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March 02, 1983 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-02

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, March 2, 1983-Page 3

Council passes lock law
for city rental housing
By JACKIE YOUNG Peterson who first proposed the or- insulate their residences won't receive
Both City officials and landlords have dinance, said he thinks it's (the law) a such glowing landlord support. "The
praised a new housing safety law "milestone." "It is the first security lock law went through Council because
requiring landowners to install dead- ordinance provided for rental housing it received professional landlord input.
bolts and other safety devices in their and it is extremely important," he said. But the weatherization law won't allow
buildings. Fred Gruber, past president of the this type of workability."

1
1
1

The law, passed last Thursday by the
Ann Arbor City Council, requires that
landlords install 1-inch dead bolt locks,
spiked windows, wide angle viewers,
and other safety devices in their rental
properties by September 1. Landlords
not complying with the ordinance could
pay a $500 fine.
PROPERTIES WHICH already have
-to 3/4-inch locks wouldn't be required
to meet the new deadbolt standards,
said Ann Arbor Police Chief William
Corbett.
"It might be the first time ever that
the Council and property owners have
supported the same measure," joked
Councilman Lowell Peterson (D-1st
Ward).
The City Council exempted Co-ops
and condominiums from the new or-
dinance since the owner occupies the
building.
THE LAW WILL provide a "safer en-
vironment for residents" in rental
housing where "a lot" of crimes occur
due to unlocked windows and doors,
Corbett said. He added he would like to
see the law applied to every home in the
city.

Pied pipers Daily Photo by RENEE FREIER
Ann Arbor's spring weather brings crowds of people back to the Diag yesterday, including these two budding
musicians, identified only as Craig and Andy.

HAPPENINS
Highlight
Israel's ambassador to the United Nations, Yehuda Blum, gives his second
of two campus speeches today at 10 a.m. in the Rackham Amphitheater.
Blum's topic today is "Prospects for Peace in the Middle East."
Films
MCTF-Broken Blossoms, 8:30 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Hill St. Cinema - Captain Blood, 7 and 9 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Ethnographic Film Series - N!ai: The Story of a !Kung Woman and Born
for Hard Luck: Peg Leg Sam Jackson, 7 p.m., MLB 2.
Performances
School of Music - Faculty Piano Recital, Louis Negel, 8 p.m., Rackham;
Faculty Clarinet Recital, John Mohler, 8 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall;
Tuba Recital, Jay Bertolet, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Speakers
Dentistry - David Carlson, "Musculo-Skeletan Adaptation and Cranio-
Facial Growth After Maxillo-Facila Surgery," 4 p.m., 1033 Kellogg.
Russian and East. European Studies - Brown Bag, James Mace, "The
Famine in the Ukraine in 1933," noon, Commons Rm., Lane Hall.
Afroamerican and African Studies - W. Reynolds Farley, "Catching Up?
Recent Trends in the Social and Economic Status of Blacks," noon, 246 Lor-
c*h.
Politics - Hans Ehrbar, "Psychology of Adaptation to Capitalism," 7
p.m., 447 Mason Hall.
Linguistics - Madhav Deshpande, "Papini as a Frontier Grammarian," 4
p.m., 3050 Frieze.
Ind. and Oper. Eng. - Karla Hoffman, "Statistical Methods used in
Testing Mathematical Programming Software," 4 p.m., 311 West
2Engineering.
Communications - Doug Salerno, "A Rhetorical Assessment of the
Catholic Pentacostal Movement," noon, 2050 Frieze.
Western European Studies and Poli. Sci. - Brown Bag, Pnayote Dimitras,
"Greek Politics Since the October 1981 Revolution," noon, 5208 Angell.
Chemistry - Gregory Wendel, "The Use of Lasers in Atmospheric
Analysis," 4 p.m., 1200 Chem; Thomas Broadbent, "Synthesis VIA Diels-
Adler Reactions with Inverse Electron Demand," 4 p.m., 1300 Chem.
ECB and UGLI - Judith Avery, "Effective Library Research Stategies,"
4 p.m., 2203 Angell.
Dentistry - Burton Press, 11:15 a.m., Rackham Aud.
Biological Sciences - Robert Wyatt, "Population Ecology of Bryophytes,
with Emphasis on the Mniaceae," 4 p.m., MLB 1.
Rudolph Steiner Institute of the Great Lakes Area - John Davy, "The
Arms Race and the Unconscious in Search of Hope," 8 p.m., 1923 Geddes.
Meetings
New Jewish Agenda - Program Planning Mtg., 7:30 p.m., Conf. Rm. 5,
Michigan Union.
Michigan Gay Undergraduates -9 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.
tAcademic Alcoholics - 1:30 p.m., Alano Club.
Science Fiction Club - "Stilyagi Air Corps," 8:15 p.m., Ground Floor
Conf. Rm., Michigan Union.
Nurses' Christian Fellowship - 4 p.m., 2703 Firstenberg.
Miscellaneous
WCBN-88.3 FM-"Radio Free Lawyer," 6 p.m.
Tae Kwon Do Club - Practice, 6 p.m., Martial Arts, CCRB.
Museum of Art - Art Break, "Life of a Mandarin," Margaret Coudron,
12:10 p.m.,
Student Wood and Crafts Shop-Power Tools Safety, 6 p.m., 537 SAB.
Tau Beta Phi-Free tutoring in freshman and sophomore level science,
math, and engineering courses, 7 p.m., 307 UGLI, and Alice Lloyd-Music
Rm.; 8 p.m., 2332 Bursley.
Canterbury Loft-Open auditions for "The Bombs," 7 p.m., 332 S. State,
Second floor.
People's Produce Co-op-Community Gardening, 8 p.m., 211 E. Ann St.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.
NATURE ADVENTURES
PRESENTS
WHITE WATER RAFTING ON THE WILD
OTTAWA RIVER
"1983 RESERVATIONS
CL-ASS IVAND V RAPIDS NOW ACCEPTED"
ONE DAY TOUR FROM APPROX. $40

" "
Outsiders air views
at humanities hearing
By NEIL CHASE humanities program to the subject of
Only 30 people showed up at yester- medical ethics, a necessary program
day's public hearing on the future of the that some say the medical school
College of Engineering's Humanities doesn't want to teach.
department, but some who attended HE ALSO urged the review commit-
showed strong support for the program, tee to show "compassion, dignity, and
which is targeted for possible cuts or respect" for the faculty members who
elimination. may lose their positions if the depar-
The hearing was designed primarily tment is cut back or eliminated.
to air the views of people who are not Mathematics Prof. Wilfred Kaplan,
part of the college's student body or president of the local chapter of the
faculty, accoridng to department American Association of University
chairman Dwight Stevenson. Professors, charged that the review's
FACULTY MEMBERS met with the outcome was determined even before
review committee in mid-February, the process began. "The review process
Stevenson said, and the students will has been rendered meaningless," he
have their chance a week from today, said.
when the review committee meets to Review Committee Chairman
hear their input. William Kuhn said the committee hopes
Former Humanities Prof. Howard to finish its work by the end of this mon-
Siegel, the first of three speakers who th. He said the final report will contain
addressed the review committee, lost several options for the department's
his position last year when the depar- future, along with a recommendation
tment trimmed its staff. for the option the committee likes best.
Siegel likened the college's
Committee wants higher
budget cut for art school

Washtenaw Property Owners
Association, said that Ann Arbor lan-
dlords support the new legislation WEDNESDAY
because the shapers of the ordinanceECA
accepted their advice. "Ann Arbor now *CE
has a good lock law," he said.
Not surprisingly, Gruber said a All Ladies Admitted Free
proposed amendment to be placed on 516 E. Liberty 994-5350
the April Ballot requiring landlords to
A POETRY READING BY
CZESLAW MILOSZ
Visiting Walgreen Professor
THURSDAY, March 3, 1983, at 7:30 p.m.
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATER
(FOURTH FLOOR, RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES)
Czeslaw Milosz, the 1980 Nobel Laureate for literature,
will read his own poetry to the Polish original.
English translations will also be presented.
THE PUBLIC IS CORDIALLY INVITED
SUMMER CAMP POSITIONS
AT TAMARACK
Brighton and Ortonville, Michigan
Cabin Counselors * Specialist Counselorsin crafts, waterfront,
tripping, dance-drama, sports and riding * Music and
Jewish resource * Unit and Specialist Supervisor * Social Worker
Nurse * Secretary * Kitchen Staff
INTER VIEWING TUESDAY, MARCH 1
AND MONDAY, MARCH 7
CALL 764-7456 FOR APPOINTMENT
THE FRESH AIR SOCIETY,
6600 W. Maple Rd.
W. Bloomfield, MI 48033
A JEWISH WELFARE FEDERA TION AGENCY
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Learn How
To BeA
ONE
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from the Co-A uthor of the
Best Selling Management Book:
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Workshop.
FRIDAY, MARCH 4TH
8 AM- Noon
ANN ARBOR INN
Cash Bar Reception/Autograph Party
Noon -1 PM
REGISTRATION FEE $50

(Continued from Page 1)
Keenan said. "It may raise our com-
petitiveness if we limit enrollment, but
we'll lose our edge. They say there's a
desire to raise our reputation, and then
they want to cut the budget; we're not
going to make it," Glaze said.
But Vice President for Academic Af-
fairs and University Provost Billy Frye
said he feels the BPC is in a better
position to make recommendations
than the review subcommittee. "They

(the review committee members) don't
have the perspective of the whole
University, the BPC has an all Univer-
sity perspective," Frye said.

Tonight there's
something special brewing
at U no's
- o
$ 50 ,
PITCHER
AFTER 9 P.M.

i

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