign up at the Placement Office to be interviewed by one
of our Navy Representatives, or call us at 1-800-482-5140.

Daily Photo by DEBORAH LEWIS
Former Sen. Eugene McCarthy was given a reception yesterday at the Hop-
wood Room. McCarthy will speak this morning in the "Future of 1984" con-
ference at Rackham.

GAC

Professors debate '1984':
is novel fact or fiction?

(Continued from Page 1)
Allen singled out China as an exam-
ple of a totalitarian state. "There is
striking corroboration in some of the
ideological writings and policies of the
People's Republic of China in the recent
past."
He described Chinese literature as
being obsessed with the problem of per-
sonal relationships in totalitarian
states: he compared the mass adulation
of Mao with the "prescribed sessions of
group adulation for Big Brother and
hate for his enemies" which were
required of Orwell's fictitious charac-
ters.
Allen said the Supreme Court has
been an intruder into peoples' privacy.
"In the famous 'pen register' case, a
prevailing majority of the present
Supreme Court held that government,
without a warrant, may acquire the
phone numbers dialed by a suspected
person, apparently on the grounds that
because the caller necessarily discloses
this information to the telephone com-
pany, it cannot be deemed private."
Allen did voice some optimism.
"Human nature does overthrow
totalitarian regimes." But he was less
optimistic about the possibility of over-
throwing a totalitarian regime in
today' s high-tech world" The resources
' 764-0558
764-0558
4

of the modern state might prohibit its
destruction," he said.
1984 is undoubtedly one of the most
popular books in our culture, Allen said.
"This definitely says something abut
our society."
Allen summed up his remarks
saying, "It is modern culture that sub-
verts the private world."

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

MICHIGRAS 1983
... Never too much of a good thing!
TODAY'S EVENTS
CLOWNS* MAGICIANS* JUGGLING* POPCORN* BIEGNETS
12-3
Featured on the Diag
HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS
4:00
Dooley's, Second Chance, U-Club, Charlie's,
The Count, Rick's American Cafe
BATTLE OF THE BANDS
7:30
U-Club; Semi-finals, $1.00 admission
PRESIDENT SHAPIRO ROAST*
8:30
Pendleton Room: Union. $5.00 admission
WYNTON MARSALIS
8:00
Power Center, $8.50 admission
DON'T MISS IT!!
sponsored by: Labatts and WIQB

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Campus Box 7
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MAJOR EVENTS PRESENTS:
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Please send me information on the following 1983
Programs:
PERFORMING ARTS
Q COLORADO DANCE FESTIVAL
June 3-30
Q COLORADO MUSIC FESTIVAL
June 23-July 29
Q COLORADO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL
July 8-August 19
Q MUSIC THEATRE FESTIVAL
June 6-IuIV 24

DISTINGUISHED VISITING PROFESSORS
Q SHIRLEY CHISHOLM-first black woman to enter Congress and to run for
President of the United States. "Women and Public Policy"
July 11-August 12
Q DAVID L. COSTILL-international leader in Exercise Physiology. "Scientific
Principles of Training"
June 6-July 8
Q TORU TAKEMITSU AND BERNARD RANDS-contemporary composers,
will jointly teach "Music in the 20th Century," with master classes in
composition.
June 27-uly I

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