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March 11, 1983 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-11

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, March 11, 1983-Page 3

HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
"The Future of 1984," a conference sponsored by the Department of
English continues throughout the day today. The conference opens at 9:30
a.m. with a speech by former U.S. Senator Eugene McCarthy and will in-
clude lectures by scholars from the University and from around the country.
All events will be held in the Rackham Amphitheater.
Films
Alternative Action - Mata Hari, 7 p.m., Witness for the Prosecution, 9
p.m., MLB 4.
AAFC -The Woman Next Door, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Lorch Hall.
21st Annual 16mm Film Festival- 7, 9 & 11 p.m. (different shows),
Michigan Theater.
Cinema II - Days of Heaven, 7,8:45 & 10:30 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Chambuara Film Society - Samurai film series, Kill, 7 p.m., Sword of
Doom, 9:15 p.m., Angell Aud. B.
Performances
Canterbury Loft - Solo Alliance, a concert of dance and other media, 8
*p.m., 332 S. State, second floor.
School of Music - Symphony Band and Wind Ensemble, H. Robert
Reynolds, conductor, 8 p.m., Hill; piano recital, Tibor Szasz, 8 p.m., Recital
Hall; Guitar recital, Andrew MacDonald, 8p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
Performance Network - "The Mother Lode," 8p.m., 408 W. Washington.
Ark - The Red Clay Ramblers, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
Fine Arts Week at MoJo - Mime demonstration and workshop by the
University of Michigan Mime Troupe, 7 p.m., Jordan Lounge.
PTP - "The Father," 8 p.m., Trueblood Theatre.
Speakers
Center for Russian and East European Studies - Czeslaw Milosz,
posium on Polish literature, with Stanislow Baranczak, "Two Centuries of
Emigre Literature," 7:30 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
Committee for Gender Research - brown bag luncheon, Prof. Ann
Larimore, discusses Leila Ahmed's "Western Ethnocentricism and Percep-
tions of the Harem," noon, International Center.
Computing Center - Workshops, Forrest Hartman, "TELL-A-GRAF," 1-
2:30 p.m., 171 BSAD.
Armenian Odyssey - Avedis Sanjian, "Armenian Manuscripts with Silver
Plauses," 7p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Dickens Fellowship - Albert Dunn, "Scenes that Never Were: Notes, on
Dickens Remembrance," 8 p.m., 236 Hutchins Hall.
Certificate in Transportation Studies - Dr. Robert Dial, "Transportation
Network Planning; Simultaneous Mode Choice and Route Assignment," 2
p.m., first floor conference room, Transportation Research Institute, north
campus.
Guild House - Barbara Murphy, affirmative action director, Oakland
University, "Conversations on How Women Grow and Change."
School of Natural Resources - Dr. Conor Boyd, director of high yield
forestry for Weyerhaeuser Co., 3 p.m., 1040 Dana.
Kelsey Museum - Elaine Gazda, "The Kelsey and Karanis: Excavations
in Progress," 8p.m., Angell Aud. D.
Miscellaneous
UAC - Battle of the Bands, 7:30 p.m.; Roast of President Harold Shapiro,
f 8:30 p.m., Pendleton Rm., Union; Wynton Marsalis, 8 p.m., Hill Aud.
Astrofest 121 - Jim Loudon, "Space Shuttle Update," 7:30 p.m., MLB 3.
Gypsy Lore Society - Fifth annual meeting, film and video presentation
of a California Gypsey community by Anne Sutherland, 7:30 p.m., MLB
Lecture Rm. 2.
Folk Dance Club - Workshop with Camille Brochu, Balkan, 10 a.m.,
French Canadian, 2 p m., party 8 p.m., dance studio, second floor of Town,
Center Plaza, 210-216 4th Ave.
Undergrad Psychology Society - Second annual faculty-student wine and
cheese reception, 4 p.m., 928 Church.

Regent calls for divestment

- - - a +-

By CHERYL BAACKE
Regent GeraldDunnyesterdaysaid the University
could use its "international reputation" to promote
social change in South Africa by divesting from com-
panies which operate there.
The remarks came at the first Campus Meet the
Press conference at the Union. The weekly inter-
views give students and faculty a chance to ask
questions of a prominent University personality.
A PANEL WITH representatives from the
Michigan Student Assembly, the Ann Arbor News,
and The Michigan Daily questioned Dunn about
divestment, tuition hikes, and the current budget
review. The audience was invited to ask questions af-
terward.
"The best way to make an impact on corporations
in South Africa is for the University to divest," Dunn
said. "By our divestment, we'll promote social
change by our international reputation."

HE SAID THE University has tried to enforce the
Sullivan Principles for the past five years, but it is not
prompting the kind of change South African people
need.
The Sullivan Principles is a code of corporate con-
duct intended to improve the quality of life for blacks
in South Africa.
He added, however, that the state law ordering the
University to drop its holdings is unconstitutional.
"The legislature that gives us funds cannot tell us
how to send them." he said.
DUNN SAID constantly rising tuition has put the
University on "the danger point" of becoming an
elitist institution. "By constantly raising tuition we
are almost guilty of creating an elitist institution," he
said.
However, he said, that each time tuition is raised,
the Regents add a corresponding amount to financial
aid.
Dunn said tuition hikes are often necessary to keep

quality faculty at the University, something he called
"the first consideration" in a tuition increase. "We
are doing the best we can to keep them (faculty)
here," he said.
DUNN SAID THE University cannot let its current
budgetary problems interfere with its efforts to in~
crease minority enrollment. "The overriding issue
despite budget cuts, is affirmative action," he said
"whatever it takes we'll (work to increase minority
enrollment.) We'll continue in spite of these troubled
times."
Dunn said the sign of the University's troubled
times - the budget reviews - is not "finely tuned,':
but that Vice President for Academic Affairs anie
Provost Billy Frye and others are trying to make it
better.I
Campus Meet the Press, sponsored by Th6
Michigan Daily and Canterbury Loft will continuo
every Thursday afternoon through April 14, at 4 p.m.
at the Michigan Union's Pendleton room.

Tests link gasoline
to Law Quad fire

MEDICAL SCHOOL OPENINGS
Immediate Openings Available in
Foreign Medical School
Fully Accredited
ALSO AVAILABLE FOR DENTAL AND VET SCHOOL
LOANS AVAILABLE INTERVIEWS BEGIN IMMEDIATELY
For further details and/or appointment call
Dr. Manley (716) 832-0763 / 882-2803

The cause of a Tuesday morning fire
at the Law Quad is still unknown, but a
fire official said yesterday tests show
gasoline was involved.
Ann Arbor Fire Marshall Wesley
Prater said he has no strong leads on
who might have set the blaze.
"It could have been anybody, in-
cluding the person who was in the room.
We're not eliminiating any possibilities,"
he said.
Poli1ce
notes.
Flasher startles
student
A woman studying in the Graduate
Library Tuesday night reported that a
man indecently exposed himself to her.
The woman said she was walking near
some study carrels at 9:55 p.m. when
she noticed a young man lying on the
floor masturbating. She called police
immediately but they did not ap-
prehend the suspect, who is described
as a white male between the ages of 18
and 20.

Second-year law student James
Picozzi fell from his third-floor window
after awakening at 4:15 a.m. to find his
room ablaze. He was reported in stable
condition at University Hospital
yesterday, but there was no word on
when he would be released.

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Reverend John Garvey
Glenmary Home Missioners Room 137
Box 46404
Cincinnati, Ohio 45246

Name

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To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

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