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January 05, 1983 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-01-05

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, January 5, 1983-Page 9

Catching up on

the

news

Arroyo
sentencing
delayed
until
Friday

C7 x-

EMU eliminates four
academic programs

Read
and
Use
Daily
Classifieds

Despite the rejection of his insanity
plea, convicted Economics Building ar-
sonist Arthur Arroyo was not sentenced
as scheduled, on Dec. 10, so that a
suitable psychiatric treatment facility
' within the state's prison system could
be located.
Although Washtenaw Circuit Court
Judge Henry Conlin ruled in November
that Arroyo "was not, and is not men-
tally ill," he delayed sentencing to
allow the defense request for
psychiatric placement, which was en-
dorsed by a probation department
report recommending treatment.
Arroyo is now scheduled to be senten-
ced this Friday.
ARROYO, 31, was convicted Novem-
ber 4 of setting the Christmas Eve 1981
fire that destroyed the 125-year-old
Economics Building and of. a second
charge of breaking and entering in the
theft of a typewriter earlier in the year.
"What good does it do to put him in
prison? Obviously the judge feels Ar-
thur needs treatment and needs to be
out of society," said Arroyo's attorney,
Mitchell Nelson.
According to Nelson, although Arroyo
does not satisfy the legal requirements
of insanity, he suffers from severe per-
sonality disorders which require
treatment.

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
Convicted Economics Building arsonist Arthur Arroyo is scheduled to be
sentenced this Friday. The original sentencing date, Dec. 10, was postponed
while state officials tried to locate an appropriate treatment facility for him.

By GLEN YOUNG
Eastern Michigan University, feeling
the pinch of cutbacks in enrollment and
state aid, eliminated four of its
academic programs last to save
money.
The decision to close the programs
came in December's meeting of the
EMU Regents and followed a recom-
mendation of the school's Division of
Academic Affairs.
THE EMU master's degree program
in chemistry education, and un-
dergraduate programs in community
college biology teaching, library scien-
ce, and the College of Business insuran-
ce program will no longer be accepting
students, said Susanne Fleming, acting
associate vice president for academic
affairs.
Declining enrollment was the main
reason for the elimination of the
programs, Fleming said, but added
that loss of state funds played some
part in the decision.
"It's hard to say whether there will
be major savings to the university,"
she said, "but there were many finan-
cial criteria which were also reviewed
during the process."~
The decisions were made after an in-
tensive review of EMU's entire
curriculum two years ago, Fleming
said. These four programs were
deemed most feasible to eliminate, she
said.
"WE'RE AT A point in time where I
don't think we'll ever be in the situation
again where everybody can offer
everything," she said. "Each in-
stitution will have to carve their own
niche."
Fleming, who was instrumental in
developing the review process, said it is
not primarily concerned with
eliminating programs, but with up-
grading the quality of the programs.
The eliminations will not necessitate
faculty lay-offs, Fleming said, because
all of the instructors involved in those
programs also have other teaching
duties and will be kept on to maintain
them.

FLEMING ALSO said that students
currently enrolled in the targeted
programs will be able to complete their
studies in those concentrations, though
no new students may enroll in those
programs.
The elimination of the Library Scien-
ce program will probably save EMU
the most money, Fleming said, but she
cited no specific dollar amount.
That program required special con-
sideration, she added, because EMU is
currently the only school in Michigan
which offers an undergraduate
program in library science. The
enrollment, however, has declined
from 85, in 1979, to 12, last year, she
said.
Reviewers were also a bit hesitant
about the master's degree program in
chemistry education because of a
prediction that there will be a shortage
of secondary school chemistry teachers
in the next five to ten years.

STATE FORENSIC psychiatrists
testified earlier that Arroyo is suffering
from a personality disorder of the
"paranoid type" and is a borderline
schizophrenic, but does not satisfy the
state's legal definition of insanity.
Arroyo, who has held 40 jobs over the
past 10 years, testified during his trial
that he had set the fire because he was
upset at being fired from his University
job and because he felt University
professors were supporting Reagan
administration policies.
Conlin said he received more than 20
letters from individuals throughout the
country-including former University

faculty members-urging him to
provide Arroyo with psychiatric treat-
ment.
"You should feel honored that so
many people are concerned about your
welfare," Conlin told Arroyo after
postponing the sentencing date to
Friday at 9 a.m.
The fire caused an estimated $2
million in damage and the loss of its
contents, including many irreplaceable
documents and research materials.
Arroyo could receive a maximum of 10
years and $2,000 in fines for each of the
charges.

[2 DVIUAL THEATRaS
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COME SHARE THE
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Produced by Gary Kurtz
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Senate endorses MRC proposal

By FANNIE WEINSTEIN
At its December meeting, the
University's Faculty Senate voted to
endorse in principle a proposal to form
a private corporation that would
develop, and market the discoveries of
University researchers.
y By approving the motion made by
business Prof. Herbert Hildebrandt, the
faculty leaves administrators and an
appointed faculty committee to work
out the operating procedures for the
corporation, according to Hildebrandt.
THE PLAN creating a Michigan
Research Corporation has been con-
troversial, and many questions regar-
Congressm
, winter con
By LOU FINTOR
Congressman William Ford (D-
Fifteenth District) challenged more
than 2,200 graduates to "shake this
country by its roots using the tools and
developmental muscle provided by this
institution" during winter commen-
cement exercises held December 19 in
Hill Aduitorium.
Ford noted that this year's
" graduating class is "not as young, not
as male, and not as white" as when he
attended college. An audience of more
than 4,500 spectators watched as Ford
and federal judge Carl McGowan
received honorary degrees during the
ceremony.
" FORD PRAISED the efforts of
Congress to provide financial assistan-
ce to thousands of low - and middle-in-
come students who might not otherwise
PAINF
I
K.

ding the ethics of mixing profit and
academics have been raised.
The $200,000 necessary to start the
corporation would come from Univer-
sity's investment funds. The money
would pay ,for a board of directors,
staff, and president who,"in turn, would
try to draw money from businesses,
private investors, foundations, and the
state government.
The senate's endorsement, approved
by a 33-13 margin, is only advisory. The
final decision rests with University
administrators and the Regents.
Some faculty members who op-
posed the proposal said they did not

think there was enough support at the
University to justify approving such a
plan, especially since it would affect all
faculty members.
"The enthusiasm at the University
for this proposal was small and con-
fined to a very small segment of the
faculty," said history Prof. David
Hollinger.
In other senate business, the faculty
voted to add two students to the Univer-
sity's Financial Affairs Committee.
The senate also appointed medical
school Prof. Paul Gikas as Big Ten
Faculty Representative and library
science Prof. Gwen Cruzat as Gikas' co-
renresentative.

NEED
TEXTBOOKS?

= WE'RE

an speaks at
imencement
afford an education.
Ford, who will begin his tenth term
this month, currently serves on the
Education and Labor Committee, and
is a member of the Subcommittee on
Postsecondary Education.
The country currently is suffering one
of the worst depressions in history,
Ford said, speaking to an audience in a
state hard-hit by the decline of the auto Tg
industry. He observed that this year's
class will enter a job market with moreWtlw
than 12 million jobless workers and
record business failures.
In contrast, University President
Harold Shapiro offered optimism.
"The contemporary world provides us
with numerous opportunities for
growth," Shapiro said, adding that an
education at the University "has helped
you to develop a sense of values along
with a sense of responsibility."

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