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February 11, 1983 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-02-11
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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W"UW -n asma ~s m- - rn rm m a mm==m enmena
Chose A Lasting;
VALENTINE GIFT
f From the "OLD FASHIONED" TOY STORE
" LARGE SELECTION OF very reasonably
priced VALENTINE STUFFED ANIMALS
"ON THE CAMPUS"
FRIENDLY STUDENT STORE 3
AM US & Oy 514 E. William j
,1 662-0035 I
Briarwood Mall (located near center court) Ann Arbor
Fresh & silk flowers arranged by Debbie

JOHN PRINE

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- w

-W

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11

MICHIGAN THEATRE
FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 8:00 P.M.
Reserve Seating - $8.50 & $9.50
Available at Michigan Theatre box office

G

!'].

V
9
9

F. T. D. member

r

Plants, pots, baskets and more baskets!
Unique gift items now reduced.
We will be open Sunday, February 13th for
Valentine's Day deliveries!!!

9
9
9

An Uno pizza,
a jug of wine
and thou.

I

L Mon.-Sat. 10-9, Sun. 12-5

Telephone 769-6361

......... -....-..

OPE

Corner of Harvard St.and Rt 9Framingham
Comm. Ave. Alston 22 John F. Kennedy St
731 Boylston St Boston Harvard Sq.
Daily I1-2 AM Daily 11-2 AM

I

OCITIZEN

tremes by certain sectors of the Jewish
community. Amy P. states that she
does not restrict her friendships to the
Jewish community, but adds, "I do
have (Jewish) friends who don't
associate with someone because of
their religion or color, and they think
I'm really weird because I associate
with people who aren't part of the little
clique."
She insists, however, that this at-
titude is reciprocated fully by some of
the majority community on campus.
For example, she says, "There are so
many fraternities that won't even con-
sider a Jew. You have to have a lot of
guts to even walk through the door at
rush. There is one on the corner of my
street where they yell 'kike' sometimes
when I walk by."
Though all their experiences are not
as blatant as this, some Jews find their
attempts to interact with others on
campus to be problematic and
discouraging.
Lisa D. is a senior from New York
who chose to live in a house with non-
Jews. After a year, she has soured
somewhat on her personal experiment
in interacting closely with the majority
community.
Lisa complains of a series of com-
ments which, while unintentional and
based on ignorance of Jewish culture,
pain and annoy her nonetheless.
"It seems that not a day goes by that
I'm not reminded that I'm Jewish," she
says. "I never point out to my
housemates that they are non-Jewish."
Lisa also resents the use of the "Jap"
stereotype. "A common comment in
my house is that I look like one, but I
don't act like one. So once I asked, 'How
do 'Japs' act?' and they couldn't answer
me."
Her association with both Jews and
non-Jews presents another problem. "A
lot of times I feel that for me, right now,
I have two categories of friends, and if
they come into contact with each other,
somebody feels uncomfortable."
Something as innocuous as going to
the bar and choosing to go to Charley's
or going upstairs to the Count is
problematic to the degree that one
group or the other feels slighted by her
choice.
That comment points to a most in-
teresting aspect of the Good Time
Charley's/Count of Antipasto social
scene that illustrates the schism bet-
ween the two groups.
It is not readily apparent, since the
crowds on both levels seem quite
homogenous. But on Thursdays for the
past year, the bars have been
dramatically segregated, with a
wealthy Jewish crowd on the upper
level, and a wealthy WASP/Greek
crowd on the lower.
G A 'JAP' IS very chic, very con-
temporary. She wears all the
latest things as soon as they come out.
She's into make-up, accessories. Looks
are very important to her. She may not
be all that pretty, but because she pays
close attention to her looks, you think
she's pretty," says Julie B., an LSA
junior.
Julie is relaxed, casual, rather
amused by the phenomenon, so she
speaks freely about her peers. When the
subject turns to politics, though, she
responds with a wide-eyed look of sur-
prise.
"You don't understand!" she shouts,
disintegrating into laughter. "Japs
don't think about politics. They think
about whether Bergdorf's (an ultra-
chic, New York retailer) is going to
close. They don't think about things
going wrong - and if things do go
wrong, daddy will take care of it."
Julie emphatically divorces herself
from the "Jap" image, that whole
milieu that she categorically terms

Newman Schiff
UN
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4,
OO PC
LOCATED AT
MEJJER THRIFTY ACRES

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Count of Antipasto: Packing in the crowds

I

$125 -

CITIZEN
MAKING
THE MOST
OF TIME

"ridiculous." A lifetime resident of an
affluent, predominantly Jewish suburb
outside New York, she has come to
loathe the suburban lifestyle for what
she sees as its emphasis on materialism
and its exclusivity.
"In my elementary school, there
were probably six blacks. By high
school, there were about two. This is not
a very diverse community we're
talking about. When you spend all your
life with the same group of people, it
doesn't make sense to come to college
and do the same thing. It's too narrow.
Her contempt for the "Charley's
crowd" is evident behind a veneer of
mischevious humor. "I would seriously

to be insular and confining, her
relatively casual attitude towards the
religion and its attendant political stan-
ces put her at odds with this group.
"I felt I was being forced to 'be a
Jew,' to prove my Jewishness,' " she
says. In effect, despite her anti-
materialistic views, her matter-of-fact
attitude toward her ethnicity caused
her to be seen by some Jews at the
school as being shallow, apathetic, and
spoiled - in short, a "Jap."
Cheryl M., an LSA senior, is a Thur-
sday night regular at The Count. She is
from the predominantly Jewish suburb
of Roslyn, Long Island, where she went
to a high school that she says was 85 .

LIB

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Ypsilanfi, MI 48197
(313) 971-7122

'I'm very proud of being a Jew, and belonging to a
very special segment of society. But I find that it's
very difficult (to be a Jew) in America. There's
less emphasis on Judaism and more on

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.
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materialism.

I.
I
I

Hours: 9:00 to 9:00 Mon. thru Fri.
9:00 to 6:00 Sat.
GRAND OPENING SPECIAL
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$ 00
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Includes eye exams, standard lenses,
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Expires Feb. 28, 1983

-Barb W., student

1
I

I 16

Cheryl adm
her friends a
her hometown
typical of the
"We (the J
isolated from
ways, especia
ds to support
people tend
kind."
Though she
been a victim
she says, "TI
ferent comma
not a big pr
problem." Aft
ds, "I can't re
I haven't real
breaking dowi
groups."
Cheryl, whc
takes strong
Jewish wom(
meet a husbar
"I have nev
career, mayb(
my mother as
Despite the
the campus c(
sists that this
portunities f
cultures. "Th
has been goo(
my roommat
had never be4
and she had n
little uncomfo
to like each o
about the Uni
you get to kn
you're forced
Looking ba
Cheryl expres
decision to co
think I grew
mommy and c
I now know tl
own."
Phillip Lawe

Fashion styling. Step motion,

sweep second hand.
Adjustable bracelet.

TL _ _i " . ...

question how many of these people who
go there on Thursdays have a good self
image. It's boring. I would rather do
anything," she says, pausing to find a
suitably acerbic alternative,
" ... even going bowlingthan go to
Charleys."
Julie's comparison of the social at-
mosphere for Jews here and at a
private southern university from which
she transferred after her first year
provide interesting sidelights.
At the southern school, she says, the
relatively small size of the Jewish
community, in addition to what she saw
as the implicit anti-Semitism of the
majority population made for an ex-
tremely uncomfortable experience for
her compared to her Michigan story.
Taking an inability to penetrate the
majority population's social scene for
granted, she was forced to attempt to fit
into a Jewish community that she found

percent Jewish. Her parents, a dentist
and a hospital administrator, are quite
well off.
With her fashionably dressed, petite
frame, dark brown just-home-from-the-
hairdressers-hair, translucent gray-
green eyes, and an easy smile that
reveals the cutest little overbite this
side of Georgia'Engel, she is, visually,
simply stunning. According to many
people, she is also the absolute per-
sonification of the Jewish American
Princess.
Cheryl is aware of the way in which
she generally is perceived, but she
views it philosophically. "I know that a
lot of people judge me on appearances,
but that may be a natural thing to do.
I'm sometimes guilty of it too -
sometimes I say, 'I don't want to know
her, she's a Jap,' but then later I've got-
ten to know some of these people and
they're not like that at all."

There's no such thing as an

average Citizen.
OCITIZEN

. MEDICAID
SENIOR'CITIZEN
DISCOUNT
J E WEIR Y A ND F IN E WA T CH E S
Howard Newman O.D. Harold Schiff O.D.13 -SOUTH UNIVERSITY ANN ARBOR
2 Weekend/February 11, 1983

15 Wee

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