100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 11, 1983 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

Page 2-Friday, March 11, 1983-The Michigan Daily

** Michigan Ensemble Theatre
presents

Philosophy prof named
to assoc. dean spot

Tennessee Williams
l-iTin Rool

Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre Ann Arbor
Directed by
Gregory Lehane
March 24-26
8:00 P.m.
March27
2:00 p.m.

OPENS NEXT WEEK

hambara film oekIQ
PRESENTS TWO FILMS BY KIHACHI OKAMOTO STARRING
TATSUYA NAKADAI

Jack Meiland, Professor of
Philosophy and Director of the Univer-
sity's Honrs Program, has been named
ene new Associate Dean for Long-
Range Planning.
Meiland will take the position in July,
when current Dean Eric Rabkin's four
year term expires. Meiland will be ser-
ving a three year term.
EXPRESSING enthusiasm about the
appointment, Meiland said "I'm
delighted to help the college this way."
He said that one of his reasons for
taking the job was "the challenge of the
position." He added that it was more
challenging than his current position
"because I'll be dealing with all the
Deans and helping build up the
faculty."
Meiland will be responsible for
evaluating the quality of academic
departments, conducting reviews of
programs, and assisting in decisions
about expansion, or closure of
programs.
Meiland also expressed interest in the
college curriculum and students. "I do
have some interest in areas such as
curriculum, recruitment of students,
and quality of student life," he said.

HIS ONE regret, Meiland said, was
he would not be able to have as much
contact with students as his current
position allows him. "I like to talk with
the students and I will miss that," he
said. But he added that he will still
retain some contact by keeping his
teaching position.
Rabkin said he was very happy that
Meiland was named as his successor.
Rabkin said he plans to remain at the
University, maintaining his positions as
interim Chairman of the Linguistics
Department and interim Director of the
English Language Institute.
LSA Dean Peter Steiner, in a memo,
praised Rabkin for the work he has
done during his term. "He has tran-
sformed the job of Associate Dean for
Long-Range Planning and has handled
the large volume of review activity
during this difficult period of retren-
chment and reallocation with both skill
and insight," the memo said.
Although he is not scheduled to take
over until July, Meiland said he plans to
begin working with Rabkin as early as
May to learn the responsibilities of the
new position.

V$) . iugjki

AUD B ANGELL HALL
FRIDAY MARCH 11

kill! 7pm AND
4WKOd oj doQmft:lSpm
co-starring TOSHIRO MIFUNE
$2 sinoglefeitre
cospnsre e $ 3aoumIe feature
for nxwe informaion:662-6598

Reagan asks boost in
aid to El Salvador

I I

BLACK SWAMP
FOLK FESTIVAL
sponsored by the
Graduate Student Senate
Bowling Green State University
March 11
1-11 pm
March 12
2-11 pm
At St. Thomas Moore

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON - President Reagan,
setting the stage for a fierce battle in
Congress, requested $110 million in in-
creased military aid yesterday for El
Salvador and suggested he will send in
more U.S. advisers if the money is not
approved in full.
Reagan said leftist guerrillas have
seized the initiative in the embattled
Central American nation after three
years of civil war.
"CENTRAL AMERICA is simply too
close and the strategic stakes are too
high for us to ignore the danger of
governments seizing power there with
ideological and military ties to the
Soviety Union," Reagan said in a major
foreign policy address to the National
Association of Manufacturers.

-U
tiE12P vEIJflU t~
E icfttpn Un.Ig
. 9idngr~tn IItiI.
wi, S kijiga
mm

The businessmen applauded only
twice during the long speech.
In addition to seeking more money
for El Salvador, Reagan proposed in-
creasing military aid by a total of $20
million for Honduras, Costa Rica and
Panama Canal security - bringing the
total request for this year to $39 million.
HE ALSO sought $168 million in ad-
ditional economic assistance for El
Salvador, Costa Rica, Honduras and
Belize.
Reagan said a guerrilla victory in El
Salvador would spread revolution to
Guatemala, Honduras and Costa Rica
and increase the threat to Panama, the
canal and Mexico.
Ultimately at stake, he said, is the
security of the United States.
While pledging not to send U.S. forces
into combat, Reagan said "the number
of U.S. trainers in El Salvador will
depend upon the resources available"
from Congress.
A SENIOR administration official,
speaking on condition he not be named,
explained that it costs 10 times more to
train Salvadoran units in the United
States than in their own country.
He said that if Congress cuts the
requested funds, the training would
require sending more U.S. advisers
there.
Currently, the administration has a
self-imposed ceiling of 55 on the number
of advisers.
THE $110 million in increased funds
for El Salvador would be in addition to
$26 million already approved.
"How bad is the military situation? It
is not good," he said. "For the moment,
at least, (the guerrillas) have taken the
tactical initiative just when the sharply
limited funding Congress has so far ap-
proved is running out."
The president warned without U.S.
assistance the nations of Central
America and the Caribbean could fall
victim to the "domino theory," once
used as the rationale for sending U.S.
troops to fight in Vietnam.
ON CAPITOL HILL, Speaker
Thomas O'Neill said Reagan's request
was in trouble. "I don't see the votes
around here at the present
time .. . He's going to have to do a lot
of selling," the speaker said.
Reagan's request likely will provide
the focus for a debate over the U.S. role
in El Salvador and demands that U.S.
aid be contingent on the Salvadoran
government seeking a negotiated end to
the war.
Sen. Dan Quayle (R-Ind.), a member
of the Senate Armed Forces Commit-
tee, said Reagan "will probably get
most of what he asks for" but Congress
might add conditions opposing U.S.
combat troops, calling for improved
respect for human rights and "maybe a
certification requirement on how the
aid is used."
Senate Foreign Relations Committee
member Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) said
Reagan appears to be repeating steps
that led to the Vietnam War.
ESI (I
-4-

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Bar patrons cheer on rape
NEW BEDFORD, Mass. - A young woman who went into a blue-collar
bar to buy a pack of cigarettes was repeatedly raped by four men on a pool
table while other patrons cheered, police say.
Even though the bar was voluntarily closed Wednesday, the switchboard
at the New Bedford police station was jammed with calls from outraged
women.
A group formed to protest the rape and other "sexist violence" announced
it would hold a candlelight march to City Hall on Monday night.
"Closing that bar, unfortunately, is not going to stop rapes in New Bed-
ford," Rita Moniz, a leader of the group, said yesterday. "We weren't
protesting that particular bar as much as we're showing our outrage."
The rape occurred Sunday night at Big Dan's, a tavern in a blue-collar
neighborhood of this southeastern Massachusetts city.
OPEC on verge of agreement
LONDON - Saudi Arabian Oil Minister Sheikh Rhmed Zaki Yamani said
yesterday OPEC was on the threshold of an agreement to cut oil prices in an
11th-hour bid to avert a full-blown pricing war.
Asked if an accord was near on reducing the cartel's 134-a-barrel base oil
price, Yamani said: "I think we have one."
But on the eighth day of fierce bargaining, OPEC's 13 ministers were
careful to avoid saying there was a full or formal agreement on a pricing and
productionpackage to prevent a world oil price crash.
"We had a general understanding on price, but we need to finalize the
problem on (production) quotas," said Venezuelan Oil Minister Humberto
Calderon Berti.
Sourcesclose to the talks said the bitterly divided Organization of
Petroleum Exporting Countries appeared ready to drop its base price by $5
to $29 a barrel. Each $1-a-barrel decline in world oil prices theoretically
translates into a savings of 2.3 cents a gallon for the motorist and home-
heating oil user.
Kremlin expels U.S. diplomat
MOSCOW - The Kremlin ordered the expulsion of a U.S. diplomat yester-
day and charged he was caught "red handed" in Moscow with radio equip-
ment used for spying.
The U.S. Embassy confirmed that Richard Osborne, a first secretary in
the economic section, had been declared persona non grata by the Soviet
government and was making preparations to leave the country with his wife
and two young daughters. His departure date was not known.
The KGB said Osborne was taken into custody briefly on Monday while he
was working with a radio capable of relaying secret messages via U.S.
satellites.
Osborne also had with him "Handwritten notes" on"'paper that dissolves
quickly in water," the KGB said in a statement published by the government
newspaper Izvestia and the official Tass news agency.
Embassy spokesman Frank Tonini said he had "no comment" on the sub-
stance of the Soviet allegations against Osborne, and the diplomat was not
available for comment. In Washington, White House spokesman Larry
Speakes declined comment.
Palestinian protests continue
against Carter's Mideast visit
Israeli soldiers on the occupied West Bank fired tear gas at Palestinian
students and closed down schools in four towns yesterday, the second day of
protests against former President Jimmy Carter's visit.
Palestinians on the occupied Gaza strip and six towns on the West Bank
burned tires and threw stones at Israelis, the Israel Radio said. Israeli
citizens fired over the heads of rock throwers in Dura,west of Hebron, the
radio said.
Rashad Shawaa, the deposed mayor of Israeli-occupied Gaza, told Carter
the two-days of Palestinian protests against his visit are an expression of
"Dissatisfaction" by an "oppressed" people.
"Good wishes will not get us anywhere," Shawaa told Carter. "With good
wishes we are deteriorating every day." Shawaa was dismissed as mayor by
Israel last July for supporting the Palestine Liberation Organization.
Reagan's chief economist
warns against over optimism
WASHINGTON - President Reagan's chief economist yesterday warned
that "unwarrented euphoria" over the economy's apparently robust
January performance could be setting people up for a shock when February
numbers don't measure up.
"Now there is a danger of a psychological flip-flop," with premature
celebrations turning into equally unjustified gloom, said Martin Feldstein,
chairman of the president's Council of Economic Advisers.
As Feldstein spoke, the government released figures for February
showing a drop in first-time unemployment claims and a better picture for
business expansion, but generally economic statistics for last month are ex-
pected to be less encouraging than January's.
The true state of the economy, Feldstein said, probably lies somewhere
between the two months' figures: a revival under way but only a moderate

one.
Most private analysts have indeed been raising their 1983 forecasts in light
of January statistics. So has Feldstein.
And the president, referring without qualification to "this hard-earned but
inflation-free recovery," said in a speech yesterday that "the signs of
recovery are springing up all around us."
> Ije SIEbtIpan 1tfili
Vol. XCIII, No. 125
Friday, March 11, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $7.50 in Ann Arbor; $8 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syn-
dicate and Field Enterprises Newspaper Syndicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 763-0375; Circulation,
764-0558; Classified Advertising, 764-0554; Billing, 764-0550.

.6

Editor-in-chief ..... .. . . ..
Managing Editor .......
Opinion Page Editors...........
University Editor ...........
News Editor ..... . .
Student Affairs Editor. ......
Arts 'Magazine Editor..........
Associate Arts./Magozine Editors
Sports Editors.
Associate Sports Editors.....

..... BARRY WITT
... JANET RAE
... KENT REDDING
DAVID SPAK
FANNIE WEINSTEIN
GEORGE ADAMS
.BETH ALLEN
BEN TICHO
.. LARRY DEAN
MARE HODGES
SUSAN MAKUCH
...JOHN KERR
... JIM DWORMAN
LARRY FREED
CHUCK JAFFf
LARRY MISHKIN

son Faye, Chris Gerbosi. Paul Helgren. Steve Hunter.
Doug Levy. Tim Mokinen. Mike McGraw. Rob Pollard
Don Price. Paul Resnick, Scott Solowich. Amy Sctiiff.
Paula Schipper, Adam Schwartz. John Tayer, Steve
Wise.
BUSINESS MANAGER .. SAM G SLAUGHTER IV
SALES MANAGER. MEG GIBSON
CLASSIFIEDS MANAGER . . ..PAM GILLERY
OPERATIONS MANAGER LAURIE ICZKOVITZ
DISPLAY MANAGER.................... JEFF VOIGT
NATIONAL MANAGER .. GITA PILLAI
FINANCE MANAGER ....... .MARK HORITA
ASSISTANT DISPLAY MANAGER NANCY GUSSIN
ASSISTANT FINANCE MANAGER ...JOE TRULIK
SALES COORDINATOR ..... E. ANDREW PETERSEN

I
";)

I

,A

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan