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March 02, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-02

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4

Page 2-Wednesday, March 2,1983-The Michigan Daily

Steelworkers ag

1J

From AP and UPI
PITTSBURGH - The United Steel-
workers Union yesterday ratified an
historic 41-month contract with
troubled steel producers, swapping a
temporary pay cut and other con-
cessions for the industry's commitment
to use the money to modernize mills.
The agreement, covering 266,000
basic steelworkers, was the first to give
up gains the USW won during the in-
dustry's boom years.
THE GRANTING of substantial wage
reductions by so large a union is un-
matched in modern labor history. The
United Auto Workers union accepted
wage freezes, but not cuts, to help keep,

the struggling U.S. automakers afloat
in recent years.
USW local presidents, who rejected
concessions twice last year, voted 169-
63 in favor of the new pact just in time
to meet an unoficial March 1 settlement
deadline set by big steel customers.
"The industry badly needs the in-
terim relief provided in the new
agreement," said J. Bruce Johnston,
U.S. Steel Corp. vice president and
chief negotiator for the steel industry's
coordinated bargaining group.
"WHILE THE agreement is not a
permanent answer to the industry's
competitive problems," Johnston saidf,
"it is an important and urgenty needed
contribution to our recovery."

ree topf
Union officials said the contract was+
the best they could hope for, given the
depressed state of the steel industry.
Steelmakers lost a record $3.3 billion
in 1982, their worst year since the
Depression, and indicated they would
take a strike this year if they could not
lower labor costs.
"HOPEFULLY it's going to create
jobs and hopefully it demonstrated
unity," said USW Vice President
Joseph Odorcich, filling in for ailing
USW President Lloyd McBride as chief
union negotiator in top-level talks that
began Feb. 15.
Even though local issues remained to
be settled at the plant level, Odorcich
said, "there will be no steel strike."

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ty cuts
"This type of agreement is not
pleasant to negotiate, but it is ab-
solutely necessary in these economic
conditions," said Paul Rusen, director
of USW District 23 in Wheeling, W. Va.
The contract replaces the current
three-year pact set to expire Aug. 1.
It cuts wages $1.25 an hour, or about 9
percent, and eliminates some vacation
time, but repays most of the givebacks
in stages over the life of the agreement
and includes an industry commitment
to spend labor savings on plant im-
provements.
The pact also requires a temporary
freeze on cost-of-living allowances -
the issue that gave bargainers the most
trouble and threatened to stall the pact
at the last minute.
FIR GIM
alleges
political
attack
(Continued from Page 1)
Rampson points to a campus group
organized last fall to protest PIRGIM's
funding process as a guise of local
College Republicans despite denials
from the protest group and the College
Republicans.
THE STUDENT Committee for
Reform and Progress launched a
petition drive last month to prevent
groups like PIRGIM from having the
donation slip attached to the SVF.
Group members argue against the
University's favoritism toward
PIRGIM, the only group given the
privilege to solicit donations on the
registration form.-
SCRAP chairman Dan Baker denies
any formal connection with the local
Republican club, but admitted that
several of the group's members are
College Republicans.
Baker said he only heard of the memo
last week, long after SCRAP's
organization last fall. Moreover,
Democratic, Libertarian and other
politicalaviews are represented in the
group, he said.
BUT SCRAP follows "almost ver-
batim" strategies used by other College
Republican-organized groups operating
throughout the nation, Rampson said.
While SCRAP may involve students
with various political orientations,
Rampson said she though it was-
probably the College Republicans who
set "the ball rolling."
Not so, says College Republican
President Karl Edelmann.
"We decided not to make ( fighting
PIRGIM) one of our major goals," said
Edelmann, who added that he has not
seen the memo yet. "While College
Republicans may be working with
SCRAP, College Republicans as a
whole are not."
But Rampson asserted, "It's hard to
believe that (SCRAP) is spontaneous.''
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IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Congress stalls agreement
on natural gas deregulation
WASHINGTON-President Reagan's plan to accelerate the deregulation
of natural gas appeared headed for the congressional back burner yester-
day, with leaders claiming strong opposition from consumers fearful of
higher prices.
Senate Majority Leader Howard Baker (R-Tenn.), said there was little
chance of expediting the measure, particularly in the filibuster-prone, albeit
Republican-dominated Senate. The bill was sent to Capitol Hill from the
White House on Monday.
"We've got to do that some day. We've got to face the issue. But if the
Reagan plan will have a difficult time in Congress, especially in the Senate,"
Baker told reporters.
The battle over then-President Carter's plan to partially deregulate
natural gas prices snarled the Senate for months in 1977. Many of the
Democrats who participated in that earlier filibuster say they are ready to
wage the same kind of battle against the Reagan proposal.
Salvadoran minister rejects
truce proposed for Papal visit
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador-Defense Minister Jose Guillermo Garcia
yesterday rejected guerrilla calls for a cease-fire during Pope John Paul I's
visit and vowed the army would stop fighting only if the rebels surrendered.
"To bring peace to El salvador, I call on (the rebels) to prolong their truce
indefinitely-this would be the means to bring peace," Garcia said.
The leader of the rebels' political arm, Guillermo Ungo, Monday offered
the truce to coincide with the papal visit.
Asked if the army agreed to a cease-fire during the pontiff's nine-hour visit
Sunday, Garcia said the military would continue to fulfill its task.
"We are only reacting to their violence and fulfilling our duty to defend the
country," he said.
Israelis nab Palestine youths
Armed Jewish settlers stormed two Palestinian schools on the Israeli-
occupied West Bank yesterday, fired over students' heads and abducted two
youths, a Palestinian news agency said. Israeli officials said two boys who
had stoned passing cars were taken to a police station.
The Palestinian Press Agency, based in East Jerusalem, said the inciden-
ts involving the Israeli settlers took place at the al-Faruk School in Nablus
and a school in Yatta near Hebron.
The press service said Jewish settlers burst into the two schools and fired
shots above students' heads before abducting two of the youths.
An Israeli military spokesman said he had no information about the repor-
ted attack in Nablus. But he said passengers in an Israeli car that came un-
der a barrage of rocks in Yatta, fired in the air and "took two boys to the
police station." The spokesman said no one was hurt in the Yatta incident.
In Khalde, Lebanon, the Beirut government charged Israeli negotiators
with "intransigence" after the 19th round of U.S.-sponsored talks on the
withdrawal of foreign forces from Lebanon.
OPEC nears price accord
PARIS-The most powerful member of the Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries and the 13-nation cartel's mediator indicated yesterday
that an agreement may be near on lower oil prices they hope will stave off a
costly price war.
"The solution is imminent," said Sheik Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Saudi
Arabia's oil minister, in an interview in Riyadh with French television. "We
are on the verge of reaching an agreement on this subject."
The chief mediator in a week of long-distance negotiations, Venezuelan Oil
Minister Humberto Calderon Berti, also said it appeared an agreement oi
prices was in sight. He added that further talks among the oil producers
were necessary.
OPEC's official benchmark price of Arabian light crude of $34 a barrel
might be cut. OPEC member Nigeria cut its base price to $30 after non-
members Britain and Norway lowered the price of North Sea oil to $30.50.
At meetings in December and January, OPEC faled to agree on a new
price schedule or on production quotas to keep.,the price up, leaving the car-
tel without a joint policy in the face of a worldwide oil glut that is forcing
prices down.
Average American weight
increasing, study shows
NEW YORK-Average Americans are heavier today than they were in
1959 but it's no cause for alarm, the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. repor-
ted yesterday.
The company's new weight tables indicate that as the weight of Americans
increased over the 24 years, so did the weights recommended by the com-
pany 's experts for longest life.
But that emphatically does not mean heavier is better, according to the
publishers of the tables and an American Heart Association doctor.
"FATTER PEOPLE are able to live longer because other risk factors are

being reduced. But that doesn't mean they wouldn't live even longer if they
were thinner," said Dr. Virgil Brown, chairman of the heart association's
nutrition committee and professor of medicine at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New
York.
Brown said many factors influence health and length of life. The ideal
weight for many people could be higher or lower than the weight ranges
specified in the new study.
Vol. XCIII, No. 117
Wednesday, March 2, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
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Managing Editor.....................JANET RAE
Opinion Page Editors................KENT REDDING
DAVID SPAK
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News Editor...................GEORGE ADAMS
Student Affairs Editor................BETH ALLEN
Arts/Magazine Editor.................. BEN TICHO
Associate Arts/Mogazine Editors. LARRY DEAN
MARE HODGES
SUSAN MAKUCH
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CHUCK JAFFE
LARRY MISHKIN
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