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February 17, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-02-17

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C Page 2-Thursday, February 17, 1983-The Michigan Daily

LOSE 20 POUNDS
IN TWO WEEKS!
Famous U. S. Women's
Alpine Ski Team Diet
During the non-snow off season the
U.S Women's Alpine Ski Team mem-
bers used the "Ski Team" diet to lose
20 pounds in two weeks. That's right-
20 pounds in 14 days! The basis of the
diet is chemical food action and was
devised by a famous Colorado physi-
cian especially for the U.S. Ski Team.
Normal energy is maintained (very
important!) while reducing. You keep
"full" - no starvation - because the
diet is designed that way. It's a diet that
is easy to follow whether you work,
travel or stay at home.
This is, honestly, a fantastically suc-
cessful diet. If it weren't, the U.-S.
Women's Ski Team wouldn't be per-
mitted to use it Right? So, give yourself
the same break the U.S. Ski Team
gets. Lose weight the scientific, proven
way. Even if you've tried all the other
diets, you owe it to yourself to try the
U.S. Women's Ski Team Diet. That is,
if you really do want to lose 20 pounds
in two weeks. Order today. Tear this
out as a reminder.
Send only $3.00 ($3.25 for Rush
Service) - cash is O.K. - to:Ski Slim,
P.O. Box 1372, Morro Bay, CA 93442.
Don't order unless you expect to
lose 20 pounds in two weeks! Because
that's what the Ski Team Diet will do.
*1982

Reagan promses jobs bill;
defends besieged Gorsuch

IN BRIEF

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON - President Reagan,
declaring economic recovery "is
beginning to flex its muscles," said last
night he hopes to sign legislation by
March that will spend more than $4
billion to create 470,000 jobs for the
nation's unemployed.
Reagan said the jobs bill would be
followed by a further program aimed at
long-term economic recovery, which he
hopes Congress will pass quickly.
"One of the most discouraging things
about the recession is its duration,''
Reagan said in ithe opening statement
of his 16th formal news conference.
"There is encouraging news," he said,
citing a 0.9 percent jump in industrial
production and a record 35.9 percent in-
crease in housing starts last month.
"THIS UPTURN is supported by
other favorable economic reports in
recent weeks," he said. "As a resultsof
the economic program already in
place, the recovery is beginning to flex
its muscles."
But Reagan said, "the question still
before" the nation is how to reduce
unemployment. He said he has instruc-
ted his economic advisers "not to bring
me just another quick fix."

"We've been working toward a bipar-
tisan compromise on jobs and
humanitarian aid, and I hope within the
next several days we can reach
agreement with the Congress so a bill
can be on my desk by March," he said.
WHILE FINAL details are incom-
plete he said it would include $4 billion
for creating 470,000 new jobs directly
and indirectly, $2.9 million for exten-
ding unemployment insurance and $300
million in "humanitarian relief."
Reagan defended the embattled ad-
ministrator of the Environmental
Protection Agency as both the White
House and Congress said they were
nearing agreement on congressional
access to disputed EPA documents.
Reagan said EPA head Anne Gorsuch
had compiled a "splendid record"
which was being overlooked in the
"flurry of accusations" in recent weeks
over the agency's handling of a $1.6
billion program for .hazardous waste
cleanup.
GORSUCH HAS been cited for con-
tempt of Congress by the House for
refusing under a claim of executive
privilege to turn over documents
relating to how the EPA used the
"Superfund" in the nation's toxic waste

Reagan
... economy is flexing its muscles
cleanup program. There have been
charges that political considerations
allowed some businesses not to pay
their share in cleanup operations.
"I can no longer insist on executive
privilege (to retain the documents) if
there is a suspicion in the minds of the
people that maybe it is being used to
cover some wrongdoing. That we will
never stand for," Reagan said.

TONIGHT'S BEER NIGHT
AT UNO'S
?
QUART
BEER
49
OUART
AFTER 9 PM.
PIZZA BY THE SLICE- $1.00
DAILY 11:30-2 a.m. FROZEN AND CARRY-
1321 S. UNIVERSITY OUT AVAILABLE
ANN ARBOR 769-1894
restaurant and bar
p S

Industry rebound hins
at economic recovery

(Continued from Page 1)
commodate a "moderate recovery"
while attempting to drive'the inflation
rate even lower.
UNTIL HIS term ends in August,
Volcker is expected to maintain the an-
ti-inflation priorities he adopted when
President Carter appointed him to the
job in 1979. At that time, inflation had
reached 13.3 percent compared to last
year's 3.9 percent.
If the December and January in-
crease in the Fed's industrial produc-
tion index are maintained, they even-
tually will prompt factories to begin
calling back workers, Volcker said.
The Fed expects unemployment to
average 9.9 percent to 10.4 percent by
the fourth quarter. It was 10.5 percent
in the last three months of 1982.
IN ITS NEW report on industrial
production, the Fed said the output of
consumer goods grew a seasonally ad-
justed 0.9 percent in January, reflec-
ting an increase in the production of
cars and home goods. Auto assemblies
- at an annual rate of 5.6 million units
- were about 10 percent higher last

month than in December, it said.
Private reports have predicted auto
production will continue rising in the
next few months.
THE PRODUCTION of food and
clothing also grew in January, although
a decline was recorded in consumer
energy products.
The Fed reported a January surge in
the production of construction supplies
and of basic metals, particularly steel.
The strong showing by the depressed
steel industry was mostly attributed by
economists to the boost in auto output.
The report also said the output of
defense and space equipment advanced
0.8 percent last month.
OVERALL OUTPUT of products was
up 0.6 percent last month, and produc-
tion of materials was up 1.3 percent.
But January's production rate was
still 3.2 percent below the year-ago
level.
The Commerce Department said new
houses were begun last month at an an-
nual rate of 1.72 million units, the
highest since the 1.83 million rate of
September 1979.

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Soviet troops operating
missiles in Syria, Shultz says
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State George Shultz said yesterday that
Soviet troops are in Syria to operate Soviet SAM-5 long-range anti-aircraft
missiles which Moscow recently supplied.
While U.S. intelligence officials had anticipated a Soviet presence to
operate the missiles, Shultz offered the first public confirmation this has
happened.
Appearing before the House foreign Affairs Committee, Shultz said the
missiles, which have a range of up to 190 miles, don't seriously threaten
Israel. "Right now it's hard to argue that there is somebody around there
that really can threaten Israeli security," he said.
Shultz said he has been personally assured by Syria that its troops will
withdraw from Lebanon when Israeli troops leave. He said he saw a
"reasonable possibility" that Jordan's King Hussein would become involved
in Middle East peace talks.
Shultz also said President Reagan won't retreat from his "zero option"
proposal for eliminating all medium-range nuclear missiles from Europe,
although he's willing to discuss Soviet counterproposals.
Begin wins no-confidence vote
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Menachem Begin's coalition easily
defeated three parliamentary no-confidence motions yesterday aimed at
toppling the government over the Beirut massacre inquiry.
The 64-56 vote, followed party lines. It was the 12th time Begin has crushed
no-confidence motions since his re-election in June 1981.
Reports circulated, meanwhile, that serious efforts were under way to
draw Begin's Likud bloc and the opposition Labor Party together into a
"national unity government" aimed at healing Israel's split over the inquiry
report and the ouster of Ariel Sharon as defense minister.
Both Labor and Likud appeared divided over whether to go ahead with the'
union.
Sharon resigned as defense minister Sunday after the inquiry commission
criticized his decision last September to let Lebanese Christian militiamen
in to two west Beirut refugee camps where hundreds of civilians were
slaughtered. But Sharon remained in the Cabinet as a minister without por-
tfolio.
EPA documents to be released
WASHINGTON - Top Reagan administration officials went to Capitol Hill
yesterday to outline a compromise that would release disputed Environmen-
tal Protection Agency documents but would limit who in Congress could see
them.
The documents are the focus of a half-dozen congressional investigations
of the EPA and of a constitutional struggle between Congress and the White
House. The administration's refusal to release them led to a contempt of
Congress charge against EPA Administrator Anne Gorsuch.
Administration sources, who answered questions on condition they not be
named, said the basic proposal was to show the documents only to Rep.
Elliott Levitas, chairman of the subcommittee that originally subpoenaed
them, and the ranking Republican on his subcommittee.
No one else on Capitol Hill would see the original documents in their
entirety, the sources said.
Meanwhile, another possible compromise was being discussed to gain
congressional testimony by a fired EPA official who headed the $1.6 billion
superfund toxic waste cleanup program that is the subject of the six in-
vestigations underway in Congress.
Australian brushfires kill 30
ADELAIDE, Australia - Brushfires driven by galeforce winds ravaged
hundreds of square miles of southern Australia yesterday, killing at least 30
people and destroying more than 100 homes in one of the country's worst
blazes in half a century.
"We have given up trying to save homes," said one firefighter. "All we can
do now is to attempt to save people."
Hundreds of people were injured, including at least 30 hospitalized in
serious condition, authorities said.
They said at least 18 people perished in the state of South Australia - some
trapped in cars, others in their homes - and at least 12 more died in the
neighboring southeastern state of Victoria.
U.S. sends AWACs to Egypt
WASHINGTON - The United States has sent "several" AWACs planes to
Egypt and has moved an aircraft carrier battle group to counter aLibyan
aircraft buildup apparently aimed at the Sudan, Pentagon sources disclosed
last night.
The carrier Nimitz and its escorts are now operating north of the Gulf of
Sidre, waters claimed by Libya but held by the United States to be inter-
national. It was over that gulf that U.S. fighters shot down two Libyan planes
two years ago.
According to the Pentagon sources, who spoke only on condition that they
not be identified, Libyan leader Col. Moammar Khadafy has moved air units
to bases in Chad, the adjacent country to the south where Libya has been
supporting one faction in a civil war.
Those units appear to threaten the Sudan, Chad's eastern neighbor, the
sources said.
Egypt has moved units of its own air force to bases in southern Egypt, nor-
th of Chad, to be in a position to counter any Libyan moves, the sources said.

Vol. XCIII, No. 114
Thursday, February 17, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
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Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
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Local groups plan actions
against rally by neo-Nazis

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(Continued from Page1)
sponsored a non-violent counter
demonstration, has not decided how it
will respond this year.
RABBI ALLAN Kensky, of the
Jewish Community Council of
Washtenaw County, which wasione of
the 25 groups participating in last
year's peaceful counter-demonstration,
said the council will meet next week to
discuss its response to the rally.
"We're planning a formal response to
the Nazis' annearance this year.

although we're not sure what form that
will take," he said. "We're upset that
they're coming here."
The All People's Congress, however,
has already obtained a marching per-
mit for a "strong and militant demon-
stration" against the S.S. Action Group
rally, said congress member Mike
Shane.
Members of the congress appeared at
the Ann Arbor City Council meeting
Monday night, carrying a sign that
said, "We need jobs, not racism. No to
the Klan and Nazis."
Mayor Louis Belcher has expressed
his opposition to the neo-Nazis' ap-
pearance in Ann Arbor, but said he
cannot prevent them or anyone from
assembling a peaceful rally.

0

GESIGIA
INISTHUITE
TEIIEIULI

IF

AMICHIGAN
STUDENT
ASSEMBLY
Partially funded by the Michigan Student Assembly,
FREE copies of this informative booklet are now
available at the MSA office, 3909 Michigan Union.
The booklet contains information on how to prevent
sexual assaults and where to get help and
additional information.
PICK UP YOUR COPY TODAY - EDUCATE YOURSELF AND HELP
IN THE FIGHT TO MAKE THIS CAMPUS AND YOUR CITY SAFE.
PMtect
you
Body...,

Major areas of graduate study and research (M.S. & Ph.D.):

Aerodynamics
Aeroelasticity
Bioengineering
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Computational Fluid Dynamics
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Total financial aid per calendar year:
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SUSAN MAKUCH
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